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305 results

Article

Het kindvolgsysteem voor het Montessori-onderwijs?

Publication: MM: Montessori mededelingen, vol. 23, no. 2

Pages: 21-22

Academic achievement, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Montessori method of education, Teacher-student relationships, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: Dutch

ISSN: 0166-588X

Article

Het volgen van leerlingen

Publication: MM: Montessori mededelingen, vol. 23, no. 2

Pages: 17-19

Academic achievement, Montessori method of education, Teacher-student relationships

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Language: Dutch

ISSN: 0166-588X

Article

Het Montessori kindvolgsysteem

Publication: MM: Montessori mededelingen, vol. 23, no. 2

Pages: 23

Academic achievement, Assessment, Montessori method of education, Teacher-student relationships, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: Dutch

ISSN: 0166-588X

Article

Montessori Partners Serving All Children: An Outreach Initiative of the Montessori Center of Minnesota

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 39, no. 2

Pages: 93-100

Academic achievement, Child development, Cognitive development, Early childhood education, Elementary education, Montessori method of education, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori Partners Serving All Children is endorsed in terms of economic development as a statistically proven return for the money, leadership, parent education, institutional partners, and a sense of community in preparing teachers to serve families with a hub of resources through Montessori Center of Minnesota. Assessment is also integral to the team in terms of children's academic skills, cognitive, social, emotional, and physical growth and is aligned with school structures such as administration, professional development, and technical assistance. [This talk was presented at the NAMTA conference titled "Montessori from Birth to Six: In Search of Community Values," (Minneapolis, MN, Nov 7-10, 2013).]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

What Research Really Says

Publication: Principal, vol. 75, no. 4

Pages: 41, 43

Educational change, Language experience approach in education, Nongraded schools

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Abstract/Notes: Compares 1960s and 1970s research findings positing a strong academic-achievement/socioeconomic-status correlation with 1980s school-effectiveness research and recent studies advocating whole language, cooperative learning, and multiage grouping. Since there's research to support numerous practices and beliefs, educators must resist fads, quick fixes, and hard-sell reform packages.

Language: English

ISSN: 0271-6062

Book Section

A Comparison of Multi-Age and Homogeneous Age Grouping in Early Childhood Centers

Available from: ERIC

Book Title: Current Topics in Early Childhood Education

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Abstract/Notes: Studies from several countries are described in this review of literature pertinent to assigning day care children to multi-age or homogeneous age groups. Three issues are discussed in this regard: (1) What difference does it make how one groups children? The answer is that a profound difference to children, staff, and parents may occur in terms of social environment, curriculum design, success at school, and other factors. (2) What aspects of the child's development are affected by age grouping? The answer is that multi-age grouping positively influences social, emotional, and some learning outcomes, whereas homogeneous grouping seems to produce mastery of academic skills. Success of particular grouping choices depends on the end desired and on the skills of staff members. (3) How does age grouping affect the achievement of preschool goals? The answer to this question ultimately can be provided only by a center's staff and the families being served. Because research is still being conducted on the effects of grouping children under 6 years of age, the decision to place children in multi-age or homogeneous groups depends on program goals, client characteristics, center resources, and staff training and inclinations.

Language: English

Published: Norwood, New Jersey: Ablex, 1982

ISBN: 978-0-89391-109-6

Volume: 4

Article

Nongraded and Mixed-Age Grouping in Early Childhood Programs

Available from: ERIC

Publication: ERIC Digest

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: A confusing variety of terms is used in discussions of age grouping practices. This digest examines terms that have important implications for teaching and the curriculum. The terms "nongraded" and "ungraded" typically refer to grouping children in classes without grade-level designations and with more than a 1-year age span. The term "combined classes" refers to the inclusion of more than one grade level in a classroom. The term "continuous progress" generally implies that children remain with their classroom peers in an age cohort regardless of whether they have met prespecified grade-level achievement expectations. The terms "mixed-age" and "multi-age grouping" refer to grouping children so that the age span of the class is greater than 1 year, as in the nongraded or ungraded approach. These terms are used to emphasize the goal of using teaching practices that maximize the benefits of cooperation among children of various ages. The distinctions between the grouping practices have

Language: English

Report

The Effects of Montessori Educational Techniques on Culturally Disadvantaged Head Start Children

