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Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Relationship Between Using Conceptual Language and the Depth of Student Understanding of Dynamic Addition and Multiplication in 4-9-Year-Old Montessori Students

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: This study aims to bring clarity to the relationship between procedural mathematical work and abstracted math learning when carrying in addition and multiplication. To explore this relationship, researchers employed both quantitative and qualitative data tools that unearthed the nuances within this specific process of math learning. Participants in the study included twenty-nine students from two different schools in different mixed age groups including ages three-to-six-years-old and six-to-nine-years-old. Students participated in a six-week intervention process, working on dynamic addition and multiplication using conceptual mathematical language to support the process. The findings indicate an overall two-point increase across learning variables post intervention. The conclusion of this study implores the broader educational community to revisit systemic, procedural math learning processes. In the future, we must question the finality of manipulatives and their place in the continuum of authentic math learning.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2019

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Peer Tutoring and Cooperative Groups in the Dual Language Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: How do we help children practice and retain the second language in a Dual Language program? We must find effective and fun ways, like Peer Tutoring and Cooperative Groups. This research was conducted with a group of 21 six and seven year olds in a Dual Language Immersion classroom in a Title 1 school. There was a mixture of boys and girls, Latinos, African-Americans and Caucasians. Data collection was done through surveys, observations, artifacts and narratives. The data showed that while these strategies did increase vocabulary, they did not inspire the children to speak more Spanish. They still reverted back to speaking in English. Based on my findings, students require more vocabulary and would benefit from more opportunities to practice it.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2016

Article

English Language History

Publication: AMI Elementary Alumni Association Newsletter, vol. 27, no. 1

Pages: 7–8

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Language: English

Doctoral Dissertation

Language Learning and Technology in and for a Global World

Available from: University of California eScholarship

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Abstract/Notes: More than ever before, schools and societies are looking to educate children in and for a global world. In the United States, these efforts have taken the form of increased interest in incorporating global or international perspectives into educational curricula, programs, and policy over the past decade (Hayden, 2011; Parker, 2011; U.S. Department of Education, 2012). Despite this interest in what I call global education, ambiguity remains regarding what it means to provide an education for a globalized world, both in terms of its underlying motivations and its ultimate execution in practice (Ortloff, Shah, Lou, & Hamilton, 2012).Two components often placed at the heart of these efforts in the United States—second/foreign language and digital technology—both reflect and contribute to understandings of global education. This study, rooted in an ecological theorization of discourse, asked how different school actors (teachers, administrators, parents, and students) position these two components in education today, how these positionings differ across groups, and what this means for understandings of global education. These questions were investigated through two complementary approaches: a survey distributed to a large cross-section of schools around the United States and an in-depth focal case study of one school. The survey was distributed to teachers, students, parents, and administrators at a broad range of U.S. secondary schools and assessed perceptions of second/foreign language and digital technology in education today. The focal case study focused on two secondary classrooms at a multilingual immersion K-8 school in the western US over a four-month period; data collection included field notes, analytic memos, and audio/video recordings from participant observations as well as multiple rounds of interviews with five students, four teachers, two administrators, and three parents. Data were analyzed using iterative rounds of inductive and deductive coding (Miles & Huberman, 1994; Saldaña, 2009) and critical discourse analysis (Blommaert, 2005; Fairclough, 2001).Findings suggest that second/foreign language and digital technology were positioned in a range of different ways that had concrete ramifications for schools and that built up divergent understandings of global education. The survey component of the study highlighted common discourses reproduced across groups, including: second/foreign language learning as a way to promote cultural understanding and awareness as well as economic opportunity; or digital technology as a threat to learning and as an omnipresent necessity. The focal school offered a more detailed look into these different discourses and their reproduction across groups. Analysis revealed trended similarities and differences across groups. For example, even though parents, teachers, and administrators often articulated a similar understanding of second/foreign language and digital technology, parental actions suggested more alignment with economic-based understandings of these two components. These differences in how second/foreign language and digital technology should be positioned within a global education created a “battle” between parents and the focal school as well as tension within the learning environment. The impact of these discourses and battles on students was unclear: while students at times voiced the discourses that their parents, teachers, and administrators reproduced, data also suggests that students were influenced by outside sources. These findings suggest that resulting understandings of global education were multiple and divergent across school groups. Data analysis also revealed the potential that anxiety, concern, or even fear of globalization and its effects could undergird adult understandings of second/foreign language and of digital technology: beneath economic as well as cultural motivations for second/foreign language and for digital technology learning resided trepidation about a changing world, changing identities, and the unknowns that lay ahead. This suggests that, underneath multiple and complex discourses, there can be a singular discourse that manifests in different ways, nuancing understandings of ecological approaches to discourse. It also suggests that different understandings of global education could stem from the same place: fear or anxiety in the face of a globalizing world. These findings highlight the need for a global education that equips students to navigate a changing world, its challenges, and any potential fears that may arise from these changes and challenges. The study concludes with a pedagogical framework built around discourse analysis that could offer students tools to understand their globalizing world.

