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Article

Does Preschool Curriculum Make a Difference in Primary School Performance: Insights into the Variety of Preschool Activities and Their Effects on School Achievement and Behaviour in the Caribbean Island of Trinidad; Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal evidence

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Early Child Development and Care, vol. 103, no. 1

Pages: 27-42

Americas, Caribbean, Latin America and the Caribbean, Trinidad and Tobago

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Abstract/Notes: Preschool education is an important and much studied topic in developed countries, and of growing importance in the third world. Studies exploring preschool experience have noted positive effects when comparing children with access to preschool versus children without access, and effects of particular curriculum approaches over the length of primary schooling. This study adopts a focused sample, cross‐sectional design to explore the types of preschool experience available (denoted by types of preschool activities which equate broadly to curriculum approaches) and whether variation in preschool experience affects core curriculum (English, science, mathematics) performance and classroom behaviours throughout the years of primary schooling in Trinidad and when children complete their primary education in the form of a national ‘common entrance examination’ for entry into a stratified secondary school system. Results show that a large majority of the sampled children attended preschool and that most of the preschool experience was traditional and teacher centred. Neither child centred or teacher centred preschool activities affected academic performance in the core subjects during the primary school years or at the end of their primary school career. Type of preschool activity did affect teacher perception of behaviour in class. Child centred experience facilitated a social/peer orientation in children. High levels of teacher centred experience detracted from later relationships with teacher. Results were confounded by social class, with middle class children having most access to (the limited amount available) child centred preschool experience and performing at the highest academic and behavioural levels in the classroom although in limited numbers. The discussion questions the appropriacy of the various preschool activities for pupils within a cultural orientation of traditional upbringing and primary schooling practices.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/0300443941030103

ISSN: 0300-4430, 1476-8275

Article

School Accreditation News

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 27, no. 4

Pages: 18

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Abstract/Notes: The AMS accreditation designation indicates that an AMS member school meets a well-defined standard of excellence.ACTON MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Initial Accreditation) Acton Darlene Paquette, Head of School THE BOYD SCHOOL (Reaccreditation) 7 campuses in Northern Virginia MaryAnn Boyd, Head of School ETON SCHOOL (Reaccreditation) Bellevue, WA Russell Smith, Head of School THE HOCKESSIN MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Reaccreditation) Hockessin, DE Janette Henry, Head of School MARIPOSA MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Initial Accreditation-Infant, Toddler, Early Childhood, and Lower Elementary levels) Austin, TX Whitney Falcon, Head of School MONTESSORI ACADEMY OF CHICAGO (Initial Accreditation) Chicago, IL Fosca White, Head of School MONTESSORI CHILDREN'S HOUSE OF AUBURN (Initial Accreditation) Auburn Kari Cafeo, Head of School NORTHGLADE MONTESSORI MAGNET SCHOOL (Reaccreditation) Kalamazoo, MI Dale Mogaji, Head of School SHREWSBURY MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Initial Accreditation) Shrewsbury Kari Cafeo, Head of School SUMMIT MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Initial Accreditation-Toddler, Early Childhood, and Lower Elementary levels) Framingham Martha Torrence, Head of School THE VILLAGE SCHOOL (Reaccreditation) Waldwick, NJ Marilyn Larkin, Head of School WEST SIDE MONTESSORI (Reaccreditation) Toledo, OH Lynn Fisher, Head of School WOODINVILLE MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Reaccreditation) Bothell, WA Mary Schneider, Head of School WYOMING VALLEY MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Reaccreditation) Kingston, PA Dennis Puhalla, Head of School

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Liberty is Best School Discipline, Says Mme. Montessori - Teach Child to Control Himself

Available from: California Digital Newspaper Collection

Publication: San Francisco Call and Post (San Francisco, California)

Pages: 11

Maria Montessori - Writings

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Abstract/Notes: Reprinted in 'The California Lectures of Maria Montessori, 1915' (Clio Press, 1997).

