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906 results

Article

Biomes of North America

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 18, no. 4

Pages: 8–11

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Language: English

Article

Montessori Conferences in North America and Asia [Mesa, Arizona; Santa Barbara, California; Hong Kong]

Publication: Montessori Observer, vol. 21, no. 3

Pages: 1, 3-4

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Language: English

ISSN: 0889-5643

Article

Report from Asilomar [11th Annual Meeting of the Teacher Trainers' Council of North America]

Publication: AMI/USA Bulletin, vol. 1, no. 6

Pages: 6

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Language: English

Article

First Annual West Coast IMC North American Conference [April, 2005]

Publication: Montessori Leadership

Pages: 4

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Language: English

Doctoral Dissertation

Barriers Contributing to the Minimal Participation of African American Parents in Their Children's Schools: A Qualitative Case Study of African American Parent Involvement in an Urban K–8 Elementary School in Minnesota

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

African American community, African Americans, Americas, North America, Early childhood education - Parent participation, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, Parent participation, Parent-teacher relationships, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This research is a case study of African American parent involvement at a urban Montessori school in Minnesota. African American parents at this school have had limited involvement in conferences, PTSO meetings, school activities, and on the Site-Based Leadership Team. An examination of the literature was made to investigate the influences on African American parents when they make decisions about their parental involvement. This research covered the historical background, theoretical background, implications, racial barriers, and strategies that increased African American parent involvement. An ethnography was designed to gather data from 9 mothers of African American students. These parents provided information about their backgrounds and their experiences with the school. Staff at the school (6) were interviewed as to their experiences with African American parent involvement. The results of the study offer findings on attitudes, perceptions, needs and ideas for improving African American parent involvement at any school.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2000

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Teaching to Be American: The Quest for Integrating the Italian-American Child

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: History of Education, vol. 44, no. 5

Pages: 651-666

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Abstract/Notes: In the early years of the twentieth century, the great structural, social and cultural changes in American society included a growing number of immigrants arriving from the poorest regions of Europe. For the first time, the issues of immigration, assimilation and social integration became the most important problems facing American society. In the optimistic climate of the so-called progressive era, social reformers thought that these problems could be solved by the science of pedagogy, as applied to the educational needs of foreign immigrants. This essay centres on the pedagogical efforts of Italian-American educator Angelo Patri, who attempted to integrate Italian-American children into the fabric of American society through education. It starts by assessing Patri’s early writings, such as A Schoolmaster of the Great City, and his private and professional papers. In doing so, his work is situated in the debate on progressive education alongside pedagogue Maria Montessori, demonstrating his central role in the debate on integration through education. Within this analysis, particular attention is paid to the notion of learning by doing, and it is argued that both educators were influenced by this particular aspect of progressive education.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/0046760X.2015.1063710

ISSN: 0046-760X, 1464-5130

Doctoral Dissertation

Evaluating the Effectiveness of Montessori Reading and Math Instruction for Third Grade African American Students in Urban Elementary Schools

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

African American children, African American community, Americas, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Improving academic achievement for students of color has long been the subject of debate among advocates of education reform (Anyon, 2013; Breitborde & Swiniarski, 2006; Payne, 2008). Some scholars have advocated for the Montessori method as an alternative educational approach to address some chronic problems in public education (Lillard, 2005; Murray, 2011, 2015; Torrance, 2012). Montessori programs are expanding in public schools (National Center for Montessori in the Public Sector, 2014c) at a time when the American public school population is more racially diverse than ever before (Maxwell, 2014). A review of the literature reflects a lack of consensus about the efficacy of Montessori elementary instruction for students of color in general, and lack of attention to outcomes for African American students specifically (Dawson, 1987; Dohrmann, Nishisda, Gartner, Lipsky, & Grimm, 2007; Lopata, Wallace, & Finn, 2005; Mallet & Schroeder, 2015). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of reading and math instruction for third grade African American students in public Montessori, traditional, and other school choice settings, using end-of-grade standardized test scores from a large, urban district in North Carolina. Stratified sampling was used to select demographically similar traditional and magnet schools for comparison. Group mean reading and math test scores were compared using factorial MANCOVA and MANOVA procedures. African American students at grade three were found to perform at significantly higher levels in both reading and math in public Montessori schools than in traditional schools. No statistically significant difference was found in math achievement between African American third grade students in public Montessori and other magnet programs, although the Montessori group did achieve at significantly higher levels in reading. This suggests that the Montessori method can be an effective pedagogy for African American students, particularly in reading. Based on these results, recommendations are provided for policy, practice, and future research.

Language: English

Published: Charlotte, North Carolina, 2016

Article

Regional Reports [United States, Caribbean, Central America, South America]

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 13, no. 1

Pages: 19

Americas, Caribbean, Central America, Latin America and the Caribbean, Latin American community, North America, Public Montessori, South America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: El Boletin, September 2000

Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

Maria Montessori a New York: Essa rimarra' in America 4 mesi e verra' direttamente in California [Maria Montessori in New York: She will stay in America for 4 months and will come directly to California]

Available from: California Digital Newspaper Collection

Publication: L'Italia (San Francisco, California)

Pages: 1

Americas, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, North America, Teacher training, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: "New York, Apr 19 - La Dottoressa Maria Montessori e giunta off a bordo del piroscafo "Duca degli Abruzzi". La illustre pedagogista rimarra in America quattro mesi. Ella e accompagnata dal cugino Mario Montessori. Quanto prima partira per la California, ove e state chiamata da quel Consiglio dell'Istruzione a tenere un corso di pedagogia e didattica per le maestre delle scuole elementari. La Dottoressa Montessori e stata l'iniziatrice di un nuovo metodo pedagogico, il quale si differenzia dai metodi comunemente seguiti nelle scuole, perché lascia un'assoluta liberta all'iniziativa individuale del fanciullo, cercando coltivare questa senza forzare o mutarne, o comprimerne il libero sviluppo il fanciullo apprende non per la imposizione dell'insegnante, ma perché vuole apprendere, perché l'insegnamento e parte del gioco, della sua libera e spontanea attività. Scuole che seguono il metodo Montessori vi sono in Italia e in altri paesi dell'Europe. Da poco tempo ne sono sorte in America ed hanno avuto ed hanno grandi risultati pratici.

Language: Italian

ISSN: 2637-5400

Article

News from the Regions: USA, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Peru

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 15, no. 4

Pages: 14-15

Americas, Caribbean, Central America, Latin America and the Caribbean, North America, Peru, Public Montessori, South America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: El Boletin, May 2003

Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

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