Quick Search
For faster results please use our Quick Search engine.

Advanced Search

Search across titles, abstracts, authors, and keywords.
Advanced Search Guide.

582 results

Doctoral Dissertation

An Historical Analysis of the Role of Magnet Schools in the Desegregation of Riverview School District

Available from: University of Illinois - IDEALS

See More

Abstract/Notes: This historical study provides a concise history of desegregation in public schools in the United States and the subsequent establishment of magnet schools. An historical timeline from the establishment of the first magnet schools to current magnet schools models of excellence was presented. Equity theory framed this study as educational practitioners continue to strive for equal access to educational programs for all students. This study examined historical, racial, and socio-economic data from a school district in central Illinois that established magnet programs in 1979 to stop White flight. The results of the study included information regarding the historical and political events that led to the establishment of magnet programs. Additional data examined if the magnet programs led to improved integration in the school district and if there were differences between students enrolled in both the magnet classes and the non-magnet classes in terms of race and socio-economic status. The study found that there were many factors which led to the establishment of the magnet programs in Riverview. Additionally, the study found that the magnet programs did not accomplish their initial task, and that there are some significant racial and socio-economic differences between students enrolled in magnet and non-magnet classes. Recommendations for further study were provided.

Language: English

Published: Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, 2015

Article

Culture, Race, Diversity: How Montessori Spells Success in Public Schools

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 18, no. 4

Pages: 9

⛔ No DOI found

See More

Abstract/Notes: Addressing the many complex issues associated with culture, race, and diversity is tough under any circumstances. But such issues become even more complex in school settings where large numbers of students speak different languages and reflect diverse ethnicities and socioeconomic statuses. In this article, the author describes how the faculty members and the administrators at Fort Wayne Community Schools (FWCS) in Indiana found a balance between quality education and student diversity. FWCS offers a district-wide school choice program that features a number of different educational offerings. Interestingly, as the district's student population (nearly 32,000) has become increasingly diverse--it now has about 80 languages/dialects represented by students--its Montessori magnet program has grown more successful. The author also relates that FWCS' Montessori magnet program is superbly suited to prepare students to flourish in culturally and racially diverse environments. As such, it is highly in demand among parents.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Book

Sisters and Sisterhood: The Kenney Family, Class, and Suffrage, 1890-1965

See More

Abstract/Notes: The Kenney family grew up in Saddleworth, outside Oldham, in the last decades of the nineteenth century. In 1905, three of the sisters met Christabel Pankhurst, a turning point which changed the rest of their lives. Annie Kenney became one of the leaders of the Women's Social and Political Union (WSPU), Jessie was an organiser at the heart of the organisation, and Nell campaigned outside the capital. Caroline and Jane used their connections within the suffrage movement as the springboard for careers in innovative education on both sides of the Atlantic. While working-class women are increasingly acknowledged in histories of the WSPU, this study is the first to make them the primary focus, and, in doing so, it opens up a new conversation around sex, class, and politics, and how these categories interacted in this period. This is a study of the possibilities for, and experiences of, working-class women in the militant suffrage movement. It identifies why these women became politically active, their experiences as activists, and the benefits they gained from their political work. It stresses the need to see working-class women as significant actors and autonomous agents in the suffrage campaign. It shows why and how some women became politicised, why they prioritised the vote above all else, and how this campaign came to dominate their lives. It also places the suffrage campaign within the broader trajectory of their lives to stress how far the personal and political were intertwined for these women. Although this is a book about 'working-class suffragettes', Lyndsey Jenkins also reveals what it says about women as workers and teachers, religious believers and political thinkers, and friends and colleagues, as well as suffragettes. Above all, it is a study of sisterhood.

Language: English

Published: Oxford, England: Oxford University Press, 2021

ISBN: 978-0-19-266513-3

Blog Post

Montessori and Public Schools

National Center for Montessori in the Public Sector (NCMPS), Public Montessori

See More

Abstract/Notes: Sara Suchman is the founder and executive director of the National Center for Montessori in the Public Sector. As attention shifts to how to meet each and every learner with what they need and how to help students build the social-emotional skills they need to thrive, Montessori schools have been doing just this for decades. Often seen as a private school offering catering to the elite, Montessori education has in fact thrived in limited public settings and in serving low-income students. Sara will speak to what is the reach of Montessori schools in the public sphere, what are the broader barriers to spreading the impact, and what her vision is for a more widespread and accessible Montessori education and how her organization is helping this vision solidify.

