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276 results

Article

Montessorians in Hawaii [Montessori Community School, Honolulu]

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: The Constructive Triangle (1974-1989), vol. 16, no. 3

Pages: 22

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Language: English

ISSN: 0010-700X

Article

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Dialogue and Democracy, Community and Capacity: Lessons for Conflict Resolution Education from Montessori, Dewey, and Freire

Available from: Wiley Online Library

Publication: Conflict Resolution Quarterly, vol. 23, no. 2

Pages: 185-202

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Language: English

DOI: 10.1002/crq.132

ISSN: 1536-5581, 1541-1508

Article

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Project Friends: A Multi-age Learning Community

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: Early Childhood Education Journal, vol. 24, no. 4

Pages: 217-221

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Abstract/Notes: Project Friends is a learning community based on our confidence in the multi-age classroom as a valuable and viable vehicle for teaching young children. Our three multi-age classrooms of kinder-garten, first- and second-grade children were the served as the setting for Project Friends. In this article, we share our beginnings, significant features and outcomes of the learning community, and our reflections on a year ended in Project Friends. Our experiences and the experiences of the children in the multi-age classrooms continue to provide rich contexts for teaching and learning in the elementary school.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/BF02354835

ISSN: 1082-3301, 1573-1707

Article

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Community-Building in a Diverse Setting

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: Early Childhood Education Journal, vol. 36, no. 4

Pages: 291

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Abstract/Notes: Research demonstrates that community-building in schools is an integral aspect of student success. Based on a foundation of research findings related to the importance of implementing community-building into all aspects of a school, community-building activities, including five specific classroom strategies (parent visits class to tell about child, weekly newsletter with interactive activities, bi-monthly open-house hour where children explain school work to parents, Valentine letters filled with true compliments, and a cultural celebration unit focused on Africa), were implemented in an urban magnet school. This school was moving toward racial integration as well as implementation of a Montessori education program. As predicted from research information, incorporating community-building strategies geared at creating a welcoming climate, at improving faculty interaction, at fostering collaborative classrooms, and towards on-going and open teacher/parent communication and collaboration resulted in positive outcomes in what could have otherwise been a difficult, negative or unproductive situation.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/s10643-008-0290-z

ISSN: 1082-3301, 1573-1707

Article

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Partnerships, Action, and Collaboration, Together (PACT): A Community-Based Partnership Where Innovation, Collaboration, and Impact Reshape Stakeholders’ Vision

Available from: University of Alabama

Publication: Journal of Community Engagement and Scholarship, vol. 14, no. 1

Pages: 13 pages

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Abstract/Notes: Project PACT (Partnerships, Action, & Collaboration, Together) (a pseudonym) is a multi-stakeholder partnership that reflects multiple goals, commitments, and priorities for early childhood education. PACT was informed by the literature on community-based research (CBR) and a commitment by partners to strengthen P–3 education where stakeholder assets contributed to reciprocal learning experiences in early childhood education. PACT stakeholders transformed two early childhood education classrooms into Montessori classrooms within a district public school. As one in a series of investigations, this research specifically examined partner commitments to a unique collaboration, the emergence of roles and responsibilities over time, and manifestations of innovation within a traditional public school setting. Data illustrate how stakeholders established a collaboration that allowed for flexibility, perspective-taking, and the opportunity to work together to reconsider and strengthen P–3 education through a model typically reserved for children of affluence. Beyond the operational demands of a startup initiative, findings also reflect the power of a collective through flexibility and a stance that values the assets of a community. The impact of this work demonstrates the potential to successfully impact quality education in early childhood settings through equity and opportunity.

