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Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Nudging Parents Towards Parent Education Emails

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: This research studied the effects three different styles of email content has on sustained parent interest. Emailing is a cost-effective way of offering parents a glimpse inside their child’s classroom; but if parents do not engage with the emails or correspond with the teacher, the effort may be ineffective.. Over six weeks, 81 primary (3 to 6 years-old) parents at a small suburban Montessori school received one of three weekly emails containing photos or text intended to teach parents about Montessori education. The data suggests parents value photos rather than text. Teachers may see sustained engagement by sending regular photo-heavy emails of a number of children working followed by a brief caption. Text-heavy emails meant to describe the Montessori principles or materials should be created in advance, and be easily replicable and customized.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2018

Doctoral Dissertation

Does Parental Involvement Matter? A Comparison of the Effects of Two Different Types of Parental Involvement on Urban Elementary Students' Academic Performance

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: This mixed method study seeks to utilize a comparative analysis to explore the impacts of two types of parental involvement in urban elementary school students’ academic performance. Epstein’s (1995) widely cited typology describes six different types of parental involvement, and this typology serves as a framework for this study. More specifically, this study compares learning at home and collaborating with community, as parent involvement types, to student academic performance. The study utilizes descriptive statistics and correlational analyses to compare parent-reported student performance via a survey instrument and semi-structured focus group interviews to collect narrative data. Parental involvement has been vigorously studied over the last two decades, however, not much data appears to address how collaborating with the community, as a form of involvement, influences student performance and other studies provide an ambiguous picture for learning at home as another parenting type. Furthermore, there is evidence that direct-action parent organizing, as a parental involvement form of collaborating with the community, may impact educational outcomes and this study examines these research areas. After analyzing the data, the researcher did not find evidence of a significant relationship between learning at home and parent-reported student academic performance. However, the study did reveal a significant association between parents who were collaborating with the community and the parent-reported academic performance of their children. This moderate correlation from an often overlooked parenting type, collaborating with the community, may harbor rich findings within the literature and point to the need for greater scrutiny herein. In fact, this provides a warrant for additional research to explore the “efficacy” of collaborating with community as a type of parental involvement that significantly influences positive student academic performance.

Language: English

Published: Baltimore, Maryland, 2018

Doctoral Dissertation

Communication Strategies of Public School and Montessori Parents and Teachers

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

Communications, Elementary education, Montessori method of education, Parent, Parents, Public Montessori

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Abstract/Notes: Two important aspects of teaching and caring for children were explored using a questionnaire: communication preferences for talking to children and assumptions about how children think about specific things in various situations. Forty parents and teachers from Montessori Schools and forty parents and teachers from Milwaukee Public Schools completed a questionnaire concerning four social situations and one factual situation. Parents and teachers ranked responses to each situation from 1 to 5 or wrote an alternative response if none of those given were appropriate. Parents and teachers also predicted what they would actually do in each situation and described their ideal response in each case. In the second part of the questionnaire parents and teachers gave their views on how children understood ideas relating to time, another's point of view, and play. The responses to the questionnaire by parents and teachers tended to reflect the basic philosophy of Montessori education, which is based upon a cognitive constructivist model in which rational authoritative and distancing strategies rank higher than diversion, normative authoritative, and direct authoritative strategies. Moreover, the beliefs and behaviors of Montessori parents and teachers tended to support this conclusion. A difference was found in the diversion strategy whereby both groups ranked diversion high in the first and second social situations and very low in the fourth and fifth social situations. These differences were likely due to the particular type of situation described. The majority of subjects, both teachers and parents, responded with more cognitive reasons than social reasons to the five situations. They also responded more frequently with active answers than passive answers. Finally, it was found that public school teachers and parents who were from upper middle class districts and professionally educated tended to use the same strategies as the Montessori teachers and parents. In fact, there were no significant differences between the ideal ranking of these five situations by these two groups.

