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549 results

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Efficacy of Community Building in Adult Online Learning Environments

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Montessori method of education - Study and teaching, Montessori method of education - Teacher training

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Abstract/Notes: This qualitative research study was conducted during synchronous class sessions with adult learners enrolled in an online Montessori teacher education program. The aim was to determine which techniques were being used to facilitate adult learning in an online learning environment. The research collected data through data tools designed to record the observed behaviors of participants engaged in online synchronous class sessions. The data revealed the use of learning techniques beneficial to developing self-confidence, community building, and knowledge acquisition by utilizing qualitative and quantitative research methods. This study can serve as a framework for future research projects focusing on adult learning methods and techniques that will positively impact adult learners’ experience in online learning environments. This study provided evidence that supports techniques that focus on supporting and encouraging adult learners to build self-confidence while cultivating a supportive community of learners. Overall, having synchronous class sessions appear to be beneficial to the building of community, self-confidence of the adult learners, and worthwhile use of time to evaluate the effectiveness of learning in online environments. Synchronous class sessions, accompanied by asynchronous activities of adult learners, are a very effective way of educating future teachers in the Montessori method.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2022

Book

Adaptiivisuus oppimisympäristön rakentessa ja interaktiossa [Adaptability in learning environment's structure and interactions]

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Language: Finnish

Published: Kajaani, FInland: Kajaaani opettajankoulutuslaitos, 1995

ISBN: 951-42-4318-8

Series: Olulun yliopiston Kajaanin opettajankoulutuslaitoksen julkaisuja

Doctoral Dissertation (Ph.D.)

Architecture and Students' Physical Activity in Learning Environments

Available from: University of Notre Dame Australia

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Language: English

Published: Fremantle, Western Australia, Australia, 2022

Article

Waseca's Focus: Building Better Biomes [Sharon Duncan and Frrieda Hammett of Waseca Learning Environments]

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 12, no. 1

Pages: 12-13

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Learning Environments That Enhance Students' Cognitive Functioning

Available from: Firenze University Press

Publication: Formare [Form@re], vol. 22, no. 1

Pages: 322-339

Academic achievement, Classroom environments, Learning environments, Prepared environment

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Abstract/Notes: A general rethinking of the school system is underway. Today, the purpose of school is to prepare students for rapid change and the complexity of reality so that they are not overwhelmed. Executive cognitive functions have been shown to be fundamental to this purpose, specifically thoughtful planning of an idea, reflexivity, systematic approach to a task/problem, and the ability to stay focused. These are the skills that tomorrow's leaders will need (Diamond and Lee, 2011). But what theoretical and instructional models exist that aim to develop the cognitive skills necessary to succeed in school and in life? How and to what extent are the pedagogical principles of these models reflected in the organization of the physical learning space? This paper aims to trace some of the methods that promote the development of executive cognitive skills and examine how they organize the learning space.   Ambienti di apprendimento che potenziano il funzionamento cognitivo degli studenti. È in atto un ripensamento generale del sistema scolastico. Oggi la finalità della scuola è di preparare gli studenti ai rapidi cambiamenti e alla complessità del reale in modo che non ne siano travolti. Fondamentali a questo scopo si sono rivelate le funzioni cognitive di tipo esecutivo, in particolare la pianificazione mentale di un’idea, la riflessività, la sistematicità nell’affrontare un compito/problema e la capacità di rimanere concentrati. Queste sono le competenze di cui avranno bisogno i leader di domani (Diamond & Lee, 2011). Ma quali sono i modelli teorici e didattici che si propongono di sviluppare le competenze cognitive necessarie per avere successo a scuola e nella vita? Come e in che misura i principi educativi di questi modelli si riflettono sull’organizzazione dello spazio fisico di apprendimento? Questo contributo si propone di ripercorrere alcuni tra i metodi che favoriscono lo sviluppo di competenze cognitive di tipo esecutivo e di indagare come organizzano lo spazio formativo.

