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579 results

Article

Parent Participation

Publication: AMI Elementary Alumni Association Newsletter, vol. 19, no. 3

Pages: 10

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Language: English

Article

Moment of Peril: Parent Participation [question]

Publication: Montessori Observer, vol. 25, no. 3

Pages: 4

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Language: English

Master's Thesis

The Effects of Using Virtual Parent Education Events on Montessori Toddler Parents' Participation, Understanding and Confidence

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this research was to study the effects of using an online platform to host parent education events, on parent participation, understanding of Montessori principles, as well as confidence in applying said principles with their children. I completed the research through a four-week parent education intervention. The participants were 11 parents at a private, urban Montessori school. I collected data through pre- and post-intervention questionnaires, attitude scales, parent feedback forms, and teacher’s observational records of parents’ questions and comments during and after the event. Through the intervention, parent knowledge and understanding of Montessori principles, parent engagement, and parent confidence in applying Montessori principles increased. Parents enjoyed the flexibility and convenience of the online format. The research confirms virtual platforms as effective tools for parent education in today’s technology-saturated world. Technology is a thing that is familiar to today’s parents and can be utilized more specifically and intentionally by schools, administrators, and educators to connect parents to student learning activities and to support their growth as parents.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2020

Article

Parent Participation in the Montessori School

Publication: PNMA Newsletter

Pages: 5-6

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Abstract/Notes: Newsletter of the Pacific Northwest Montessori Association (Kirkland, Washington).

Language: English

Doctoral Dissertation

Barriers Contributing to the Minimal Participation of African American Parents in Their Children's Schools: A Qualitative Case Study of African American Parent Involvement in an Urban K–8 Elementary School in Minnesota

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

African American community, African Americans, Americas, North America, Early childhood education - Parent participation, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, Parent participation, Parent-teacher relationships, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This research is a case study of African American parent involvement at a urban Montessori school in Minnesota. African American parents at this school have had limited involvement in conferences, PTSO meetings, school activities, and on the Site-Based Leadership Team. An examination of the literature was made to investigate the influences on African American parents when they make decisions about their parental involvement. This research covered the historical background, theoretical background, implications, racial barriers, and strategies that increased African American parent involvement. An ethnography was designed to gather data from 9 mothers of African American students. These parents provided information about their backgrounds and their experiences with the school. Staff at the school (6) were interviewed as to their experiences with African American parent involvement. The results of the study offer findings on attitudes, perceptions, needs and ideas for improving African American parent involvement at any school.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2000

Master's Thesis

Parent Education: The Effects of Educating Montessori Parents on the First Plane of Development in the Kindergarten Year in a Mixed-Age Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: This study sought the effects of educating parents on Dr. Maria Montessori's first plane of development in a mixed-age kindergarten classroom in Southern California, USA. Students withdrawing before completing the Montessori kindergarten year formed the basis for tailoring an action research project that informs parents about the importance of Montessori's first plane of development through the lens of Parent Development Theory. The researcher first explored past action research on relevant Montessori parent education studies. Next, twenty-five parents from a mixed-age Montessori kindergarten class participated in a six-week study. The research concluded that parents' understanding and valuing of the Montessori kindergarten year or final year in their students' early childhood education increased based on pre-and-post parent surveys and hands-on parent education experiences. The increase in parent knowledge resulted in the participants utilizing tailored information to make informed decisions about their student's kindergarten year on whether or not to keep their students enrolled for the full three-year period of the Montessori program. The researcher developed a more streamlined, focused, and comprehensive parent education plan than before the study began.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2019

Doctoral Dissertation

Parents and Early Childhood Programs: A Historical Analysis

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: Since early childhood programs were first introduced in the United States in the 1820s, early childhood professionals have been aware that teaching and caring for young children involves establishing relationships with their families. This study is a historical examination of the relationships between early childhood programs and parents. The study considered the political, social, and economic factors that have influenced the development of relationships between parents and early childhood programs, including: infant schools; kindergarten; laboratory schools; nursery schools; Montessori programs; day nurseries and child care; and Head Start. The study showed that the history of parent involvement in early childhood programs is essentially the history of early childhood programs. Since the 1820s, early childhood professionals have provided ample literary evidence of how parents were expected to be involved in early childhood programs, and how these expectations were communicated to them. Literary evidence was the basis for this study. Evidence used in the study included: autobiographies, journals, recollections, and letters of key participants; manuals of early childhood practice; proceedings from meetings and conferences; publications from government agencies; articles and commentaries from professional journals and popular magazines; theoretical and practical works by leaders in the field; research studies; textbooks; and childrearing advice books. The history of early childhood programs reveals a wide range of attempts to bring parents and early childhood programs together. At various times and in various contexts, these attempts have been called parent cooperation, parent education, parent participation, parent involvement, and teacher-parent partnership. Throughout most of the history of early childhood programs, parents were cast in the role of learner. More recently, the ideal relationship between parents and early childhood professionals has been characterized as that of a partnership. The various terms that have been used to describe the relationships between parents and early childhood programs were examined through the course of this study, as were the assumptions and beliefs that have influenced the interpretation of these terms.

