Quick Search
For faster results please use our Quick Search engine.

Advanced Search

Search across titles, abstracts, authors, and keywords.
Advanced Search Guide.

539 results

Article

News from the Regions [Bolivia, Chile, Paraguay, Peru, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Puerto Rico]

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: El Boletin [Comité Hispano Montessori]

Pages: 1-6

Americas, Central America, Comité Hispano Montessori - History, Comité Hispano Montessori - Periodicals, Latin America and the Caribbean, Latin American community, Latino community, North America, South America, ⛔ No DOI found

See More

Language: English

Article

World Montessorians Meet in Rome [1996 International Montessori Congress]

Publication: El Boletin [Comité Hispano Montessori]

Pages: 5

Comité Hispano Montessori - Periodicals, Conferences, Europe, International Montessori Congress, Italy, Latin American community, Latino community, Southern Europe, ⛔ No DOI found

See More

Language: English

Article

News from the Regions [Mexico, United States, South America, Central America]

Publication: El Boletin [Consejo Interamericano Montessori]

Pages: 1-4

Americas, Central America, Consejo Interamericano Montessori - History, Consejo Interamericano Montessori - Periodicals, Latin America and the Caribbean, Latin American community, Latino community, Mexico, North America, South America, United States of America, ⛔ No DOI found

See More

Language: English

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Nicaraguan Feminist Josefa Toledo De Aguerri (1866-1962): Her Life and Her Legacy

Available from: Universidad de Costa Rica - Portal de Revistas Académicas

Publication: Diálogos, vol. 5, no. 1-2

Pages: 555-576

Americas, Central America, Josefa Toledo de Aguerrí - Biographic sources, Latin America and the Caribbean, Latin American community, Latino community, Montessori method of education - History, Nicaragua

See More

Abstract/Notes: Este ensayo analiza el legado de Josefa Toledo de Aguerri (1866-1962), educadora y feminista nicaragüense. El análisis se enfoca en sus escritos sobre el feminismo, la eugenesia, y la sexualidad.

Language: Spanish

DOI: 10.15517/dre.v5i1-2.6248

ISSN: 1409-469X

Honors Thesis

The Seneca Language and Bilingual Road Signs: A Study in the Sociology of an Indigenous Language

Available from: Ohio State University - Knowledge Bank

Americas, Bilingualism, Indigenous communities, North America, North America, United States of America

See More

Abstract/Notes: One of the fundamental types of human rights concerns collective-developmental rights which allow minorities to use heritage languages and practices without external interference (Vašák 1977). The protected status of minority language rights is a critical part of language revitalization in which speakers of heritage languages, faced with the encroachment of more socially, politically, and economically dominant languages, embark on vigorous programs to ensure the survival and continued usage of their language. The Five Nations Iroquoian language, Seneca, has just a few remaining speech communities and a variety of ongoing language revitalization initiatives (Mithun 2012). To revitalize their traditional language, community classes through the Seneca Language Department and the Faithkeepers Montessori School Seneca Language Nest for young speakers have concentrated their efforts on preserving Onöndowa'ga:' Gawë:nö' the indigenous name for the Seneca language (Bowen 2020, Murray 2015). In the public sphere, a push by the Seneca Nation of Indians Department of Transportation fulfilling the intent of the federal Native American Tourism and Improving Visitor Experience (NATIVE) Act enacted in 2016, specifically included bilingual signs for state roads running through indigenous land in addition to other significant components (Figura 2016). In an area whose geographic names are strongly connected to Iroquoian languages including Seneca, these bilingual signs represent more public and visible Seneca language presence and stand as symbols of language revitalization. The place names and information that appear on the signs have considerable significance for community identity as well as linguistic and economic impacts, among others. Through oral histories collected from Seneca Nation members and language advocates in addition to a representative from the New York State Department of Transportation, this study pursues an analysis of the Seneca public usage of their heritage language and the various language revitalization efforts occurring among indigenous and minority communities internationally. As the COVID-19 pandemic threatens already vulnerable populations, heritage languages that have been historically oppressed face a global language crisis that disproportionately harms and disadvantages speakers of heritage and minority languages (Roche 2020). While the language of road signs may seem mundane, this study reveals how the Seneca bilingual signs play a significant role in awareness of indigenous territory and consequently stimulation of the local economy as well as supporting language learning, revitalization, and de-stigmatization. Primarily through the efforts of the Seneca community, the bilingual signs represent the expression of language rights in the public sphere and one part of the ongoing language revitalization.