Language: English

Published: Berkeley, California, 2017

Doctoral Dissertation

El Método Montessori en el Desarrollo de la Expresión Oral del Idioma Inglés [The Montessori Method in the Development of Oral Expression of the English Language]

Available from: Universidad Central del Ecuador - Repositorio Digital

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Abstract/Notes: El presente proyecto de investigación se realizó con el objetivo de analizar la manera en que el Método Montessori contribuye al desarrollo de la expresión oral del Idioma Inglés en los niños de Educación Inicial del Centro Educativo Margarita Naseau en el periodo 2019-2020. El sustento teórico se orientó en la aplicación educativa, materiales didácticos, rol del docente y la enseñanza del idioma inglés. Por lo tanto, el proyecto tiene un enfoque cuali-cuantitativo, de carácter descriptivo y a su vez correlacional, bajo la modalidad socioeducativa que corresponde a una investigación aplicada porque se basa en datos reales. Las técnicas aplicadas en esta investigación fueron encuesta a los docentes y lista de cotejo a los estudiantes del Centro Educativo con el objetivo de determinar cómo el método Montessori contribuye al desarrollo de la expresión oral del idioma Inglés en los estudiantes. Una vez realizado el análisis e interpretación de resultados se concluyó que la aplicación del Método Montessori así como ayuda al niño a ser independiente también lo ayuda aprender diferentes idiomas y además se determinó la importancia que tiene para mejorar la expresión oral. La propuesta en base a los resultados es la elaboración de una guía de actividades lúdicas que incluye la aplicación del Método Montessori y los diferentes materiales a utilizarse.

Language: Spanish

Published: Quito, Ecuador, 2020

Archival Material Or Collection

Box 14, Folder 2 - Notebooks, ca. 1929-1940 - "Grammar Development as part of Language for Young Children"

Available from: Seattle University

Edwin Mortimer Standing - Biographic sources, Edwin Mortimer Standing - Writings

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Language: English

Archive: Seattle University, Lemieux Library and McGoldrick Learning Commons, Special Collections

Archival Material Or Collection

Box 16, Folder 11 - Notes, ca. 1929-1948 - "Maths" [Decimals; Arithmetic; Education for Democracy; Fractions; Two Points;Dominated by History; S. Periods in Development; Language; Seasonal Materials; Study of Numbers, Triangles; Teaching Religion; Geography, Geometry, Money Sums, Literature; Multiplication; Fractions, Teaching Notes; Mathematics; Groups]

Available from: Seattle University

Edwin Mortimer Standing - Biographic sources, Edwin Mortimer Standing - Writings

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Language: English

Archive: Seattle University, Lemieux Library and McGoldrick Learning Commons, Special Collections

Book Section

Beyond Day Care: Full-Day Montessori for Migrant and Other Language-Minority Children

Available from: Books to Borrow @ Internet Archive

Book Title: Montessori in Contemporary American Culture

Pages: 215-228

Americas, Displaced communities, Montessori method of education, North America, Refugees, United States of America

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Language: English

Published: Portsmouth, New Hampshire: Heinemann, 1992

ISBN: 0-435-08709-6 978-0-435-08709-8

Book Section

Written Language: The Old Methods of Teaching Reading and Writing; My First Experiments with Defective Children; First Experiments with Normal Children

Book Title: The Discovery of the Child

Pages: 199-216

Maria Montessori - Writings

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Abstract/Notes: Formerly entitled The Montessori Method: Scientific Pedagogy as Applied to Child Education in the Children's Houses. This book was first published in 1909 under the title 'Il Metodo della Pedagogia Scientifica Applicato all'Educazione Infantile nelle Case dei Bambini' ('The Montessori Method: Scientific Pedagogy as Applied to Child Education in the Children's Houses) and was revised in 1913, 1926, and 1935. Maria Montessori revised and reissued this book in 1948 and renamed it 'La Scoperta del Bambino'. This edition is based on the 6th Italian edition of 'La Scoperta del Bambino' published by the Italian publisher Garzanti, Milan, Italy in 1962. M. J. Costelloe, S. J. translated this Italian version into the English language in 1967 for Fides Publishers, Inc. In 2016 Fred Kelpin edited this version and added many footnotes. He incorporated new illustrations based on AMI-blueprints of the materials currently in use.

Language: English

Published: Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Montessori-Pierson Publishing Company, 2017

ISBN: 978-90-79506-38-5

Series: The Montessori Series , 2

Book Section

Some Thoughts on Language

Book Title: The Absorbent Mind

Pages: 97-104

Language acquisition, Maria Montessori - Writings

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Abstract/Notes: The first edition of 'The Absorbent Mind' was published in English by Kalakshetra (Madras, India) in 1949. In 1952, Montessori wrote a fully revised edition in Italian, published by Garzanti in 1952. This was the first Italian edition, entitled 'La Mente del Bambino'. This current edition is a translation by Claude Claremont of the Italian 1952 edition.

Language: English

Published: Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Montessori-Pierson Publishing Company, 2007

Series: The Montessori Series , 1

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