Language: English

Published: Madison, Wisconsin, 1982

Thesis

A Study of Parents’ Views and Choices Towards the Montessori Method

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Abstract/Notes: Dr. Maria Montessori established the Montessori Method in the early 1900s. Her first book ‘The Montessori Method’ was translated into English in 1912 and has since become a globally recognised form of education (Isaacs, 2012). This paper concentrates on the parents’ views and choices towards the Montessori Method as this particular subject remains largely unstudied, especially within the UK. The author of this thesis is qualified in Montessori early years practice and therefore has a personal interest in gaining an insight into the parents’ point of view. The thesis identifies and analyses the key aspects of the philosophy and curriculum within the Montessori Method. This was achieved by studying Dr. Montessori’s original ideas and recent supportive or critical reviews. To gain the perspective of the parents, questionnaires were designed to elicit answers to the following questions: What are the parent’s views of the Montessori Method? Do parents understand the Montessori Philosophy?; Do parents choose a nursery because it is using the Montessori Method? The study was conducted within two private Montessori Nursery schools: N:B and N:A. The questionnaire had a Likert 5 scale design, consisting of 16 questions and 1 open question giving the option of additional comments. 40 questionnaires were distributed in each setting. The response rate was: N:B: 23 (57.49%): and N:A: 16 (40%), with a total sample size of 39. The Likert scale results were processed into graphs and the displayed numerically. Additionally 26 participants provided extra information in the optional section, the results of which were organised into a graph of the five recurrent themes together with illustrative quotes. The results showed that even though the majority of the parents chose their nursery because it was using the Montessori Method and agreed with the philosophy, only a minority actually demonstrated a level of understanding of the method. The conclusion was that parents thought they know what Montessori education was but actually their understanding was superficial. The implication of this finding is that parents express a willingness to support the Montessori Method and Practitioners need to provide more information for them. However, the study was restricted due to the quantitative design of the questionnaire and the lack of academic sources to support findings. Parents’ participation was willingly given, suggesting further study in this area to be feasible.

Language: English

Article

Parents as Partners: Creating a Culture of Respect and Collaboration with Parents

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 40, no. 1

Pages: 129-137

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Parents as partners is a slight digression in title from the grace and courtesy theme of the journal, but it builds its argument around the concept of cooperative relations between the parents and the school. Sarah speaks of the perception of the teacher and parents as each being unique and particular to the life and personality of each child. The teacher must see the positive in the child and have a natural respect and dignity so both want to act for the greater good and, likewise, must treat the parents as wanting to make their own contribution to their child as part of the whole-child community. Sarah goes on to suggest that diverse views of the same child are one of the most valuable offerings of a school. These varying perspectives override the linear view that assumes one perspective, which can be one-dimensional, reductionist, and can lead to labeling. [This talk was presented at the NAMTA conference titled "Grace, Courtesy, and Civility Across the Planes," Portland, OR, March 13-16, 2014.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effect of Seesaw Technology on Parent Engagement at Private Montessori Schools

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: The researchers looked at how using Seesaw technology, in a six-week parent education intervention, would affect parent engagement with their children in learning at home as well as parent understanding of Montessori principles. The research participants were 31 parents and 2 teachers at two private, urban Montessori schools. Data was collected through pre and postintervention questionnaires, teacher logs of parent questions, and Seesaw usage data. Through the intervention, we saw parent knowledge of Montessori principles, parent engagement, parent efficacy, and parent confidence in Montessori education beyond preschool increase. Parents also enjoyed interacting with each other as a community of parents, building a school community. The research supports Seesaw as an effective tool for parent education in today’s digital world. Technology is something that is familiar to today’s parent and can be utilized more specifically and intentionally by schools to connect parents to student learning activities, to their community, and to encourage their own growth as parents. This growth was demonstrated by a shift in parents’ focus from the external (child’s behavior) to the internal (adult’s role in preparing the environment) consistent with Montessori’s prepared adult

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2018

Article

Blending Differing Perspectives of Parents and Guides: Meeting Parents Where They Are and Bringing Them along on the Journey