Language: English

Article

Racial Discipline Disproportionality in Montessori and Traditional Public Schools: A Comparative Study Using the Relative Rate Index

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 1, no. 1

Pages: 14-27

African American community, African Americans, Americas, Comparative education, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, Public Montessori, School discipline, Teacher-student relationships, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Research from the past 40 years indicates that African American students are subjected to exclusionary discipline, including suspension and expulsion, at rates two to three times higher than their White peers (Children’s Defense Fund, 1975; Skiba, Michael, Nardo, & Peterson, 2002). Although this phenomenon has been studied extensively in traditional public schools, rates of racially disproportionate discipline in public Montessori schools have not been examined. The purpose of this study is to examine racial discipline disproportionality in Montessori public elementary schools as compared to traditional elementary schools. The Relative Rate Index (RRI) is used as a measure of racially disproportionate use of out-of-school suspensions (Tobin & Vincent, 2011). Suspension data from the Office of Civil Rights Data Collection was used to generate RRIs for Montessori and traditional elementary schools in a large urban district in the Southeast. While statistically significant levels of racial discipline disproportionality are found in both the Montessori and traditional schools, the effect is substantially less pronounced in Montessori settings. These findings suggest that Montessori schools are not immune to racially disproportionate discipline and should work to incorporate more culturally responsive classroom management techniques. Conversely, the lower levels of racially disproportionate discipline in the Montessori schools suggests that further study of discipline in Montessori environments may provide lessons for traditional schools to promote equitable discipline.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v1i1.4941

ISSN: 2378-3923

Doctoral Dissertation

A Study of Pre-School Education in the Republic of Ireland with Particular Reference to Those Pre-Schools Which are Listed by the Irish Pre-School Playgroups Association in Cork City and County

Available from: British Librarty - EthOS

Comparative education, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Montessori method of education, Ireland, Montessori method of education, Northern Europe, Preschool education

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Abstract/Notes: This study was undertaken in order to investigate the activities which took place in Irish pre-schools other than those within the formal school system. The principle focus of the research concerned the degree to which the pre-school children were being 'cognitively stretched' by the curriculum in which they were engaged. The social, linguistic, physical and creative development of these children was also considered.An historical review of the theory of play and recent research in this area was undertaken.Twenty-three pre-schools were taken at random from the membership list in Cork city and county of the Irish Pre- School Playgroups Association. One pre-school which was not a member was added. Prior to embarking upon the study, a history of the I.P.P.A. was given.The ethnographic research strategy was found to be the most suitable method of assessing empirically the nature and frequency of play in the pre-school. This study, which took place between 1986 and 1990, was therefore eclectic in nature, employing a multi-faceted approach encompassing a target child observational schedule, interviews, a study of classrooms, a questionnaire and an interaction analysis system.Briefly, the results showed that the 157 children engaged in this study were being cognitively stretched for approximately one quarter of the time if they were in a playgroup and approximately one half of the time if they were in a Montessori setting. Social and linguistic behaviour was limited by the actions of the pre-school leaders and physically or creatively challenging behaviour was rarely observed. The fact that the children played alone for half of the total time spent in the pre-school was most striking.The most important finding to emerge from the study of language in the twenty-four pre-schools was the fact that the children rarely communicated verbally. Dialogue was almost non-existent and children's questions were very sparse. In order to place the above in a National context, a questionnaire was sent in 1990 to a random sample of one hundred I.P.P.A. members in the 26 counties of the Republic of Ireland. Unfortunately, only 39 responded. However, of note was that approximately 25% of playgroup leaders had degrees and four-fifths of them were mothers in their mid-thirties. They strongly disagreed with the teaching of the 3Rs and felt that much more government money should be devoted to playgroups and in-service training for their personnel.

Language: English

Published: Hull, England, 1993

Doctoral Dissertation

Executive Function, Social-Emotional Skills, and Academic Competence in Three Preschool Programmes: Pathways to School Readiness