Language: Italian

DOI: 10.36253/form-12606

ISSN: 1825-7321

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Differences in the Development of Creative Competencies in Children Schooled in Diverse Learning Environments

Available from: ScienceDirect

Publication: Learning and Individual Differences, vol. 18, no. 4

Pages: 381-389

Comparative education, Efficacy, Executive function, Self-determination

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Abstract/Notes: Studies on the development of creativity have highlighted the impact of learning environments. In particular, pedagogical approaches are hypothesized to differ concerning their emphasis on individual initiative, and action-based learning. A semi-longitudinal study was conducted during two consecutive years with 210 children in elementary schools with traditional and alternative pedagogical approaches. Our results highlight (1) an influence of pedagogy on children's creative performance; (2) a positive influence of alternative pedagogy on creative development from year 1 to year 2 mainly for Montessori school. Children's creative performance was influenced not only by the type of task but also by the type of school.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1016/j.lindif.2007.11.009

ISSN: 1041-6080

Conference Paper

Exploring the Social Logic of Preschool Environments Structured with Waldorf, Montessori, and Reggio Emilia: A Semantic and Syntactic Study on Preschool Environments

Available from: ResearchGate

Space Syntax Symposium (13th, 20-24 June 2022)

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Abstract/Notes: Kindergartens are socio-spatial organizations with their social and cultural as well as their spatial structures which prepare children to be responsible members of the society. In the ear ly years of the twentieth century, the issue of how to raise new generations was one of the primary research areas of many educational scientists, especially in Europe, and therefore different progressive pedagogical methods were generated. Among these views, the Waldorf pedagogical approach developed by Rudolf Steiner, Montessori pedagogical approach developed by Maria Montessori, and Reggio Emilia pedagogical approach developed by Loris Malaguzzi became prominent. Although these three pedagogical approaches have a common view that the child should be accepted as an individual with his/her rights, each of them involved different physical environment requirements in the context of their educational philosophies. The projects obtained in an architectural design studio course constitute the focus of this paper and it aims to decipher the semantic and syntactic characteristics based on twelve student projects. The semantic dimension of the study was revealed by coding the related themes through students' project reports while the syntactic dimension of the study demonstrated the prioritized social interaction area through isovist area and variance values. Considering the semantic results, it was revealed that the students not only comprehended the spatial requirements of a specific educational pedagogy but also grasped the transformative power of the methods, in terms of physical, social, and natural characteristics. Considering the syntactic results, the fact that the mean isovist area value was higher in Reggio Emilia schools showed that the piazza dominates the physical setting. The fact that the school cluster with the highest variance value emerged in Montessori draws attention to the changeability of isovist perimeter value within the interiors to orientate the individuals to the classroom units.

Language: English

Published: Bergen, Norway: Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, 2022

Pages: 25 p.

Conference Paper

The Design of Learning Experiences: A Connection to Physical Environments.

Available from: ERIC

Annual GASCD Conference (Athens, Georgia, April 26, 1996)

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Abstract/Notes: The school environment must create a rich, beautiful, dynamic, meaningful experience for students to learn; however, architects, school boards, and the state focus almost exclusively only on the building when making design decisions. This document lists specific aspects to developing a visionary campus: one that provides a three-dimensional educational experience. Characteristics of the visionary campus include smaller size campuses, multi-age groupings, decentralized buildings, information access that goes beyond written or digital form, and sustainable architecture that is ecologically sound. (GR) Georgia Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (GASCD)

Language: English

Conference Paper

The Application of Student Portfolios in Primary/Intermediate and Self-Contained/Multi-Age Team Classroom Environments: Implications for Instruction, Learning, and Assessment

Available from: ERIC

Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association

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Abstract/Notes: Portfolios have gained wide acceptance as a learning and assessment tool. Yet, little research has been reported on the practices of teachers who are actually using portfolios within their classrooms and how those practices are moderated by contextual variables. This research examined the instructional, learning, and assessment roles of student portfolios, and explored, from the perspective of the classroom teacher, variations in portfolio applications associated with teaching level (primary versus intermediate) and classroom environment (self-contained versus multiage/teaming). Teachers for kindergarten through grade 5 in 3 elementary schools (n=314) completed a survey questionnaire regarding the instructional and assessment uses to which portfolios are put within their classrooms. To further examine patterns of portfolio use, a subset of 44 teachers was interviewed to explore teacher perceptions about the impact of student portfolios on themselves and their students. Results suggest that these teachers make deliberate decisions regarding uses of their students' portfolios, decisions that appear heavily impacted by the maturity or skill level of the child, the purposes of the application, and the classroom environment within which the application occurs. They also depend on whether the portfolio product is in a formative state (working portfolio) or final state (performance portfolio). (Contains 7 tables and 14 references.) (Author/SLD)

Language: English

Published: Montreal, Canada, Apr 19-24, 1994

Article

The Built Environment's Effect on Learning: Applying Current Research

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 14, no. 1

Pages: 53–56

Architecture, Design, Learning environments

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

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