Language: English

Published: May 20, 2022

Article

The History of Base-Ten-Blocks: Why and Who Made Base-Ten-Blocks?

Available from: Mediterranean Center of Social and Educational Research (MCSER)

Publication: Mediterranean Journal of Social Sciences, vol. 5, no. 9

Pages: 356-365

Mathematics education, Montessori materials

See More

Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study is to present evidence of how base-ten-blocks have been developed and emphasized as a tool for learning in mathematics education. After an introduction of the theme, we discuss the theoretical and epistemological perspectives that provide the basis for our analysis of the literature. Then, we illustrate how base-ten-blocks have historically been associated with the numeral concepts from the prehistoric era to today. We also review studies about different manipulatives that focus on numerical concepts (e.g., Cuisenaire rods). This discussion will broaden our understanding regarding how perspectives toward mathematics instruction have changed with the introduction of base-ten-blocks. The intent was not to understand the process of developing base-ten-blocks but rather to suggest that teachers must consider the underlying mathematical concepts and structures of base-ten-blocks when they use them. In summary, this study revealed that base-ten-blocks as concrete materials seems to have been presented as different isomorphic numeral concepts for various educational purposes throughout its developmental process. DOI: 10.5901/mjss.2014.v5n9p356

Language: English

DOI: 10.5901/mjss.2014.v5n9p356

ISSN: 2039-2117

Article

How using smart buildings technology can improve indoor environmental quality in educational buildings

Available from: SHS Web of Conferences

Publication: SHS Web of Conferences, vol. 102

Pages: 03003

See More

Abstract/Notes: An educational building must integrate smart building strategies to ensure indoor environmental quality. Thermal, acoustic, visual comfort and indoor air quality are to be considered, otherwise they can develop the sick building syndrome. Smart buildings solve this potential problem by providing a highly efficient living ambience that includes safety, comfort and a good quality of living/learning/working experience, that helps the users achieve their best possible performance. These buildings should integrate advanced technologies such as automated systems and the implementation of architectural skins, well and functional designed spaces and architectural features that act as active bioclimatic solutions. The following is a case study of an architectural project for an elementary and junior high school academic campus in the state of Nuevo León, Mexico that has to deal with the extreme climate conditions of the location, while applying the best alternative and bioclimatic strategies through the implementation of inmotics, a responsive architectural skin, sustainable construction systems and native vegetation. In doing so, a comprehensive environmentally friendly building is created, taking advantage of the surrounding natural conditions, using the latest environmentally oriented systems and technologies. The result is a healthy, safe, and productive space for its users that greatly benefits the teaching-learning process.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1051/shsconf/202110203003

ISSN: 2261-2424

Article

Educating for Ecological Sustainability: Montessori Education Leads the Way

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 21, no. 4

Pages: 18-25

Sustainability, ⛔ No DOI found

See More

Abstract/Notes: These days, the word "green," and the more comprehensive term "sustainability," surface in numerous arenas, whether it be exhortations to recycle more, employ compact fluorescent lightbulbs, use less hot water, avoid products with excess packaging, adjust thermostats, plant trees, turn off electronic devices when not in use, or buy organic and local food. This article discusses what Montessorians are doing at an even deeper and more fundamental level to cultivate sustainability. Montessori students not only read and write and compute, they have a broad knowledge base upon which to become lifelong learners who respect self, others, and the environment. Ecological sustainability principles and authentic Montessori practices present new paradigms for living in this world, stimulating critical and creative thinking through content and process. Ecological sustainability and Montessori principles follow approaches that are holistic and systems oriented, attuned to living in harmony with the earth. They share a vision that recognizes humans as living beings and part of nature, comprising one web on one planet in a vast universe of profound mystery. Ultimately, both present a way of living--and establish a necessary, new way of thinking.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Fort Play: Children Recreate Recess