Available from: British Librarty - EthOS

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Abstract/Notes: Research findings indicate that executive function (EF), social-emotional skills, and pre-academic competence significantly promote children's school readiness and later success. School readiness broadly refers to a combination of skills necessary to function successfully in school and lack thereof may increase the risk of children's school problems. Therefore, it is essential for school systems to provide appropriate and timely support to the development of these fundamental skills. The present study focused on three particular preschool programmes: Montessori, Reggio Emilia, and the traditional play-based (British Columbia Early Learning Framework: BCEFL) programmes in Western Canada. Although they are popular, there is little empirical research that examines and compares the benefits of these programmes to the development of school readiness skills. As such, the present study aimed to 1) determine the effectiveness of these three preschool programmes in Western Canada on the development of children's school readiness; and 2) examine other sources of influences in the child, family and school in relation to the development of school readiness skills. Overall, 119 preschool children (48 Montessori, 42 Reggio Emilia, 29 BCELF) participated in the study. Observation was conducted once in the autumn of 2015 for each classroom using the CLASS observation tool. Teachers and parents of participating children filled in a series of questionnaires regarding the quality of their relationship with their child and their perceptions of daily EF and social-emotional skills of their child. The researcher also assessed individual children's fluid intelligence, EF, and pre-academic competence. The results showed that 1) although Montessori education appeared to be the most effective in facilitating numeracy skills, no curriculum stood out as notably more effective than any of the others at improving other areas of school readiness skills; 2) well-run classrooms where teachers were effective in time, behavioural, and attention management were most effective in promoting children's numeracy skills; 3) EF, social-emotional skills, and pre-academic competence exhibited an overlapping developmental process over time; 4) relational quality in both home and school environments significantly affected the development of school readiness skills, especially social-emotional skills; and 5) adults' perceptions of children's EF and social-emotional skills had a significant consequence for how teachers and parents formed their relationships with their children.

Language: English

Published: Oxford, England, 2018

Bachelor's Thesis

Perbedaan tingkat kemandirian anak Prasekolah di sekolah Montessori dengan sekolah non Montessori [Differences in the level of independence of preschool children in Montessori schools and non-Montessori schools]

Available from: CORE

Asia, Australasia, Comparative education, Indonesia, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - Evaluation, Southeast Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Kemandirian adalah kemampuan seseorang untuk melakukan segala sesuatunya sendiri sesuai dengan tugas perkembangannya yang didasari oleh inisiatif, keinginan, kontrol diri dan kepercayaan pada kemampuannya sendiri. Anak perlu dilatih kemandiriannya sejak usia dini supaya tugas perkembangan dapat berkembang secara optimal. Sekolah memiliki peran penting untuk meningkatkan kemandirian anak. Menurut Santrock (2002:242), lingkungan bermain sangat penting dalam optimalisasi perkembangan anak. Salah satu sekolah dengan pendekatan seperti di atas adalah sekolah Montessori. Pendekatan Montessori menerapkan agar anak belajar mandiri dan tidak bertanya kepada guru atau menunggu jawaban (Hainstock 2008:38-40). Anak yang dididik dengan pendekatan Montessori diberi kesempatan untuk bekerja sendiri dengan material-material yang ada di lingkungannya, mengungkapkan keinginannya untuk memilih aktivitas, mengembangkan disiplin, dan anak perlu mengetahui apa yang baik dan buruk. Apabila hal-hal ini telah dipenuhi, maka kemandirian anak akan terbentuk (Modern Montessori International n.d.:40-41). Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui secara empiris ada tidaknya perbedaan tingkat kemandirian anak prasekolah di sekolah Montessori dengan sekolah non Montessori. Subjek penelitian (N=28) adalah anak prasekolah berusia 3-4 tahun yang bersekolah di sekolah Montessori “X” dan sekolah non Montessori “Y” Teknik pengambilan sampel menggunakan seluruh populasi playgroup 2. Pengambilan data menggunakan rating scale terhadap kemandirian anak di sekolah Montessori maupun di sekolah non Montessori. Data dianalisis dengan teknik Uji t (t-test). Nilai t = 0.364, dengan p = 0.720 (p > 0.05) yang berarti hipotesis penelitian ditolak. Hal ini berarti tidak ada perbedaan signifikan tingkat kemandirian anak prasekolah di sekolah Montessori “X” dengan sekolah non Montessori “Y”. [Independence is a person's ability to do things on their own in accordance with their developmental tasks based on initiative, desire, self-control and belief in their own abilities. Children need to be trained to be independent from an early age so that developmental tasks can develop optimally. Schools have an important role in increasing children's independence. According to Santrock (2002: 242), the play environment is very important in optimizing children's development. One of the schools with such an approach is the Montessori school. The Montessori approach applies so that children learn independently and do not ask the teacher or wait for answers (Hainstock 2008:38-40). Children who are educated with the Montessori approach are given the opportunity to work alone with materials in their environment, express their desire to choose activities, develop discipline, and children need to know what is good and bad. If these things have been fulfilled, then the child's independence will be formed (Modern Montessori International n.d.: 40-41). This study aims to determine empirically whether there are differences in the level of independence of preschool children in Montessori schools and non-Montessori schools. The research subjects (N=28) were preschoolers aged 3-4 years who attended Montessori schools "X" and non-Montessori schools "Y" The sampling technique used the entire playgroup population 2. Data collection used a rating scale on the independence of children in Montessori schools. as well as in non-Montessori schools. The data were analyzed by using the t-test technique (t-test). The value of t = 0.364, with p = 0.720 (p > 0.05) which means the research hypothesis is rejected. This means that there is no significant difference in the level of independence of preschool children in Montessori schools "X" with non-Montessori schools "Y"]

