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686 results

Report

Reading and Math Achievement for African American Lower Elementary Students in Public Montessori Programs

Available from: National Center for Montessori in the Public Sector (NCMPS)

Academic achievement, African American community, African Americans, Americas, Arithmetic - Achievement, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Lower elementary, Mathematics - Achievement, Montessori method of education, North America, Public Montessori

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Abstract/Notes: As Montessori programs in public schools expand, Montessori education is becoming available to a more diverse population of American students than ever before. Students of color have a significant presence in public Montessori schools; over a quarter of students in whole-school public Montessori programs are African American. As these programs grow, researchers have increasingly directed their attention to demonstrating that Montessori works in public schools; however, few studies have examined outcomes for African American students at the lower elementary level, when critical reading and math skills are being established. This study sought to answer the question, how effectively does Montessori instruction promote achievement for African American third grade students in reading and math, compared to similar traditional schools and other public school choice programs?

Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C., 2016

Article

Movement and the African Child: A Practice Going Astray

Available from: African Journals Online

Publication: African Journal of Educational Studies in Mathematics and Sciences, vol. 14

Pages: 41-50

Africa, ⚠️ Invalid DOI

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Abstract/Notes: Movement is life and the power for growth and development for healthy lifestyle. Poor motion or inactivity is the basis for poor development in children and morbidity and mortality in adulthood. As children grow, it is expected that certain developmental dimensions such as physical, socio-emotional and cognitive will develop. These dimensions form a very important aspect of the human life and need to be nurtured to develop appropriately. One of the means through which these dimensions could be nurtured is through body movement involving locomotive and non-locomotive motions. For proper development children need to be taken through conscious steps that will help their all-round development which primarily has been part of African communal settings for cultural integration and development. Era of technology has brought several challenges facing the active lifestyle of African Children thereby predisposing them to sedentary living and its disease risks. Some of these include mass movement from rural setting to urban settlements, use of technology and also social media, fear of the environment and security issues amongst others. There is the need to appraise the cultural effect of technology on active lifestyle of African children and reactivate a balance between technology and re-integration of cultural mediums of training and development in children’s education. To promote adequate physical movement among children, curriculum should integrate healthy cultural/physical activities in the school, and parent should encourage their children to do domestic activities and reduce the use of electronic gadgets such as electronic games, TV and labour saving devices.

Language: English

DOI: 10.4314/ajesms.v14i0

ISSN: 2508-1128

Article

Immersion and Identity: Experiences of an African American Preschool Child

Available from: International Journal of Multicultural Education

Publication: International Journal of Multicultural Education, vol. 12, no. 2

African American community, African Americans, Americas, Bilingualism, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This article explores the benefits and challenges of a Spanish language immersion preschool from the perspective of a non-Spanish speaking African American family.  Data explored include the decision to enroll, reactions from peers and family, home-school communication issues, language development, and family involvement.  In addition, recommendations for families considering this bilingual option are considered. The primary data used for this article come from 127 journal entries written by the mother of the child from the beginning of the preschool admissions process until the end of preschool.

Language: English

DOI: 10.18251/ijme.v12i2.306

ISSN: 1934-5267

Article

Africa – Not So Dark!

Publication: Montessori Notes, vol. 1, no. 2

Pages: 20

Africa, East Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, Uganda

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori school in Kissubi, Uganda

Language: English

Article

Report from Africa 1968-1976

Publication: Communications (Association Montessori Internationale, 195?-2008), vol. 1977, no. 3-4

Pages: 26-28

Africa, East Africa, Ethiopia, Kenya, Muriel I. Dwyer - Writings, Sub-Saharan Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 0519-0959

Article

Water Brings Hope to Children [Azawak or Azawagh, West Africa]

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 19, no. 3

Pages: 12–13

Africa, Mali, Niger, Sub-Saharan Africa, West Africa, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Let's Change the Conversation about Africa

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 32, no. 4

Pages: 34-37

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: [...]the first time I saw a wild animal in person was at a Ugandan zoo at the age of 12. The Baganda people (as well as the people of other African ethnic groups) attach great importance, pride, and respect to their king and kingdoms, as well as to regional leaders called chiefs. Invite individuals to your classroom to share cultural artifacts, languages, clothing, food, music, and anything else that will enrich children's understanding of the African continent and its people and expand their worldview Now, 8 years into my career as a Montessori teacher, I am lucky that I have the platform and the tools to help young children appreciate and celebrate cultural diversity. While it's true that the African continent is home to a number of major national parks, with some of the world's most fascinating animals, especially the "Big Five" (lion, leopard, rhinoceros, elephant, and Cape buffalo), reducing an entire continent to just animals is a dangerous distortion of perspective for curious young minds.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Report on the Societies in Different Countries

Publication: Communications (Association Montessori Internationale, 195?-2008), vol. 1979, no. 2/3

Africa, Muriel I. Dwyer - Writings, South Africa, Southern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Three Montessori schools in Johannesburg - Sandton clinic day care centre - openend May 1976. Dwyer, Wikramaratne and Bryan visited South Africa for three weeks and gave lectures in Johannesurg, Durban, and Pietermaritzburg. Refers to Montessori Society of South Africa.

Language: English

ISSN: 0519-0959

Article

The Origins and Development of Child-Centred Education: Implications for Classroom Management

Available from: Sabinet African Journals

Publication: Educare (South Africa), vol. 32, no. 1-2

Pages: 222-239

Africa, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - History, South Africa, Southern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Since 1994 far-reaching curriculum changes in the form of an Outcomes-based Education (OBE) approach to schooling have been put into practice in South Africa. One of the pillars of OBE is a child (learner)-centred approach, that has an impact on virtually every aspect of classroom management. The question that arises is: what is a child-centred approach and what are its implications for classroom management? This article traces the broad issues surrounding the origins of a child-centred approach and investigates the implications of the implementation of a child-centred approach for classroom management. It concludes that child-centred teaching is still more rhetoric than reality in South Africa, because of certain constraints faced by educators. Constraints educators have to deal with in their classrooms, such as class size and inadequate training label education as child-conscious rather than child-centred.

Language: English

ISSN: 0256-8829

Article

Montessori in South Carolina: Authentic or Not?

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 30, no. 4

Pages: 48-53

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: While our study focused only on South Carolina, it is safe to assume that at least some of these issues, and probably others, exist in other states as well. Because we are focusing on challenges and barriers, it may give the impression that the overall study findings were negative. Exacerbating this problem is that very few Montessori teachers in South Carolina express interest in moving into administrative positions, reducing the pool of potential administrators qualified to run a Montessori program. [...]few hired principals that come into Montessori schools have Montessori credentials or experience in Montessori classrooms or schools. Offer more professional development and training certificates. * Provide funds for Montessori administrators to enter a training program offering a Montessori Administrative credential. * Offer a user-friendly and low-cost online course on the basics of Montessori. 2. Provide more opportunities for networking/mentoring. * Form online groups for Montessori public school principals. * Assign experienced Montessori principals to mentor new Montessori principals. * Conduct periodic, regional meetings of Montessori administrators for networking and idea sharing. 2 THE EMPHASIS ON STATE STANDARDS VERSUS FOLLOWING THE MONTESSORI CURRICULUM While most South Carolina public Montessori teachers agreed that they were able to implement authentic Montessori while incorporating state standards, and over three-quarters of teachers reported using the Montessori curriculum/sequence training as their foremost teaching guide, nearly half of all teachers reported that their schools required them to use a pacing guide for following standards and benchmark testing.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

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