Language: English

DOI: 10.54656/PPYY7979

ISSN: 1944-1207

Article

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Moral Beginnings: The Just Community in Montessori Pre‐Schools

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Journal of Moral Education, vol. 11, no. 1

Pages: 41-46

Ethics, Grace and courtesy, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: Kohlberg's concept of a just community has been instituted, in varying degrees and at various levels, from the early elementary years upward. It is argued here that, although pre‐school children are developmentally unprepared for the in‐depth classroom discussions and reasoning called for by Kohlbergian theory, they are nevertheless capable of creating a just community in simplified, or embryonic, form. It is further argued that this pre‐school concept has been in existence since Maria Montessori established her first Children's House. A comparison of the Kohlberg and Montessori models is made showing their compatibility in both theory and practice. Further analysis shows that developmentally the two work well as a sequence for children's moral growth.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/0305724810110104

ISSN: 0305-7240

Article

Opportunities: The Potential of a Unified Montessori Community

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 15, no. 2

Pages: 1

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

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Maintaining an Empowered School Community: Introducing Digital Technologies by Building Digital Literacies at Beehive Montessori School

Available from: UCL Open Environment

Publication: London Review of Education, vol. 18, no. 3

Pages: 356-372

Australasia, Australia, Australia and New Zealand, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - Evaluation, Montessori schools, Oceania

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Abstract/Notes: In 2019, educators at Beehive Montessori School (Beehive) in Western Australia implemented their self-defined digital literacies framework. The framework guided their approach to, and use of, digital technologies in their classrooms. Doing so came out of a whole school action research project in which the school became a hub for inquiry and educators, and researchers worked together to identify issues and develop improvement processes. At the project conclusion, the educators and researchers had collaboratively defined a solution that met the mandated curriculum needs and fitted with the school autonomy. Most importantly the project and the solution empowered educators, as it aligned with the school-identified virtues and utilized the three-period lesson to teach it, all of which was consistent with Montessori pedagogy.

Language: English

DOI: 10.14324/LRE.18.3.03

ISSN: 1474-8460

Article

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From Holland to Hamburg: The Experimental and Community Schools of Hamburg Seen Through the Eyes of Dutch Observers (1919–1933)

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Paedagogica Historica: International Journal of the History of Education, vol. 50, no. 5

Pages: 615-630

Europe, Germany, Holland, Netherlands, New Education Fellowship, New Education Movement, Theosophical Society, Theosophy, Western Europe

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Abstract/Notes: In the period 1919–1933 the experimental and community schools in Hamburg tried to put into practice a new model of schooling without a set curriculum that was based on providing a considerable amount of freedom for pupils and teachers. These experiences were introduced in the Netherlands by way of magazines published by the New Education Fellowship (NEF) or Dutch journals edited by educationalists and university professors. The Hamburg schools were also visited by Christian Anarchist teachers who were connected with new schools in the Netherlands and who already had experimented with new ways of life in small communities. In this article we describe their experiences in Hamburg. Their observation reports would not trigger a growing interest in a social community type of schooling; in general Dutch teachers, even the socialist ones, did not change their preference for the traditional classroom system of education. More individualistic methods from Montessori and Parkhurst (Dalton Plan), supported by university professors and inspectors of education, were considered to have more potential for changing the classroom system from within.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/00309230.2014.927513

ISSN: 0030-9230, 1477-674X

Article

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Implementing Fitness and Nutrition Education in Urban, Underserved, Community-Based Montessori Schools: Challenges and Lessons Learned

Available from: Project MUSE

Publication: Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action, vol. 16, no. 3

Pages: 339-348

Americas, Lumin Education, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, Nutrition education, Physical education for children, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Background: Few studies have discussed school-based health programs in Montessori education. Lumin has a network of Montessori elementary schools serving mainly lower income families in Dallas, Texas. Since 2015, our medical school has partnered with Lumin to design and implement fitness and nutrition curricula adherent to Montessori principles., Objectives: To describe a novel Montessori school-based health program and determine avenues for improvement based on lessons learned., Methods: Led by medical students with guidance from faculty mentors, the program was developed collaboratively with Lumin leaders based on a critical need in their community and shaped with results from a cross-sectional health needs assessment among Lumin families. Data were collected to measure the impact of the program and a program evaluation was conducted after 5 years of operation to explore curriculum refinement., Results and Lessons Learned: The greatest challenges were recruitment of student volunteers, scheduling and coordination, and garnering community interest for secondary activities (e.g., health fairs)., Conclusions: Despite challenges, this partnership has resulted in a successful program that relies on faculty and student volunteers, incorporates community-based participatory research and service learning concepts, and follows Montessori principles.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1353/cpr.2022.0051

ISSN: 1557-055X

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