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703 results

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Predominantly Black Institutions and Public Montessori Schools: Reclaiming the “Genius” in African American Children

Available from: De Gruyter

Publication: Multicultural Learning and Teaching, vol. 13, no. 1

Pages: Article 20170007

, Montessori approach

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Abstract/Notes: There are more than 22,000 Montessori schools in over 100 countries worldwide. Beginning in the 1950s the American Montessori movement was primarily a private pre-school movement. There are more than 5,000 schools in the United States; over 500 of these are public. Montessori schools are an increasingly popular choice in the U.S. for public school districts looking to improve their educational outcomes. Predominantly Black Institutions (PBIs) can play a pivotal role by integrating Montessori education within their teacher preparation programs. As the demand for Montessori education increases there will be a need for more highly-qualified, culturally and linguistically diverse teachers who have the appropriate credentials and can implement the Montessori approach. Scientific research confirms that children who attend Montessori schools are advantaged academically, socially and emotionally. Communities such as Milwaukee and Chicago are now implementing Montessori education through public schools as part of school reform efforts making the educational approach more accessible to African American children.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1515/mlt-2017-0007

ISSN: 2161-2412

Article

Nurturing the Child's Spirit through Literature: An African-American Resource Guide

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 29, no. 1

Pages: 26–31

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Language: English

Article

How About Working in Africa?

Publication: Montessori International, vol. 76

Pages: 2

Africa, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 1470-8647

Doctoral Dissertation

Evaluation of the Reorganization of Northboro Elementary School in Palm Beach County, Florida: A Ten-Year Perspective

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the reorganization of Northboro Elementary School from the academic years of 1991–1992 through 2000–2001. The study was designed to determine the effectiveness of achieving five objectives established for the reorganization in two-year increments of implementation from the perspectives of the administrative staff, teachers, paraprofessionals, and parents. The reorganization objectives were (1) to develop a physically and psychologically safe environment for all students; (2) to implement a public magnet program to racially balance the population with non-Black students; (3) to increase student achievement scores on the state assessment test in the areas of reading, writing, and mathematics; (4) to increase parent involvement at the school; and (5) to improve the quality and increase the amount of staff development. Utilizing the focus group method, the 35 participants represented, 4 administrative staff, 9 paraprofessionals, 4 reading teachers, 3 regular and 6 Montessori teachers, and 9 parents. The Levels of Use of the Innovation (LoU) (Hall, Loucks, Rutherford, & Newlove, 1975) was used for the assessment of all aspects of the reorganization. As a result of the evaluation, it was determined that all the objectives were met in accordance with the LoU model. The major findings were: (1) Using an effective reorganization tool, such as the Levels of Use, gave the leader clear direction for reorganization, from orienting, to managing, and finally to integrating the use of the innovation. (2) Parent participation in the reorganization process was essential for effective teaching and learning. Parent involvement was critical in promoting a sound physically and psychologically safe environment. (3) Implementing an innovative Montessori Magnet program reduced the racial balance, and drew racially, economically, and educationally diverse students. Based on the findings, it is recommended that additional evaluations be conducted to include: (1) Examining the extent race or age had on the overall success of the reorganization. (2) Determining if the Montessori, Reading Recovery, and Levels of Use strategies are only effective at the elementary level. (3) Assessing the academic achievement of eighth- and tenth-grade students who participated in the Reading Recovery Program.

Language: English

Published: Cincinnati, Ohio, 2004

Article

New Montessori Association in the North East

Publication: Montessori Education, vol. 8, no. 2

Pages: 35

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Abstract/Notes: Upcoming inaugural meeting of North of England Montessori Association

Language: English

ISSN: 1354-1498

Article

Montessori in a Mini-City [Countryside Montessori School, Newell, North Carolina]

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: The Constructive Triangle (1974-1989), vol. 14, no. 2

Pages: 11–15

Americas, North America, United States of America

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Language: English

ISSN: 0010-700X

Article

Activities for Health and Wellbeing at Local Level: The Case Study of Karposh Municipality [North Macedonia]

