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219 results

Article

Our Experience in Giving Kannada as First Language

Publication: The Child and You, vol. 11

Pages: 30-31

Asia, India, Indigenous communities, South Asia, South Asia

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Language: English

Doctoral Dissertation

Égwú Àmàlà: Women in Traditional Performing Arts in Ogbaruland

Available from: University of Pittsburgh ETD

Africa, Indigenous communities, Indigenous peoples, Sub-Saharan Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, West Africa

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Abstract/Notes: Within the complex dynamics of gender relationships and roles among African peoples, women often exercise power through song and dance. Such is the case among the women of Ogbaruland in southern Nigeria who, in their performance of the dance drama Égwú Àmàlà , act as custodians of knowledge and tradition and as transmitters of culture.Apart from being a repository of information about artistic traditions, the genre also documents and enacts the history and culture of the Ogbaru people. Égwú Àmàlà, which is the subject of my dissertation, is the most popular of all Ogbaru women dance genres. The term Égwú Àmàlà literally means "paddle dance" or "paddle drama," but it is often referred to as the "mermaid dance" or égwú mmili, that is, "water dance" because of its ritualistic associations with Onye-mmili, the water divinity. This genre is predominantly performed by women of all ages, with men playing secondary roles such as òpì(gourd horn) player and paddlers of canoes when the genre is performed in the river setting. My study of Égwú Àmàlà will add to a small but growing body of literature demonstrating how gender, a locus classicus for debates in contemporary scholarship, relates to other domains of culture such as musical performance, and how gender constructions can be articulated as well as negotiated in the genre and through the performing arts in general. Since the origin and performance of Égwú Àmàlà revolves around rituals and water, this dissertation also discusses the religious dimensions of the genre, stressing the importance of water to the dance, to the Ogbaru people and to African traditional religion as well. Considering the fact that women have for decades preserved Égwú Àmàlà, which epitomizes the culture and traditions of the Ogbaru people, the present investigation represents a significant contribution to ethnomusicological, gender, and cultural studies. [Excerpt: "With the ecclesiastical permission of the Holy See, Mother Mary Magdalen Charles Walker left her home country of Ireland in response to the request of Bishop Joseph Shanahan to serve the people of God in Calabar, southern Nigeria. Her focus was the education of children and helping to improve the lives of women in the area. She established the first Montessori School in Calabar – Convent school, which became an exemplary educational institution in West Africa." p. 54]

Language: English

Published: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 2008

Article

Montessori in Aboriginal Society [Perth, Australia]

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: The Constructive Triangle (1974-1989), vol. 16, no. 2

Pages: 14, 16, 20

Australasia, Australia, Australia and New Zealand, Indigenous communities, Indigenous peoples, Oceania

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Language: English

ISSN: 0010-700X

Article

Johnson Motivates Students to Learn, Live a Good Life

Publication: The Sault Tribe News, vol. 24, no. 6

Pages: 10

Americas, Indigenous communities, Indigenous peoples, North America, North America, United States of America

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Language: English

Article

Five Questions for Trisha Moquino

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 33, no. 3

Pages: 14-15

American Montessori Society (AMS) - Periodicals, Americas, Indigenous communities, North America, North America, United States of America, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Function of Hopi Child Center Given

Publication: Hopi Action News (Winslow, Arizona)

Pages: 1

Americas, Indigenous communities, Indigenous peoples, North America, North America, United States of America

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Language: English

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Montessori Preschool Landscape in the United States: History, Programmatic Inputs, Availability, and Effects