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 39, no. 1

Pages: 91-97

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Abstract/Notes: Maura Joyce's clear approach to initiating parent education is to recognize where the parents are on their own journey as parents. By listening to the parents' hopes, fears, and desired outcomes for their children acknowledges the family's perspective and brings mutuality into a shared community. Maura Joyce encourages the use of questionnaires and feedback and gives specific exercises to implement parent education, open communication, and ease parents' anxieties. [This talk was presented at the NAMTA conference titled "The Montessori Oasis: Prepared Pathways for a Sustainable School Community," Columbia, MD, October 3-6, 2013.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Doctoral Dissertation

An Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Korean Montessori Teacher Training Program as Perceived by Montessori Teachers and Parents of Montessori-Educated Children

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: During the past ten years, a total of 3,642 teachers and administrators have attended the Korean Montessori Teacher Training Program (KMTTP). A sample of Montessori teachers (n = 261) and Korean parents (n = 375) from 32 Korean Montessori schools located in the major cities of Korea were surveyed in order to evaluate the effectiveness of this teacher preparation program. The EXPECTATIONS AND GOAL ATTAINMENT QUESTIONNAIRE (EGAQ), designed by the researcher, was the instrumentation used to conduct this study. Major findings demonstrated that 74.5 percent of the teachers surveyed indicated that their main reasons for attending the KMTTP were to increase their professional competency and their knowledge of child development through Montessori philosophy. The correlation between teachers' levels of satisfaction with their preparation and perceived effectiveness of the training program was higher (r =.29, p $<$.05) than between their levels of satisfaction with the program and their perceptions of their preparedness after completion of training (r =.18, p $<$.05). Significant differences existed between perceived effectiveness of the KMTTP and teachers' ages, positions, and years of experience. Older teachers and those with more advanced teaching positions expressed greater satisfaction with the program. Teachers indicated that, upon completion of the KMTTP, they felt more prepared in, than knowledgeable of, Montessori educational methodology. From the parent perspective, the most frequently cited reason (74.3%) for sending their child to a Montessori School was to provide a learning environment that nurtured their child's interpersonal growth. A majority of the parents (58.5%) were very satisfied with the Montessori experience; no parents were dissatisfied or very dissatisfied. In correlating the effectiveness of Montessori education with specific outcomes, parents indicated highest levels of satisfaction in the areas of "concentration" and "academic achievement." A majority of the teachers surveyed (52.8%) encouraged the implementation of the Montessori Teacher Training Program in neighboring countries, with 42.1 percent strongly encouraging implementation. This study demonstrated the need for further development and improvement in the area of Montessori teacher training in Korea.

Language: English

Published: San Francisco, California, 1994

Article

To What Extent Do Parents of Montessori-Educated Children “Do Montessori” at Home? Preliminary Findings and Future Directions

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 4, no. 1

Pages: 14-24

Americas, Montessori method of education, North America, Parents - Attitudes, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Few, if any, empirical studies have explicitly examined the home environments of Montessori-educated children, and specifically whether or not Montessori parents reinforce or undermine their children’s Montessori education at home. With a sample of 30 parents of Montessori-educated toddlers and preschoolers attending a private Montessori school in the Midwest, this cross-sectional study examined Montessori parents’ knowledge of Montessori methods and their parenting beliefs and behaviors at home. Results suggested that Montessori parents from the targeted school were knowledgeable about and valued Montessori methods, even though few had a Montessori education themselves. Parents in this sample varied in their parenting behaviors and choices at home, with some parents who intentionally reinforced Montessori principles and others whose behaviors were inconsistent with a Montessori approach. Findings from this preliminary study provide a first glimpse into the beliefs and behaviors of Montessori parents from which future studies can build upon. Montessori educators and administrators will benefit from future research involving Montessori parents, particularly for those who offer Montessori-based parent education sessions to the families they serve.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v4i1.6737

ISSN: 2378-3923

Book

The Power of Conscious Parenting: With a Bibliography for Montessori Parenting

Bibliographies, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: Includes 2 essays: "The Power of Conscious Parenting - Interconnecting Home and School" (by Marianne White Dunlap) and "Bibliography for Montessori Parenting" (by Jean K. Miller)

Language: English

Published: Rochester, New York: AMI/USA, 2011

Series: Parenting for a New World: A Collection of Essays

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