Language: English

Published: Columbus, Ohio, 2021

Article

Montessori Early Childhood Education in the Public Sector: Opportunities and Challenges

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 39, no. 2

Pages: 61-90

Americas, Cornerstone Montessori School, Crossway Community Montessori School, Family Star Montessori School (Denver), North America, Public Montessori, United States of America, ⛔ No DOI found

See More

Abstract/Notes: Janet Begin's paper is based on the recognition and recent discussion of early childhood education in America. Her research touches on the challenges of implementing Montessori birth-to-six programs at Cornerstone Montessori School, Crossway Community Montessori School, East Dallas Community Schools, and Family Star Montessori School. She examines program start-up, funding, regulations and oversight, staffing, and training in a complete summary that points to the next steps in Montessori advocacy. Based on the facts of each program, she covers common aims and perils and, most important, demonstrates the viability and success of the comprehensive family approaches at these schools.

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Social Justice Education in an Urban Charter Montessori School

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 2, no. 2

Pages: 1-14

African American community, African Americans, Americas, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, Public Montessori, Social justice education, United States of America

See More

Abstract/Notes: As the Montessori Method continues its expansion in public education, a social justice lens is needed to analyze its contributions and limitations, given the increase in racial and socioeconomic diversity in the United States. Furthermore, much of the work in Social Justice Education (SJE) focuses on classroom techniques and curriculum, overlooking the essential work of school administrators and parents, whose work significantly influences the school community. The current study applied an SJE framework to the efforts of one urban, socioeconomically and racially integrated Montessori charter school. We examined the extent to which SJE principles were incorporated across the school community, using an inductive, qualitative, case-study approach that included meetings, surveys, focus groups, and interviews. Administrators quickly adopted a system-wide approach, but parents—often color-blind or minimizing of the relevance of race—consistently resisted. Study results imply a continued need for an institutional approach, not solely a classroom or curricular focus, when integrating social justice into Montessori schools.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v2i2.5066

ISSN: 2378-3923

Article

Building the Inclusive Montessori School

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 39, no. 3

Pages: 5-36

Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, People with disabilities

See More

Abstract/Notes: Pam Shanks describes Raintree Montessori School, an exemplary inclusion school, and gives credit to the legacy of Dr. Montessori. An inclusive Montessori community begins with "physical integration of all children, progresses to functional inclusion, and finally culminates in the highest level, social inclusion." Each of these levels is described with examples, photos, and stories, while the details about the physical environment, the staffing, and the strengths of the classroom community are helpful and heartwarming. [This talk was presented at the NAMTA conference titled "Building the Inclusive Montessori Community," Phoenix, AZ, January 16-19, 2014.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Book

The Nongraded Primary: Making Schools Fit Children

Available from: ERIC

See More

Abstract/Notes: This guidebook explains the concept of nongraded primary education and offers examples of successful programs. The first section describes the nongraded primary, which is characterized by developmentally appropriate curricula for primary age children, a heterogeneous community of learners as related to age and ability, support for continuous learning, a commitment to honoring the development of the whole child, and active student involvement. Proponents of the nongraded primary believe that it provides an opportunity for children to succeed rather than fail, enhances cooperation, and increases levels of community support. The second section outlines the changing roles of teachers, principals, central office staff, superintendents, local boards of education, parents, and school and community groups. Suggestions are offered for successful multiage classrooms, as well as teaching strategies for mixed-age grouping and steps for organizing the transition from a traditional to a nongraded

Language: English

Published: Arlington, Virginia: American Association of School Administrators, 1992

ISBN: 0-87652-184-7

Article

Montessori All Day, All Year

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 40, no. 3

Pages: 107-121

Child development, Children, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Social development, ⛔ No DOI found

See More

Abstract/Notes: Introducing real community into the Children's House goes back to the roots of Montessori education through all-day Montessori. The all-day environment is a house where children live with a "developmental room" of Montessori materials including a living room, kitchen, dining area, bedroom, bathroom, greeting rooms, and outdoor spaces. Practical life becomes the continuous core function of all-day Montessori. Preparing food, setting tables, doing laundry, gardening, and many other tasks become integrated into the willing self-construction of the child in this community. [This article is based on the talk presented at the NAMTA conference titled "The Social Relevance of the Montessori First Plane: Engaging Families, Building Partnerships, and Finding Common Ground with the Wider Early Childhood Community" in Dallas, TX, Jan 15-18, 2015.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Advanced Search