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Book Section

World Illiteracy

Book Title: The Formation of Man

Pages: 71-96

Maria Montessori - Writings, Reading

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Abstract/Notes: Includes the following sections: Man and Animals; The Function of the Child; The Spiritual Embryo; The Absorbent Mind; Adaptation; Contact with the World; Conclusions

Language: English

Published: Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Montessori-Pierson Publishing Company, 2007

ISBN: 978-90-79506-15-6

Series: The Montessori Series , 3

Book Section

Analysis of the Characteristics of Children Implicit in the Montessori Method

Book Title: Early Childhood Education Rediscovered: Readings

Pages: 96-101

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Language: English

Published: New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1968

Book Section

An Evaluation of the Montessori Method in Schools for Young Children

Book Title: Early Childhood Education Rediscovered: Readings

Pages: 92-96

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Language: English

Published: New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1968

Book Section

Montessori Revisited

Book Title: Early Childhood Education Rediscovered: Readings

Pages: 102-127

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Language: English

Published: New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1968

Doctoral Dissertation

A Single-Subject Multiple Baseline and Feminist Intertextual Deconstruction of Gender Differences Among Kindergartners in Learning the Alphabet Using Clay and a Tactual/Kinesthetic Multiple Intelligence and Montessori Pedagogy

Available from: Texas Tech University

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Abstract/Notes: This multimethod study involved quantitative procedures to measure to what extent a tactual/kinesthetic art approach using clay would help low achieving or developmentally delayed kindergarten students learn the alphabet (a pre-reading skill). Data collected at each session ranged from twenty to twenty-five meetings per child over a period of ten weeks occurred within a single subject, multiple baseline design. Qualitative data collection and analysis revealed differences in participants' reactions to, preferences for, and processes with clay such as expressing their lives, dreams, stories, beliefs, and fears. Analysis of social interactions, student self-initiated practices, and variations of the interventions (i.e., clay play personifying letters, ABC book, songs, associations, images on cards, and artworks) suggested that gender differences occurred more strongly when clothing differentiated gender, and in the types of stories told, but not in the clay processes initiated. I began the study with 18 participants, selected by their teachers, using the criterion that the student could not identify more than 17 alphabet letters. The findings are based on the 10 remaining students who were not able to name more than 17 letters after five baseline sessions. The baseline sessions consisted of recording students' recognition of lower-case alphabet letters. If a child did not recognize a letter, I implemented the tactual/kinesthetic clay instruction, a multiple intelligences pedagogical approach influenced by Montessori methods. The intervention of forming with clay was implemented at staggered times across groups of letters (three letters at a time) for each participant. The participant's recognition of the distinctive features of a letter demonstrated progress in learning a new letter. An intervention of a tactual/kinesthetic art approach using clay did improve all of the participant's abilities to recognize, learn, and remember letters. The findings support the theory that kinesthetic/tactile perception is a primary channel for early learning. In spite of the apparent importance of kinesthetic methods, multisensory learning, and manipulative materials, few programs that incorporate kinesthetic/tactile pedagogy. Interdisciplinary arts-based teaching addresses the multiple intelligences of individual children and their different learning styles.

Language: English

Published: Lubbock, Texas, 2002

Book Section

The Fifth Woman: Maria Montessori

Available from: Springer Link

Book Title: America's Early Montessorians: Anne George, Margaret Naumburg, Helen Parkhurst and Adelia Pyle

Pages: 37-57

Americas, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Chapter two presents a biography of Maria Montessori and describes the key elements in her method when George, Naumburg, Pyle, and Parkhurst were students in her training courses. By 1910, Montessori had constructed the core features of her educational theory, known as the Montessori Method. Her educational theory was based on her medical education at the University of Rome, her work with children with mental disabilities, her intensive reading of the pioneer special education educators, Itard and Sequin, pedagogical anthropology and her first school, the Casa dei Bambini, in 1908, in Rome’s impoverished San Lorenzo district. Montessori’s view of the child holistically encompassed physical, sensory, muscular, social, intellectual, and moral development. All children, she believed, like all people, shared a universal human nature which led to common modes of development. Focusing on early childhood education, ages three to six, Montessori’s key principles were: children need liberty to fulfill their inner need to develop fully through their own self-, or auto-education; their self-education is optimal in a prepared structured learning environment with accessible didactic apparatus and material which they are free to choose and work out their own self- development; the first level of instruction develops sensory, muscular, and practical skills which lead to higher level cognitive, cultural, and literary skills. Montessori was recognized as an educational innovator in Europe but not widely known in the United States. George, Naumburg, Pyle, and Parkhurst played significant roles in introducing Montessori to Americans and in implementing the Montessori Method in the United States.