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 19, no. 3

Pages: 20-30

⛔ No DOI found

See More

Abstract/Notes: Recess beckons well before it actually arrives. Its allure can be heard in children's lunchtime conversations as they discuss imaginary roles, plans, alliances and teams, with an obvious appetite for play and its unbounded possibility. For some children, recess provides the most important reasons to come to school. In team sports, games of chase and tag, clique-bound conversations, solitary wandering and exploration, pretend and war play, recess offers reliable access to a scarce resource of immense value in the lives of children: spontaneous self-direction. Although watched over by the protective though generally unobtrusive gaze of supervising teachers, children at recess interact with their natural environment and with each other as they choose--a freedom denied them at other times while at school, and increasingly in their homes and neighborhood. As a lower elementary teacher at Lexington Montessori School (LMS) in Lexington, MA, from 1994 through 2002, the author witnessed for eight years the development of an extraordinary child-centered and spontaneous world of recess play (Powell, 2007). As children entered the elementary program at LMS, their peers initiated them into a culture of fort building. The forts, built entirely from sticks, leaves, and found objects from the surrounding woods, were the sites of considerable experimentation with different forms and rules of social organization and various styles of construction. They were also the vehicles for much of the conflict that occurred at the school. Children negotiated and clashed over ownership of land and resources and argued about the rules and roles of fort play and whether the rights of those already identified with a structure outweighed the rights of outsiders to be included. In doing so, they developed and influenced each other's reasoning about such moral principles as benevolence, justice, and reciprocity. Fort play was unpredictable, immediate, exciting, and fun, a brief window of opportunity,among hours of mostly adult-inspired activities and expectations, in which these children were free to manage their own lives and interact with each other on their own terms. As in the case of other schools where fort play has flourished, the LMS forts were in no way a programmed activity but rather a spontaneous one that simply wasn't stopped.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

The Need for Precision

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 24, no. 2

Pages: 28-29

⛔ No DOI found

See More

Abstract/Notes: People have become accustomed to the imprecision of language, though imprecise language has a subtle way of misguiding thoughts and actions. In this article, the author argues that the term "teacher" in reference to the Montessori practitioner is a distortion of everything Maria Montessori tried to undo about traditional education. In dealing with words and language precisely, one can arrive at all the rich connotations of the word "Montessorian." By so doing, the mind then possesses, with clarity and purpose, a greater understanding of one's role in the profession and in the classroom. Thus, by virtue of this clarity, Montessori teachers understand that their work is "not" a method, but a methodology; Montessori teachers remind themselves that their work is "science-based"; that as they respond to children's needs and their development, Montessori teachers can take pride as "professionals"; and that in their precise words of explanation to parents and the public, Montessori teachers do credit and service to the Montessori movement. Thus, the author contends that with precise language, with constant striving to refine methodologies, and with adherence to the highest standards of ethics, more and more children of the world will become beneficiaries of the rich meaning and vision that the words "Montessori" and "Montessorian" represent.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Yoga For Montessorians

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 26, no. 3

Pages: 50-54

⛔ No DOI found

See More

Abstract/Notes: When the author tells someone who does not do yoga that she is a yoga teacher, she often hears that they could not possibly do yoga. The most common reasons they give for this are: "I am really not flexible! I really don't like stretching!" and "Oh, but I wouldn't be any good at yoga!" Smith explains that, contrary to popular belief, yoga is not actually about being flexible; yoga is about learning to be one's healthiest, calmest, wisest, most free, strongest, and best possible self. Yoga, a Sanskrit word often translated as "union," aims to unify all aspects of one's being, and, by doing so, to help each of us know our true self. The work done in the Montessori classroom is very physical, there is constant motion, and because of this, many Montessori teachers suffer from knee, ankle, and lower-back problems. And yet, even a very basic physical yoga practice can help them learn to sit, stand, and kneel in a way that decreases the likelihood of long-term injury and pain. If someone would like to give yoga a try, this article presents a short practice intended for beginners. Practice can begin using the pictures provided herein, however, nothing can replace taking class with a live instructor.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Advanced Search