Quick Search
For faster results please use our Quick Search engine.

Advanced Search

Search across titles, abstracts, authors, and keywords.
Advanced Search Guide.

155 results

Article

Montessori's Philosophy of Everyday Living

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: The Constructive Triangle (1974-1989), vol. 10, no. 2

Pages: 4–8

See More

Language: English

ISSN: 0010-700X

Article

Philosophy of Education: A Teacher's Starting Point

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: The Constructive Triangle (1974-1989), vol. 14, no. 1

Pages: 17–19, 21–23

See More

Language: English

ISSN: 0010-700X

Article

Montessori in Practice: A Teacher's Interpretation of Dr. Montessori's Philosophy

Available from: Internet Archive

Publication: New Era in Home and School, vol. 51, no. 6

Pages: 170-172

See More

Language: English

ISSN: 0028-5048

Article

An Introduction to Montessori: Philosophy and Practice

Publication: Tomorrow's Child, vol. 9, no. 5

Pages: 5–15

See More

Abstract/Notes: Excerpt from Child of the World (Michael Olaf's Essential Montessori for ages 3-12), with introduction by Tim Seldin

Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

To the Editor [Philosophy of Ayn Rand]

Publication: Montessori Matters

Pages: 3–4

See More

Language: English

Article

Organizing the Social Studies: The Storypath Philosophy [ages 9-12]

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 9, no. 4

Pages: 21–23

See More

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Outdoor Education in Maria Montessori’s Philosophy: A Chance for Inclusion?

Available from: Pensa Multimedia

Publication: Formazione and Insegnamento. Rivista internazionale di Scienze dell'educazione e della formazione, vol. 18, no. 3

Pages: 223-229

Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc.

See More

Abstract/Notes: In this paper, we are going to present some of the revolutionary and brilliant proposals of Maria Montessori’s educational approach, which, through its innovative use of space and movement still offers solutions to problems in our day and age. Montessori’s ideas are explained in relation to environmental education in the context of child-nature interaction as well as the practices applied within the framework of these ideas; they are also essential to facilitate educational inclusion, as they promote a sensory based and a child centered learning approach.

Language: English

DOI: 10.7346/-fei-XVIII-03-20_18

ISSN: 2279-7505

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Possible Connections Between the Montessori Method and Philosophy for Children

Available from: Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro

Publication: Childhood and Philosophy, vol. 16, no. 36

Pages: 01-22

Comparative education, Montessori method of education, Philosophy for Children

See More

Abstract/Notes: This paper aims to focus on certain aspects of two education methods: one initiated in the first half of the twentieth century by Maria Montessori, and the other in the second half of that century by Matthew Lipman. The aim – neither comparative nor analytical – is to shed light on the connections and, more specifically, the elements of the Montessori Method that reflect on Lipman’s proposal. The question this paper aims to answer is: can P4C find fertile ground in schools applying the Montessori Method? The paper will focus, among other elements: on the importance to give space to thinking experience from childhood and on the recognition of the value of childhood. Both Lipman and Montessori have systematically observed children of different ages – the former in the first half, the latter in the second half of the twentieth century. Both characterized, gave value, and focused their scientific contributions on children’s ability to think and express their thoughts through languages (purposely in the plural form). As educational researchers and professionals know, children have the ability to think, but such ability has not always been (still isn’t) considered to exist. Even when it is evoked in words, educational choices and proposals seem – still today – to express mistrust towards children’s thought. The two mentioned authors have repeatedly highlighted the importance of an essential right: the right to think and to be given a space – even as children – to exercise thinking with others. In particular, both authors – though envisaging different educational paths – identified the same categories functional to exercising thinking. Their interconnection may guide the actions of teachers, educators, and learning process experts. In fact, P4C might play a role in educational contexts in which the class is already considered a community of inquiry, in which the teacher is assigned the same role as a facilitator

Language: English

DOI: 10.12957/childphilo.2020.46784

ISSN: 1984-5987

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Maria Montessori’s Philosophy of Experimental Psychology

Available from: The University of Chicago Press Journals

Publication: HOPOS: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science, vol. 5, no. 2

Pages: 240-268

Maria Montessori - Philosophy

See More

Abstract/Notes: Through philosophical analysis of Montessori’s critiques of psychology, I aim to show the enduring relevance of those critiques. Maria Montessori sees experimental psychology as fundamental to philosophy and pedagogy, but she objects to the experimental psychology of her day in four ways: as disconnected from practice, as myopic, as based excessively on methods from physical sciences, and—most fundamentally—as offering detailed examinations of human beings (particularly children) under abnormal conditions. In place of these prevailing norms, Montessori suggests a model of the teacher-scientist in a specially prepared environment, who can engage in sustained and impassioned observation of “normalized” children. Drawing from a variety of texts and recently published lectures, this article lays out Montessori’s philosophy of experimental psychology and briefly discusses its relevance today.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1086/682395

ISSN: 2152-5188

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Montessori Philosophy is a Good Foundation to Education of New Generation

Available from: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)

Publication: ILIRIA International Review, vol. 8, no. 2

Pages: 227-238

See More

Abstract/Notes: The purpose of the paper is to present the philosophy of reform of education in Albania during the post-communist transition. Reforming education is a priority, but has been neglected by governments over the last 25 years. Over the last five years, the new curriculum and the new textbook system are being implemented according to the European standards. The core of reform is "have human beings learnt" (E. Ultarur, 2012). The constructivist philosophy of learning is a sure foundation that guarantees the new quality of the educational process. The Montessori's philosophy guarantees high quality and safety for the future because: First, this philosophy serves as a theoretical basis and serves as a method. Montessori has discovered the stages of natural development of the thinking human beings from childhood to adolescence, basing on scientific evidence, from childhood to adolescence. Secondly, Montessori’s constructivism moved the knowledge from the product into the process. Montessori illuminates the way of building human values during educational teaching process at school and in the community by the falling down of the classic wall that separates school from the community (public). Our research is based on the study of curricular experiences and on data from consultations with students, parents and specialists. The search method is holistic. By the holistic education the children need not only to develop academically, but to develop the ability as well in order to survive in the real world. The real world in our era is in front of the virtual world. In this contexts, we must teach children to learn not what?, but how? (How does it work/learn?). The teacher must learn his/her students how they construct the values by their immediate relationships with their friends and family as well as social development, health, and intellectual development.

Language: English

ISSN: 2365-8592, 2192-7081

Advanced Search