Language: English

Published: Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan, 2020

ISBN: 978-3-030-54835-3

Series: Historical Studies in Education

Article

Pour l'Ère nouvelle (1922-1940): La science convoquée pour fonder une «internationale de l'éducation» [For the New Era (1922-1940): Science called upon to found an "international education"]

Available from: CAIRN

Publication: Carrefours de l'education, no. 31

Pages: 137-159

Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., New Education Fellowship, New Ideals in Education

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Abstract/Notes: La revue Pour l’Ère nouvelle constitue un observatoire privilégié pour cerner la nature des initiatives prises par les tenants de l’éducation nouvelle pour mobiliser, par delà les frontières, tous les amis de l’enfance afin d’améliorer l’humanité par une meilleure connaissance de l’enfant. En tant que lieu d’échange, elle permet à ses protagonistes d’y faire connaître leurs convictions et expériences favorisant ainsi la construction et la diffusion de connaissances au-delà de la francophonie. Nous nous proposons plus concrètement d’éprouver la thèse du cosmopolitisme et de la communauté d’esprits (convergence/divergence) des promoteurs de l’éducation nouvelle, en étudiant comment, dans Pour l’Ère nouvelle, ses auteurs invoquent la science pour fonder leurs thèses et si cette invocation fait l’objet de tensions ou controverses parmi eux. Cet article s’inscrit dans le sillage de recherches menées sur les relations entre éducation nouvelle et sciences de l’éducation, par nombre de chercheurs, notamment par ERHISE (Equipe de recherche en histoire des sciences de l’éducation). [The journal Pour l’Ère nouvelle is a privileged observation post from which one can define the initiatives promoted by the leaders of the New Education movement. They seek to mobilize, over frontiers, the actors involved in the study of childhood, aiming to ameliorate humanity through a better knowledge concerning that question. As a place of interaction, it allows its protagonists to bring their convictions and experiences to others, favouring development and spreading of knowledge beyond French speaking community. In this article, we propose to test the theory of the New Educationalist’s cosmopolitism and community of minds (convergence/ divergence) and to see how, Pour l’Ère nouvelle’s authors use science to base their theories and, further, we propose to see if this position arouses tensions or controversies. This article is part of a research undertaken by ERHISE (Research Team in History of Sciences of Education).]

Language: French

DOI: 10.3917/cdle.031.0137

ISSN: 1262-3490

Article

McClure's and Montessori: A Complicated Connection

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 31, no. 4

Pages: 61

American Montessori Society (AMS) - Periodicals, Americas, McClure's Magazine, North America, United States of America, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: S. S. MCCLURE, MARIA MONTESSORI, AND THE CAMPAIGN TO PUBLICIZE MONTESSORI EDUCATION by Gerald L. Gutek and Patricia A. Gutek 2016, The University of Alabama Press Paperback, 280 pages $29.95 Historians and authors Gerald and Patricia Gutek have written a well-researched, detailed account of the introduction, in the early 20th century, of Montessori and her method to the United States. The book lays out these distinctions very clearly in an attempt to answer a number of questions, including if Montessori sought deliberately to utilize McClure's Magazine to disseminate her method and if McClure used his affiliation with Montessori for profit and to assist in pulling himself out of near bankruptcy. In the midst of the chaos brought on by the restructuring of the magazine and his financial troubles, McClure learned about Maria Montessori and her method, and saw it as a possible way out of his fiscal difficulties, resulting in a series of articles in McClure's Magazine by Josephine Tozier (1911) that highlighted aspects of Montessori's ideas, focusing on the early writing and reading levels achieved by children in her Casa dei Bambini.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Tracing Enhances Problem-Solving Transfer, but Without Effects on Intrinsic or Extraneous Cognitive Load

Available from: Wiley Online Library

Publication: Applied Cognitive Psychology, vol. 34, no. 6

Pages: 1522-1529

Montessori materials

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Abstract/Notes: People can make pointing gestures and tracing actions with the index finger with little or no conscious effort. From the perspective of cognitive load theory, such “biologically primary” gestures and actions might help people learn “biologically secondary” concepts and skills requiring extended cognitive effort, such as reading, science, or mathematics. Studies on tracing or tracing and pointing have yielded mixed findings regarding hypothesized effects on intrinsic and extraneous cognitive load. The present study investigated whether computer-based instructions to trace elements of worked examples on angle relationships would affect school students' (N = 106) self-reports of intrinsic and extraneous cognitive load, as well as problem-solving transfer test performance. The tracing effect on transfer posttests seen in prior studies was replicated, but cognitive load hypotheses were not supported. Implications for educational practice and future research are discussed.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1002/acp.3732

ISSN: 1099-0720

Article

Be Happy

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 25, no. 1

Pages: 44-45

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: The author has been thinking a lot about happiness lately. This started in earnest when she watched researcher Shawn Achor's 7-minute TEDX talk, entitled "The Happy Secret to Better Work," with parents and staff. Afterward, she was compelled to buy his book to learn more. "The Happiness Advantage: The Seven Principles of Positive Psychology That Fuel Success and Performance at Work," based on Achor's work at Harvard and companies worldwide, goes into detail about how people can all be happier and more fulfilled. Reading it, the author was struck by how Achor's principles are embedded in Montessori philosophy and curriculum. Once again, Montessori proves to be cutting edge, even 100 years later! Presented in this article are some thoughts on a few of Achor's principles on happiness and how they relate to Montessori.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

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