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988 results

Honors Thesis

Applying Constructivist Methodology to Enhance Earth and Space Science (ESS) Teaching in Montessori Schools

Available from: Arizona State University Library

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Abstract/Notes: This paper recommends amendments to the Montessori teaching system, which can in turn be adapted by individual educators or administrative school boards. The proposed tools mentioned in this paper follow the tenets of Constructivist teaching, which Montessori uses as some of its core teaching values (“Who and What is Montessori?”). Constructivist teaching argues that students learn best when they are able to apply their knowledge base to new learning experiences. The word comes from the idea that students are “constructing” their knowledge base one piece at a time, a process that starts from the ground, or base layer, and builds up from that. This construction involves physical representations of concepts, or guided experiences. Contrary to traditional, “top down” teaching, students learning through constructivist teaching get to experiment with learning concepts before a teacher explains the proper theory. These teachings try to generate excitement for the subject matter as extensions of students’ prior learning. Simulation and data visualization are powerful tools that allow students to discover the patterns present in natural processes by giving them the power to affect the environment and see the results. Implementation of the learning strategies of data visualizations and simulations should improve student performance and excitement in Earth and Space Science (ESS), while also being compliant with the Montessori teaching method.

Language: English

Published: Tempe, Arizona, 2022

Article

Montessori Demonstration at Acton Wells School

Publication: Montessori Notes, vol. 3, no. 19

Pages: 30, 32

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Language: English

Article

Scuole di redenzione [Schools of Redemption]

Publication: Risveglio Educativo: Monitore Bisettimanale delle Scuole Elementari, vol. 15, no. 23

Pages: 185-187

Maria Montessori - Writings

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Language: Italian

Article

Escoles Montessori [Montessori schools]

Available from: Trencadís. Fons locals digitalitzats. Xarxa de Biblioteques Municipals

Publication: El Dia, no. 87

Pages: 1

Europe, Southern Europe, Spain

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Language: Catalan

Article

Starry Night: Good Addition to Any Elementary School's Software

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 10, no. 2

Pages: 13

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Longitudinal Corroboration of a Cross-Sectional Study of Development of Preschool Children with the Arrow-dot Test

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: Perceptual and Motor Skills, vol. 30, no. 1

Pages: 269-270

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Abstract/Notes: Children in a Montessori preschool were administered a series of tests at the beginning of the school year and retested on the same battery 8 mo. later, at the end of the school year. The children exhibited a mean gain of about 11 points on the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test IQ. They also exhibited a decline in Impuisivity and an increase in Superego scores, on the average, as measured by the Arrow-Dot Test. These longitudinal results corroborate an earlier cross-sectional analysis; and, as these results follow a prediction from Freudian theory, give indication of construct validity for the test.

Language: English

DOI: 10.2466/pms.1970.30.1.269

ISSN: 1558-688X, 0031-5125

Article

Uit de Montessorischool

Available from: Stadsarchief Amsterdam (Amsterdam City Archives)

Publication: Montessori Opvoeding, vol. 4, no. 11

Pages: 86

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Language: Dutch

Master's Thesis

A Comparison of Reading Attainment in Two First Grade Classes in a State and a Montessori School in Switzerland

Available from: Massey University - Theses and Dissertations

Comparative education, Europe, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Switzerland, Western Europe

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Abstract/Notes: The main purpose of this study is to examine whether the age at which children start to learn to read affects their later progress - specifically, whether an earlier start at reading gives children an advantage when they enter first grade at the age of six years. The study was conducted in Zürich, Switzerland, and compared a first grade class in a local school with two first grade classes in a Montessori school. There were 42 participants aged between six and seven years, 22 girls and 20 boys. The children were given a series of alphabet knowledge, reading and phoneme tests at the beginning and end of the year to measure the reading progress of each group. It was found that although the Montessori children who had already attended the Montessori kindergarten had an advantage over the local children, this advantage was only significant for alphabet knowledge, and was not translated into a significant advantage in either phonemic awareness or reading ability. Reasons for this were considered including the relative efficiency with which children learned to read in German at the local school, possible failings in the Montessori instruction, and the fact that many of the local children had already learned to read at home before starting school something that may be related to the high socioeconomic status (SES) and home literacy environment (HLE) of both groups.

Language: English

Published: Palmerston North, New Zealand, 2015

Article

How Does the Montessori Child Adjust to Public School?: A Much Needed Study

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 4, no. 1

Pages: 8

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Language: English

Report

Evaluation of Early Childhood Education: A Model Cities-Supported Preschool Program

Academic achievement, Americas, Child development, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, North America, United States of America, Urban education

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Abstract/Notes: A Head Start Program operating in Kansas City since 1965 was viewed as inadequate because enrollment was limited to about 600 children per year. The Model Cities Agency determined to provide a program for the remainder of the children in the Model Cities neighborhoods. The programs developed were differentiated administratively for the purposes of this evaluation and the program considered a single entity and referred to as Early Childhood Education. These questions were developed as evaluation goals: What specific educational approaches were provided?; To what degree do the children grow to the stated objectives?; Do these programs meet the emotional, social, physical, and intellectual needs of the program's four-year-old children?; Do these children grow differentially?; Are specified goals reached as anticipated by staff?; What program differences account for student growth differences?; Do parents in the parent education component change relevant to their children's development?; Are these programs complementary with kindergarten programs of urban schools?; What are the effects of staff development activities?; Is program administration effective?; Are children with special problems provided assistance in achievement of program objectives?; And what program changes should be made? Each question is treated in succession and is detailed. Summaries giving the main thrust are provided after each section. (RC)

Language: English

Published: Kansas City, Missouri, Sep 1971

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