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538 results

Article

Building a Just Adolescent Community

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 20, no. 1

Pages: 36-42

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Lawrence Kohlberg, a psychologist, coined the term "Just Community" to describe a community built on trust and resolution, in which each member participates democratically in the development of the rules and regulations that govern their community life (Kohlberg, 1985). In a school, this means that students and teachers alike actively participate in moral discussions about issues involving relationships between students and staff; each member of the community is held accountable to the group (Kohlberg, 1985). As such, the Just Community represents a type of moral laboratory, an opportunity for students to discuss and resolve moral issues that arise, and equally if not more importantly, to "act" morally in accordance with the rules set forth by the group. Kohlberg saw the Just Community as based on the concepts of justice (fairness and equal rights), and benevolence (social responsibility and altruism), and as inspired by a sense of group solidarity. Thus, broadly speaking, the Just Community represents a type of benevolent participatory democracy. The importance of many of the principles underlying a Just Community, such as justice, equal rights, and benevolence, have been recognized for many years. Creating a Just Community among junior high students requires an understanding of the unique developmental characteristics and needs of the adolescent age. In this article, the authors highlight the physical, social, cognitive, and emotional characteristics of young adolescents and the needs these characteristics suggest. Although they discuss these characteristics and needs in four realms, these realms are clearly interconnected in adolescence, just as in earlier stages of development (National Research Council and Institute on Medicine [NRCIM], 2006). The physical changes brought on by puberty heighten social, emotional, and intellectual tensions-- the adolescent is making, at times, the awkward transition from child to adult.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Community Spotlights: Notes of Interest from the Montessori Community

Publication: AMI/USA Journal, vol. 9, no. 1

Pages: 20-24

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Language: English

Article

A Montessori Infant Community [Hope Infant-Toddler Community, Creve Coeur, Missouri]

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 5, no. 4

Pages: 15–19

⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

En el Barrio [East Dallas Community School and Lindsley Park Community School, Dallas, TX]

Publication: Tomorrow's Child, vol. 16, no. 1

Pages: 47–49

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

Building Community/Retaining Students: Ways to Build Community in Your School

Publication: Tomorrow's Child, vol. 8, no. 5

Pages: 31–34

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

A Community Building with Care [Darvell Community of Hutterian Brethren, Robertsbridge]

Publication: Montessori Education, vol. 6, no. 4

Pages: 14–15

⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 1354-1498

Article

Grace and Courtesy: The Basis of a Normalized Community Nurturing the Respectful Community Through Practical Life

Publication: Montessori Articles (Montessori Australia Foundation)

⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

Article

Montessori Public School Pre-K Programs and the School Readiness of Low-Income Black and Latino Children

Available from: APA PsycNet

Publication: Journal of Educational Psychology, vol. 106, no. 4

Pages: 1066-1079

African American community, African Americans, Americas, Latin American community, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, Public Montessori, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Within the United States, there are a variety of early education models and curricula aimed at promoting young children's pre-academic, social, and behavioral skills. This study, using data from the Miami School Readiness Project (Winsler et al., 2008, 2012), examined the school readiness gains of low-income Latino (n = 7,045) and Black (n = 6,700) children enrolled in 2 different types of Title-1 public school pre-K programs: those in programs using the Montessori curriculum and those in more conventional programs using the High/Scope curriculum with a literacy supplement. Parents and teachers reported on children's socio-emotional and behavioral skills with the Devereux Early Childhood Assessment (Lebuffe & Naglieri, 1999), whereas children's pre-academic skills (cognitive, motor, and language) were assessed directly with the Learning Accomplishment Profile-Diagnostic (Nehring, Nehring, Bruni, & Randolph, 1992) at the beginning and end of their 4-year-old pre-K year. All children, regardless of curriculum, demonstrated gains across pre-academic, socio-emotional, and behavioral skills throughout the pre-K year; however, all children did not benefit equally from Montessori programs. Latino children in Montessori programs began the year at most risk in pre-academic and behavioral skills, yet exhibited the greatest gains across these domains and ended the year scoring above national averages. Conversely, Black children exhibited healthy gains in Montessori, but they demonstrated slightly greater gains when attending more conventional pre-K programs. Findings have implications for tailoring early childhood education programs for Latino and Black children from low-income communities.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1037/a0036799

ISSN: 1939-2176, 0022-0663

Article

An Overview of the Bachman Lake Community School

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 39, no. 2

Pages: 113-120

Americas, Bachman Lake Community School, Early childhood education, Lumin Education - History, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, Parent participation, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Tom Loew says that East Dallas Community Schools have been creating beautiful and functional environments for decades, but developing Bachman Lake Community School was more than creating a school. They also had to establish a community center, scale up staff quickly, service a wide number of families, leverage Montessori training and related costs, and ensure a Montessori approach. Most families at Bachman Lake are below the poverty line, very young, few are native speakers, and some are without immigration status. A mental health component is critical, home visits are frequent, professional intervention happens in homes, parents engage in "reflective service" utilizing licensed counselors, and the school encourages father participation. [This talk was presented at the NAMTA conference titled "Montessori from Birth to Six: In Search of Community Values," Minneapolis, MN, November 7-10, 2013.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Synergy in the Montessori Community

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 31, no. 2

Pages: 9

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Nancy McCormick Rambusch, founder of the American Montessori Society, described the application and significance of synergy in The Authentic American Montessori School: A Guide for the Self-Study, Evaluation, and Accreditation of American Schools Committed to Montessori Education (AMS, 1992). [...]creating synergy within a Montessori community to reach the specific goals of our organization requires common effort through building a scaffolding of support: * providing time and opportunity for all members to share perspectives and thoughts * encouraging open-minded listening * appreciating and understanding all members' perspectives * identifying and clarifying the work ahead * developing consensus about steps needed to reach a goal and taking ownership of those steps * evaluating, assessing, and reflecting on the results of community effort * planning for the future Helen Keller once said, "Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much" (1980, p. 489). Appreciating the power of synergy can help a community comprehend the negative impact ofbeing unwilling to accept others.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

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