Language: Indonesian

Published: Surabaya, Indonesia, 2009

Article

Introducing the AMS Pathway of Continuous School Improvement

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 28, no. 4

Pages: 17

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: At the AMS 2016 Annual Conference (held last March, in Chicago), we shared the news that AMS is launching a new school-quality initiative, available to all member schools: the AMS Pathway of Continuous School Improvement.AMS offers free coaching by a personalized "school quality concierge," selfassessment resources, sample documents, and other materials to assist schools on the journey of continuous improvement. * Respectful.[...]unlike AMS school accreditation, which is a designation reserved for those AMS-member schools that have completed the rigorous process of validating their compliance with AMS accreditation standards, the pathway recognizes every participating school as being engaged in a standards-based process of improvement.The Pathway of Continuous School Improvement supports our member schools by providing a mechanism for articulating quality and direction for ongoing, self-paced, continuous improvement, with an ultimate goal of better serving our children.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

School Accreditation News

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 28, no. 2

Pages: 19

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Abstract/Notes: AMS accreditation is a designation that an AMS member school meets a well-defined standard of excellence.AMARE MONTESSORI (SATELLITE OF MONTESSORI ACADEMY) (Initial Accreditation) Clarksville, TN Jaime Yeager, Head of School BRIXHAM MONTESSORI FRIENDS SCHOOL (Initial Accreditation) York, ME Alica B. Johnson-Grafe, Head of School CHILDREN'S TREE MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Initial Accreditation) Old Saybrook, Connecticut Marci Martindale, Head of School COUNTRYSIDE MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Reaccreditation) Charlotte, NC Dolores Murgolo, Interim Head of School HILL COUNTRY MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Reaccreditation) Boerne, TX Steven Whewell, Head of School KENNEBEC MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Reaccreditation) Fairfield, ME Rebecca Green, Head of School MONTESSORI ACADEMY (Addition of an Accredited Infant Program) Brentwood, TN James R. Bernstorf, Head of School MONTESSORI ACADEMY OF ARLINGTON (Addition of an Accredited Infant Program) Arlington, TX Pamela Dunbar, Head of School MONTESSORI SCHOOL OF MCLEAN (Addition of an Accredited Toddler program) McLean, VA Meredith Wood & Thomas Le Grand, Heads of School MONTESSORI SCHOOL OF WAUKESHA (Initial Accreditation) Waukesha, WI William R. Walsh, Executive Director MONTESSORI SCHOOL OF WESTMINSTER (Initial Accreditation) Westminster, MD Jodi Lupco, Head of School SHINING STARS MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Initial Accreditation: Early Childhood and Lower Elementary levels) Washington, DC Regina Rodriguez, Executive Director

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Comparison of Preschool and First Grade Teachers' Views about School Readiness

Available from: ERIC

Publication: Educational Sciences: Theory and Practice, vol. 13, no. 3

Pages: 1708-1713

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: School readiness is an important concern for parents and teachers because it is a multifaceted process which encompasses all the developmental areas and various skills of children rather than only focusing on cognitive and literacy skills. In particular, preschool and first grade teachers experience the positive and negative sides of the process of school readiness. In this study, basic qualitative research was used to compare teachers' views about school readiness. The participants were 35 preschool and 35 first grade teachers and a semi-structured interview protocol developed by the researchers was used to collect data. Qualitative analysis was performed at the end of the study and according to the findings, the following five main themes were determined: definition of school readiness, the effective people and institutions in the school readiness process, preschool education for school readiness, the difficulties encountered in the school readiness process and suggestions for effective school readiness. Also, the findings showed that preschool and first grade teachers tended to have similar views related school readiness.

Language: English

ISSN: 1303-0485

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