Language: English

Published: Boston, Massachusetts, 1999

Book

Evaluation of the Indianapolis Public Schools' Montessori Option (K-6) Pupil Progress Report

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Abstract/Notes: Parents and guardians of children in the Indianapolis Public Schools' Montessori Option Program for kindergartners through sixth graders were surveyed. Parents and guardians were surveyed on: (1) the pupil progress report, which was used on a pilot basis during the 1988-89 school year; (2) the Montessori method; (3) strengths and weaknesses of the program; and (4) changes the program needed. Questionnaires were sent to the households of 536 pupils and to 50 school staff members in the 3 Montessori Option elementary schools. Parents and guardians replied positively to 25 closed-ended questions; were neutral about none; and responded negatively to four. School staff replied positively to 27; were neutral about none; and responded negatively to two. Parents and guardians expressed concern about more than 46 survey-related topics. Parent-initiated topics included: competitiveness and comparison between students, curriculum design and development, learning environments, parent-teacher conferences, program expansion, public school use of Montessori philosophy, and staff certification and training. School staff expressed concern about classroom mangagement, instructional materials, parent involvement, parent-teacher conferences, skills and knowledge analysis, student progress, and the district-wide testing program. Questions and responses (along a Likert-type scale) are provided for parents and school staff members. Parents and guardians of children in the Indianapolis Public Schools' Montessori Option Program for kindergartners through sixth graders were surveyed. Parents and guardians were surveyed on: (1) the pupil progress report, which was used on a pilot basis during the 1988-89 school year; (2) the Montessori method; (3) strengths and weaknesses of the program; and (4) changes the program needed. The survey instrument consisted of a section on respondent characteristics, 32 closed-ended questions, and three open-ended questions. The five sections of the survey covered the evaluation key, report card headings and philosophy, report card delivery to parents and guardians, and basic principles of the Montessori method. The survey elicited parent opinions about the program. The households of 536 pupils and 50 school staff members in the 3 Montessori Option elementary schools received questionnaires. This main report describes survey methodology, reports results and conclusions, and offers recommendations. Related materials are appended. Parents and guardians of children in the Indianapolis Public Schools' Montessori Option Program for kindergartners through sixth graders were surveyed. Parents and guardians were surveyed on: (1) the pupil progress report, which was used on a pilot basis during the 1988-89 school year; (2) the Montessori method; (3) strengths and weaknesses of the program; and (4) changes the program needed. The survey instrument consisted of a section on respondent characteristics, 32 closed-ended questions, and 3 open-ended questions. The five sections of the survey introduced the topics of the evaluation key, report card headings and philosophy, report card delivery to parents and guardians, and basic principles of the Montessori method. The survey elicited parent opinions about the program. The households of 536 pupils and 50 school staff members in the 3 Montessori Option elementary schools received questionnaires. This appendix to the main report provides: (1) survey design input from parents, teachers, and others; (2) the Montessori Option Pupil Progress Report Survey; and (3) parent and teacher responses for each item.

Language: English

Published: Indianapolis, Indiana: Indianapolis Public Schools, 1989

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Master's Thesis

Nudging Parents Towards Parent Education Emails

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: This research studied the effects three different styles of email content has on sustained parent interest. Emailing is a cost-effective way of offering parents a glimpse inside their child’s classroom; but if parents do not engage with the emails or correspond with the teacher, the effort may be ineffective.. Over six weeks, 81 primary (3 to 6 years-old) parents at a small suburban Montessori school received one of three weekly emails containing photos or text intended to teach parents about Montessori education. The data suggests parents value photos rather than text. Teachers may see sustained engagement by sending regular photo-heavy emails of a number of children working followed by a brief caption. Text-heavy emails meant to describe the Montessori principles or materials should be created in advance, and be easily replicable and customized.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2018

Article

Assessing Parenting Education: Parenting Styles of Adolescents in Rural and Urban Society

Available from: Indonesian Journal of Educational Studies - Research Institute of Universitas Negeri Makassar

Publication: Indonesian Journal of Educational Studies, vol. 23, no. 1

Pages: 72-80

Asia, Australasia, Indonesia, Southeast Asia

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Abstract/Notes: The objective of this study is to find out the differences of parenting styles in rural and urban society toward with adolescent’s involvement in family decision making. This research using a cross sectional survey method and embracing the theories of Montessori, Steinberg and Santrock about adolescent development, and Yusuf in parenting styles. The instrument used was adapted from the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire. It was consisted of 13 questions they were independency, responsibility, honesty, self-acceptance, receiving mistakes, trust, protection, freedom, involvement, and discipline. The result of rural society was the highest maximum value on the acceptance question (59%), namely admitting mistakes. For urban society data showed that the highest score of the questionnaire is about the parenting style of acceptance with a value of 62%. This meant that the result of the parenting style the child receives was the permissiveness style of care. The conclusion based on the area the urban society is more democratic in parenting. It makes teenagers more independent, confident and open minded

Language: English

DOI: 10.26858/ijes.v23i1.13797

ISSN: 2621-6744, 2621-6736

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