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: To determine whether significant differences exist in skill performance as a result of head start experience and to determine whether these differences exist between two ethnic groups, 17 Anglo-American [White] and 62 Mexican American [Latino] culturally disadvantaged children were pre-tested and post-tested during the summer of 1965 in connection with six-week head start programs in Costa Mesa and Fullerton, California. Five teachers using modified Montessori materials stressed three developmental areas, (1) perceptual-motor, (2) social-emotional, and (3) intellectual-academic. Seven instruments were used to test the program's effectiveness--Gesell Maturation Index, Mateer Inversion Test, tests of dominance, teacher rating scale, Goodenough-Harris D-A-P, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, and wide range achievement test. Results showed that certain handicaps do exist among culturally disadvantaged children prior to school experience and that positive gains occurred when enrichment experiences were provided. Greatest gains were in the areas of intellectual-academic and social-emotional skills. Ethnic differences appeared in the linguistic skills limitations of the Mexican American children. Need for medical and dental attention was apparent in both groups. Future provision should be made for continued preschool education and wider dissemination of health services. (LG)

Language: English

Published: Fullerton, California, Sep 1965

Book

Changing Faces of Reform: Proceedings, Eighteenth Annual Rural and Small Schools Conference (October 27-28, 1996) [Manhattan, Kansas]

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: This proceedings contains abstracts of 21 presentations. Titles and presenters are: "Teaching and Learning in Multiage Classrooms" (Laura Blevins and others); "Leadership, School Reform and the Rural School Superintendent" (Mike Boone); "Teaching English as a Second Language from Theory to Practice" (Mingsheng Dai); "A Guide for Central Office Leaders for Implementing Systemic Continuous Improvement" (Kathy Dale, Alfred P. Wilson); "The Greening of a School District" (Kathy Dale, Alfred P. Wilson); "Character Construction Crew" (Bob Goodwin and others); "What the 'Arts in Education' Program Can Do for Your School: The Case of Wayne Wildcat" (Jim Hillesheim, Eric Hayashi, Wayne Wildcat); "After School Achievement" (Scott Hills); "Stakeholders' Evaluation of Rural/Small Schools" (Jerry G. Horn); "Preparing for the Changing Workplace: Helping Students Learn To Manage Their Careers" (Kenneth F. Hughey); "Communicating on the Web: Designing Pages for Visual Clarity" (Nancy Nelson Knupfer and others); "Harnessing the Internet: Applying Its Power to Rural Schools" (Nancy Nelson Knupfer); "Creating Cross-Platform Multimedia: Potentials and Pitfalls" (Judy E. Mahoney, William J. Rust); "The Increase of Anti-Social Behavior and Its Effect on Rural Classrooms" (Marjorie B. Pace, J. E. Potterfield); "Ethnic Groups, Diversity and Multicultural Understanding" (Richard Rangel); "Preparing Rural School Administrators" (Jan Reynolds); "Ethical Considerations of Internet Access" (Tweed W. Ross); "Alternate Education in Rural Communities" (Kerry Sachetta, David Rockers);"Developing Responsible Students: A Team Approach" (Frank Shaughnessy); "Population Change and Its Effect on Rural and Small Schools" (G. Kent Stewart); and "Process Skills in Secondary Family and Consumer Sciences Curriculum" (Sally J. Yahnke). Presenters' institutional affiliations are included. (SV)

Language: English

Published: [S.I.]: [s.n.], Oct 1996

Conference Paper

Age Segregation in Schools

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Abstract/Notes: Evidence from ethnology, anthropology, and educational history and research indicates that age segregation is neither necessary nor natural. An examination of primate and simple human societies suggests that rigid assumptions about age segregation of the young is a recent departure from social patterns existing for millions of years. The researcher summarizes the findings of 27 empirical studies in multiage grouping in elementary schools conducted between 1948 and 1981 in the United States and Canada: multiage grouping has no consistent relationship with academic achievement, and multiage grouping has a generally benign effect on social and emotional development. Naturalistic and observational studies on companionship outside the classroom provide further evidence on the importance of cross-age grouping. The general pattern that emerges from these studies is one of increased competition and aggression within same-age groups and increased harmony and nurturance within more natural

Language: English

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