Available from: Wiley Online Library

Publication: ETS Research Report Series, vol. 2019, no. 1

Pages: 1-20

Americas, Montessori method of education, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: The Day 1 Academies Fund aims to support a network of high-quality, full-scholarship, Montessori-inspired preschools in underserved communities. To provide insight into the fund's pedagogical inspiration, in this report I provide a high-level overview of the Montessori preschool landscape in the United States. This overview includes 5 key programmatic elements of a traditional Montessori approach to teaching and learning in classrooms serving preschool-aged children, the reported availability of Montessori programs that enroll 3- and 4-year-old children, and what is known about enrollees' demographics. To situate this information in the larger, publicly financed, early education policy context, I also provide similar data for state-funded pre-K and federally funded Head Start programs for preschoolers. In addition, I review research on children's outcomes after participating in U.S.-based Montessori preschool and elementary programs. This overview provides some context for understanding how the Day 1 Academies Fund eventually defines the constructs of high quality, Montessori inspired, and underserved. This review also suggests it could be useful for the Fund's stakeholders to undertake short-term research examining the current early education options of families with low incomes living in low-access-to-Montessori states as well as long-term research aimed at expanding the research base on the effects of Montessori programs aimed at preschoolers.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1002/ets2.12252

ISSN: 2330-8516

Report

Differentiated Teaching and Learning in Heterogeneous Classrooms: Strategies for Meeting the Needs of All Students

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: This guide provides conceptual as well as practical information for meeting the needs of all learners in heterogeneous classrooms. The first six sections discuss the growing heterogeneity in today's classrooms, the rationale for differentiated teaching and learning, the changing roles of teachers and students, the importance of creating classroom communities that nurture diversity, helpful ideas for organizing a classroom in which differentiated teaching and learning is practiced, and a step-by-step process for differentiation. The seventh section provides many examples of how to differentiate teaching and learning in four areas: (1) what students learn; (2) how students learn; (3) how students integrate and demonstrate what they have learned; and (4) how students and teachers utilize assessment throughout the learning process. Sections 8 and 9 include an in-depth look at actual classrooms through case studies. The first case study describes how two multi-age elementary classrooms

Language: English

Published: Minneapolis, Minnesota, 1997

Conference Paper

Culturally Relevant Education and the Montessori Approach: Perspectives from Hawaiian Educators

Available from: ERIC

Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (San Francisco, CA, Apr 8, 2006)

Americas, Culturally relevant pedagogy, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (San Francisco, CA, Apr 8, 2006). The purpose of this study was to investigate why some Hawaiian language and culture-based (HLCB) educators perceived the Montessori approach to be congruent with their goals and values and to determine the salient features of the Montessori approach used by HLCB teachers who received Montessori training. The sociocultural perspective on learning provided the theoretical foundations and grounded theory methodology guided the research process. Interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with 40 HLCB participants, including 15 key informants who had at least 180 hours of Montessori training. Data also included classroom and school visits and analyses of school documents. Data analysis revealed six themes and two linkages that related the themes and their elements. Four themes were related to why HLCB educators have perceived the Montessori approach to be congruent with their values and goals. These were (a) similar views regarding their work as a lifestyle, (b) common pedagogical practices, (c) shared values and beliefs as educators, and (d) an overlapping world-view. One theme described the distinctions between the approaches. The final theme included challenges to implementing and maintaining HLCB programs. The findings suggest that researchers and teacher educators interested in culturally congruent education should take into account the underlying world-view of both the research paradigm and the participants involved, and that school reform should be comprehensive, culturally congruent, and generated from within communities and other stakeholders. They also indicate that culturally congruent, place-based education may enhance academic self-efficacy and could serve as a bridge between seemingly disparate educational approaches.

Language: English

Conference Paper

Continuous Progress Evaluation of American Indian Preschoolers

Available from: ERIC

Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (Washington, DC, March 30-April 3, 1975)

Americas, Indigenous communities, Indigenous peoples, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Monthly testing based on a counterbalanced matrix sampling plan in one psychomotor, three affective, and five cognitive areas provides a continuous picture of the development of native American children enrolled in three distinct curricula. Of the nine scales, one showed negative, two showed insignificant, and six showed significant positive changes. When compared with national norms, the results suggest that all three curricula have strong remedial effects across a broad range of important areas of preschool learning. (Author)

Language: English

Pages: 20

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