Available from: Central and Eastern European Online Library

Publication: ЕВРОДИЈАЛОГ Списание за европски прашања [EURODIALOG: Journal of European Affairs], no. 23

Pages: 369-382

Europe, North Macedonia, Southern Europe

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Abstract/Notes: Health protection and social status improvement are complex processes that require multidisciplinary approach. Hereupon the complexity in planning and realization of annual programme plans regarding health and social protection of citizens realized at a local level by the Municipality of Karposh. Through the annual programme activities, the local self-government plans and promotes healthy generations that will acquire healthy eating habits and creates, i.e. provides normal psychosocial development throughout their lives. In order to contribute in this area, the Municipality of Karposh established the Department for Child, Social and Health Care. The way of work and the activities of this Department are prevention, monitoring field conditions for each issue and timely resolution of problems in accordance with the competences of the local self-government and the legislative of the Republic of Macedonia. Of particular importance is the cooperation of the Municipality with other state institutions, the non-governmental sector and the international organizations through which it exchanges knowledge and experiences. From that aspect, the Municipality of Karposh creates programme activities regarding health and social policy of children, equally including children from persons/families at social risk. A number of activities aimed at the non-institutional forms of social protection of the vulnerable groups affected by the effects of poverty and social exclusion and activities for promotion of education are realized. The activities aimed at these target groups include all children from the earliest age, and in some urban communities where the Roma or Albanian population is dominant, special attention is paid to social inclusion and preventive health care of children of these ethnicities. The public awareness of health care of the population is being raised from every aspect through professional workshops, announcements, professional presentations and trainings and other forms of education. These activities are usually conducted by social and health workers and predagogists from the Department for Child, Social and Health Protection and the NGO sector, the Ministry of Education, the Ministry of Labor and Social Policy and international educational centres such as the “Montessori” Centre. The Municipality of Karposh does not forget its “third age” citizens. Through cultural and entertaining programmes, the youngest assemble and entertain the guardians of retirement homes, “Humane patrols” active on field are organized that help in the daily life of fragile, old and ill persons that are unable to leave their homes. Through its programme activities, the Department for Child, Social and Health Care in the Municipality of Karposh encompasses all groups of citizens on the territory of the local self-government, regardless of their sex, gender, age or ethnicity.

Language: English

ISSN: 1857-6222

Article

Assistants Training Course Inaugurated in the Pacific Northwest

Publication: PNMA Newsletter

Pages: 10

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Abstract/Notes: Newsletter of the Pacific Northwest Montessori Association (Kirkland, Washington).

Language: English

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

American Institute of Instruction, North Conway, N.H., July 2-5; Montessori

Available from: HathiTrust

Publication: Journal of Education (Boston), vol. 76, no. 4

Pages: 89-90

Americas, Conferences, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, United States of America, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 0022-0574, 2515-5741

Book

The Family Star Story: The Community Led Transformation of an Abandoned Building into a Montessori Infant-Toddler-Parent Education Center in Northeast Denver

Americas, Family Star Montessori School (Denver), Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: In the late 1980s, a group of parents, teachers, and community members were concerned about an abandoned nineplex unit that sat directly across the street from an elementary school in Northeast Denver, Colorado. The school was Mitchell Elementary. Only a few years before, it had been in noncompliance with the federal court order to desegregate the Denver Public Schools. Dr. Martha M. Urioste had been assigned as the principal to bring the school out of noncompliance -- she did this in nine years by adopting a Montessori curriculum and attracting students from all over the city -- and Mitchell Montessori soon became a beacon of hope and opportunity in a neighborhood that had often felt forsaken. Next to the shining star of Mitchell Montessori, the neglected building stood in stark contrast and seemed to attract illicit activity. Many people worried for the safety of the children. Rather than wait for someone else to do something, these concerned citizens decided to adopt the building themselves and transform it into an infant-toddler-parent Montessori education center. They named the center Family Star for the child -- the nucleus of the family. This is their story.

Language: English

Published: Edgewater, Colorado: Great Work Publishing, 2016

ISBN: 978-0-692-61020-6

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