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984 results

Article

Montessori and Public School Reform: How to Survive and Prosper in a Changing Educational Climate

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 2, no. 3

Pages: 9

Educational change, Montessori method of education, Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

Resources [Publicity, Cornerstone Books, child care consultants]

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 2, no. 2

Pages: 4

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

Developing Public School Children's Houses

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 3, no. 1

Pages: 3

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Master's Thesis

Examining the Beliefs of Montessori and Public-School Teachers Toward Inclusive Education Using the Theory of Planned Behavior

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: This study examines the differences between Montessori guides and public-school teachers regarding their knowledge and implementation of inclusive practices in the classroom using the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). TPB claims that perceptions of attitudes, subjective norms, and behavioral control predict intentions to engage in a particular behavior. The present research utilized a mixed-methods approach to assess participants’ personal definitions of inclusive education and predict intention to perform inclusive practices from teachers’ attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control. Because public-school teachers are required to attend training, they were predicted to be more knowledgeable than Montessori guides about inclusive practices. Sixty-six teachers participated, but contrary to predictions, definitions provided by both public-school teachers (n = 35) and Montessori guides (n = 31) indicated poor understanding of inclusion with no differences between groups. Analysis of the TPB variables revealed significant differences in attitudes with Montessori guides expressing more positive attitudes than public-school teachers. Qualitative analyses supported this result as Montessori guides used more positive emotional terms in their definitions than public-school teachers who used more neutral terms. Multiple regression analysis showed that the TPB model predicted intention to perform inclusive practices (R2 = .73) with only perceived behavioral control and past behavior statistically significant predictors. These results indicate that despite positive attitudes, participants may lack sufficient, concrete understanding of strategies that would allow them to carry out inclusive practices. Results revealed that training is needed to clarify the definition of inclusion and provide actionable tasks for implementing inclusion in the classroom.

Language: English

Published: Killeen, Texas, 2021

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