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219 results

Article

The Case for Lifelong Learning

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 31, no. 1

Pages: 9

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Growth is a critical goal for Montessori educators-the growth of our students, our prepared environments, our communities, and ourselves, the latter through professional development. (Montessori, 1995a, p. 62) Your Didactic Development Refine your understanding of the scope, sequence, and purpose of the Montessori materials and lesson presentations, and work to master the art of ongoing analytical observation and record keeping. Commit to new learning and stay energized: * Join the professional dialogue by attending AMS's signature annual gathering, The Montessori Event, and cultivating peer relationships. * Further your education by reading this magazine, professional books, and recent research relevant to Montessori education, as well as mainstream educational news and blogs.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Learning Through Performing: Musical Theater in the Elementary Montessori Classroom

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 27, no. 2

Pages: 44-49

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: [...]of these observations, and influenced by the teachings of Friedrich Froebel and Emile Jacques-Dalcroze, Montessori created a music curriculum that emphasized self-directed learning through instruments made specifically for children (Goodkin, 2002). Since we try to integrate musical theater into daily activities, rather than isolating this experience as an after-school program, we seek to choose shows that will highlight a unit or academic concept being taught in the classroom. Montessori was greatly opposed to teaching her students that imaginary characters, such as fairies or Santa Claus, exist (Montessori, 1997, p. 43). [...]we use musicals to continue building upon Montessori's philosophies of the purpose of schooling-to teach children about the real world, history, and social understanding (Montessori, 1964). [...]we imagine that she may have made accommodations for this growing art form, finding ways to integrate music, theater, and dance into her teaching and recognizing its importance within our communities and for our students.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

When Given a Choice . . . [Report on public lecture by Judi Orion]

Publication: Montessori Matters, no. 2

Pages: 19–20

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Abstract/Notes: Includes recipe for bread used in infant communities

Language: English

Article

Remembering Roslyn Davis Williams (1921–1997)

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 32, no. 3

Pages: 38-47

Obituaries, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: After the Brown v. Board of Education case, of 1954 (in which racial segregation in public schools was deemed unconstitutional), federal laws changed. Many private schools followed the public schools' lead in terms of integration, and this led many Montessori schools to announce a commitment to racial and ethnic diversity and social justice. ROSLYN DAViS WiLLiAMS' EARLY YEARS Roslyn Davis was born in 1921 and grew up in Harlem, the nexus of Black life in New York City. [...]the 1960s, many of New York City's residential communities remained closed to people of color. In 1962, the child psychologist Martin Deutsch, who was affiliated with the New York University Institute for Developmental Studies, started a small program in Harlem to train public school teachers to belie the then mainstream belief that poverty was a deterrent to learning.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Form Rosary School Board

Publication: The Oglala War Cry, vol. 1, no. 24

Pages: 1

Americas, Indigenous communities, Indigenous peoples, Montessori schools, North America, Oglala children, United States of America

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Language: English

Article

PCC News

Publication: The Oglala War Cry, vol. 1, no. 18

Pages: 5

Americas, Indigenous communities, Indigenous peoples, Montessori schools, North America, Oglala children, United States of America

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Language: English

Doctoral Dissertation

The Relationship Between Self-Concept and Stress of Elementary School Teachers Using Traditional and Montessori Methods of Teaching

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between self-concept and perceived levels of stress in the teaching profession at the elementary school level. The subjects of the study were teachers from two communities--Romulus, Michigan and Buffalo, New York. The subjects were chosen by the schools in which they taught and by the methods of teaching which they used. One-half of the total number of the subjects used traditional methods of teaching and one-half of the total number of the subjects used the Montessori Method of teaching. The responses of these teachers were gathered during the 1981 winter school term. The instruments used to gather the data for the study were the Tennessee Self Concept Scale, the Maslach Burnout Inventory, and a personal data questionnaire. The levels of self-concept of the subjects were taken as indicated by the means of the total positive scores of the Tennessee Self Concept Scale. The levels of the subjects' perceived stress were taken as indicated by the means from the Maslach Burnout Inventory in the areas of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal achievement. Pearson product-moment correlations were found to determine if a significant relationship existed between self-concept and the perceived stress of the subjects. Demographic data from the questionnaire were used to divide the subjects into categories which were investigated for significant differences. One way analyses of variance were performed of the self-concept and stress means of the categories to determine if significant differences existed. Statistical significance was chosen at the 0.05 alpha level. For the thirteen null hypotheses formulated and tested, it was concluded that the subjects indicating higher self-concept means, as measured by the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale, also indicated lower stress means, as indicated on the Maslach Burnout Inventory, in the areas of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, and higher means in the area of personal achievement. Null hypotheses formulated indicating no significant differences of stress or self-concept when the subjects were categorized by teaching methods, years of formal education, number of years of teaching experience, classroom racial dominance, number of students in the classroom, or marital status were all accepted. No significant differences were found at the 0.05 alpha level. The subjects of this study were shown to be similar in life style, education, and work environments. Further studies might bring to light differences if more varied teachers, teaching methods, and levels of education were taken into consideration. Replication of the study may also provide valuable information if performed with subjects from independent schools. A search for areas which the teachers feel are stress producing may also contribute to significant research.

