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43 results

Article

Academia bilingüe de Denver sirve de modelo para escuelas en reservaciones indígenas [Denver Bilingual Academy serves as a model for schools on Indian reservations]

Available from: Independent Voices

Publication: La Voz Hispana de Colorado, vol. 28, no. 13

Pages: 20

Americas, Bilingualism, Indigenous communities, North America, North America, United States of America

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Language: Spanish

Article

Multilingualism in a Montessori Preschool: A Study of Language Variability in a Linguistically Diverse Preschool Programme

Available from: IndianJournals

Publication: Journal of Exclusion Studies, vol. 9, no. 2

Pages: 111-131

Asia, Bilingualism, India, Multilingualism, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: This article is based on a study of an ‘English-medium’ preschool programme for underprivileged children. The diverse linguistic backgrounds of the teachers and students prompted an enquiry into how multiple languages would be negotiated in the setting and how comprehension, learning and communication would occur given that none of the children came from English-speaking homes. The article identifies and interprets key features of verbal language that were observed in the setting and articulates implications for educational practice.

Language: English

DOI: 10.5958/2231-4555.2019.00009.3

ISSN: 2231-4547, 2231-4555

Honors Thesis

The Seneca Language and Bilingual Road Signs: A Study in the Sociology of an Indigenous Language

Available from: Ohio State University - Knowledge Bank

Americas, Bilingualism, Indigenous communities, North America, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: One of the fundamental types of human rights concerns collective-developmental rights which allow minorities to use heritage languages and practices without external interference (Vašák 1977). The protected status of minority language rights is a critical part of language revitalization in which speakers of heritage languages, faced with the encroachment of more socially, politically, and economically dominant languages, embark on vigorous programs to ensure the survival and continued usage of their language. The Five Nations Iroquoian language, Seneca, has just a few remaining speech communities and a variety of ongoing language revitalization initiatives (Mithun 2012). To revitalize their traditional language, community classes through the Seneca Language Department and the Faithkeepers Montessori School Seneca Language Nest for young speakers have concentrated their efforts on preserving Onöndowa'ga:' Gawë:nö' the indigenous name for the Seneca language (Bowen 2020, Murray 2015). In the public sphere, a push by the Seneca Nation of Indians Department of Transportation fulfilling the intent of the federal Native American Tourism and Improving Visitor Experience (NATIVE) Act enacted in 2016, specifically included bilingual signs for state roads running through indigenous land in addition to other significant components (Figura 2016). In an area whose geographic names are strongly connected to Iroquoian languages including Seneca, these bilingual signs represent more public and visible Seneca language presence and stand as symbols of language revitalization. The place names and information that appear on the signs have considerable significance for community identity as well as linguistic and economic impacts, among others. Through oral histories collected from Seneca Nation members and language advocates in addition to a representative from the New York State Department of Transportation, this study pursues an analysis of the Seneca public usage of their heritage language and the various language revitalization efforts occurring among indigenous and minority communities internationally. As the COVID-19 pandemic threatens already vulnerable populations, heritage languages that have been historically oppressed face a global language crisis that disproportionately harms and disadvantages speakers of heritage and minority languages (Roche 2020). While the language of road signs may seem mundane, this study reveals how the Seneca bilingual signs play a significant role in awareness of indigenous territory and consequently stimulation of the local economy as well as supporting language learning, revitalization, and de-stigmatization. Primarily through the efforts of the Seneca community, the bilingual signs represent the expression of language rights in the public sphere and one part of the ongoing language revitalization.

Language: English

Published: Columbus, Ohio, 2021

Article

Task-based Language Learning in Bilingual Montessori Elementary Schools: Customizing Foreign Language Learning and Promoting L2 Speaking Skills

Available from: Universität Bern (Switzerland)

Publication: Linguistik Online, vol. 54, no. 4

Pages: 69-83

Bilingualism, Language acquisition

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Abstract/Notes: Foreign language learning has been a part of German elementary schools for several years now. Montessori schools focusing on individual learning, i.e. mostly independent from the teacher and based on auto-education, interest, and free choice, are also asked to teach an L2. The original lack of a concept of L2 learning for this environment has brought forth different approaches. Bilingual education seems to be feasible and applicable in Montessori education. The downside to this is that even in a bilingual classroom the Montessori way of learning may not allow for very much oral production of the foreign language. The role of L2 production (cf. Swain 1985, 1995, 2005) for language acquisition has been theoretically claimed and empirically investigated. Output can have a positive influence on L2 learning (cf. e.g. Izumi 2002, Keck et al. 2006). This also applies to interaction (cf. Long 1996), where negotiation of meaning and modified output are factors supporting L2 development (cf. e.g. de la Fuente 2002, McDonough 2005). Task-based Language Learning (TBLL) presents itself as one way to promote oral language production and to provide opportunities for meaning-negotiation. Especially tasks with required information exchange and a closed outcome have been shown to be beneficial for the elicitation of negotiation of meaning and modified output. This paper argues that TBLL is a promising approach for the facilitation of L2 production and thus the development of speaking skills in a Montessori context. It also hypothesizes that TBLL can be implemented in a bilingual Montessori environment while still making the Montessori way of learning possible. Different tasks on various topics, examples of which are presented in this article, can lay the foundation for this. Offering such tasks in a bilingual Montessori elementary classroom promises to foster language production and the use of communication strategies like negotiation of meaning, both being facilitative for L2 acquisition. This hypothesis remains to be tested in future research.

Language: German

DOI: 10.13092/lo.54.284

ISSN: 1615-3014

Article

Teaching English as an Additional Language

Publication: Montessori International, vol. 87

Pages: 11–13

Bilingualism, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 1470-8647

Article

Montessorians in the Classroom, Part 1: French as a Second Language

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: The Constructive Triangle (1974-1989), vol. 12, no. 3

Pages: 9–10

Bilingualism

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Language: English

ISSN: 0010-700X

Article

Assisting in Mme. Piha's Upper Elementary French Program

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: The Constructive Triangle (1974-1989), vol. 12, no. 3

Pages: 10–11

Bilingualism, Upper elementary

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Language: English

ISSN: 0010-700X

Article

Teaching French with Montessori Part 3: The Montessori Games Adapted to the Language Class

Publication: Montessori International, vol. 10, no. 3

Pages: 28–29

Bilingualism, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 1470-8647

Article

Teaching French with Montessori Part 2: The Lessons

Publication: Montessori International, vol. 10, no. 2

Pages: 36–38

Bilingualism, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 1470-8647

Article

Teaching French with Montessori Part 1: The Influential Material

Publication: Montessori International, vol. 10, no. 1

Pages: 32–33

Bilingualism, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 1470-8647

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