Language: English

Published: Columbus, Ohio, 1981

Article

Moral Development: From Cosmic Education to Adolescent Action

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 42, no. 3

Pages: 31-41

Cosmic education, Elizabeth Henke - Writings

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Abstract/Notes: "The most essential component to offering the children an education for peace is the emphasis on that which unites us." With this focus, Elizabeth Henke presents a picture of how Montessori students progressively develop a sense of moral, civic, and social responsibility. The foundation is set during the elementary years when children gain an understanding of the interconnectedness of all life and the commonalities between all people through Cosmic Education. The morality developed in elementary is refined during adolescence and is aided by coursework that is focused on current ethical issues and opportunities to participate in their school, local, and global communities. As they begin to place themselves into the world by thinking of themselves as citizens of their community and components of culture, their work for the betterment of that world gains relevance. [This talk was presented at the NAMTA Adolescent Workshop at the AMI/ USA Refresher Course, February 17-20, 2017 in Austin, TX.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Contesting the Public School: Reconsidering Charter Schools as Counterpublics

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: American Educational Research Journal, vol. 53, no. 4

Pages: 919-952

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Abstract/Notes: Although technically open to all, charter schools often emphasize distinctive missions that appeal to particular groups of students and families. These missions, especially ones focusing on ethnic, linguistic, and cultural differences, also contribute to segregation between schools. Such schools raise normative questions about the aims of education. Are they a troubling retreat from an integrated public school system? Or are they new public spaces relevant to the needs of certain communities? Through a case study of one potentially counterpublic school, I describe how this school embodied aspects of public-ness. I argue that a counterpublic framework—in emphasizing shared decision making, expanded discursive space, and a publicist orientation—offers resources for considering under what circumstances distinctive schools might serve public goals.

Language: English

DOI: 10.3102/0002831216658972

ISSN: 0002-8312, 1935-1011

Doctoral Dissertation

Education as a Tool for Social Change: Case Study of an Arizona Inner-City Charter School

Available from: University of San Francisco

Social transformation

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Abstract/Notes: It is a very difficult task to provide adequate education in the United States for children living in an inner-city environment, with problems of poverty, minority status, drugs, crime, gangs, suicide, despair, and many single-parent households. This is a Case Study of how one Arizona inner-city poverty community has risen to answer these educational demands for its children through a Montessori theory-based Charter Pre-12 school. The 650 student population served in this school is approximately 80% Hispanic American, 12% African American, and 8% Native, Asian and European American. Data were gathered from extensive interviews, observations, and document analysis. They were analyzed and evaluated in three ways: first, according to a literature review of the educational theories of Maria Montessori, then according to those of Paulo Freire, and lastly, according to a review of Charter school books, articles, and government documents available up to January of 2000. The results were an in-depth description of first, the history of this community's needs, its struggle to establish and fund the school, then the resulting educational program which it developed and implemented, and lastly, the community's positive evaluation of it's efforts. The curriculum described had extensive use of ESL and cultural appreciation programs, hands-on student initiated and student-implemented programs, integrated curriculum and critical thinking programs, job-skills related programs, self-esteem and character development programs, and Sustainable Systems Ecology Education demonstration programs. All these findings were presented in a manner which could be useful to other Administrators, who might desire to use this school's example to begin or to improve their own programs for a similarly disadvantaged inner-city population. Conclusions were that after five years of operation, this community empowerment school has indeed found methods, curriculum and programs that have successfully helped to meet the emotional, cultural, moral, and educational needs of the children in this particular poverty community. Conclusions were also that this community's experiences are valuable and appropriate for examination by other prospective Charter school Administrators from similar communities.

Language: English

Published: San Francisco, California, 2000

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