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Doctoral Dissertation

The Effects of Montessori Teacher Training on Classroom Teaching Skills: The Public Montessori Teachers' Perspective

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: This study compares the opinions of public school teachers of their classroom teaching skills due to participation in the Montessori model of teacher training and the traditional teacher education training programs. The data were collected through a survey of 223 public Montessori schools across the United States. The design used in this study is causal comparative to establish cause and effect. The independent variable is the participation in the Montessori Model of Teacher Training. The dependent variables are the opinions of public school teachers as perceived from participation in the Montessori Model of Teacher Training. Comparisons of teacher opinions were compiled from a survey to ascertain the impact of participation in the Montessori Model of Teacher Training. The population for this study included all teachers employed in the public Montessori schools. The sample included the entire population of teachers who participated in traditional teacher training to earn state licensure and in a Montessori teacher training program. A total of thirty-eight states were included in the survey. A total of 560 surveys were received from the population sample. The teachers surveyed included 81% females and 19% males. The years of teaching experience in public schools were 0–5 years 31%; 6–10 years 28%; 11–15 years 16%; and over 15 years 25%. The years of teaching experience in Montessori schools were 0–5 years 57 %; 6–10 years 23%; 11–15 years 11%; and over 15 years 9%. The basic conclusions from this study indicated that there are significant differences, p < .05, in the responses of teachers who participated in the Montessori model of teacher training and the traditional teacher training for preparation of classroom instruction. In 11 out of the 12 survey items, the diverse approach of teaching used in the Montessori model of teacher training was perceived to be superior to traditional teacher training. However, in one survey question, the traditional teacher training was viewed superior for preparation of teaching in a whole group setting. This study suggest that the responses of teachers strongly recommend the Montessori model of teacher training.

Language: English

Published: Orangeburg, South Carolina, 1997

Doctoral Dissertation

An Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Korean Montessori Teacher Training Program as Perceived by Montessori Teachers and Parents of Montessori-Educated Children

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: During the past ten years, a total of 3,642 teachers and administrators have attended the Korean Montessori Teacher Training Program (KMTTP). A sample of Montessori teachers (n = 261) and Korean parents (n = 375) from 32 Korean Montessori schools located in the major cities of Korea were surveyed in order to evaluate the effectiveness of this teacher preparation program. The EXPECTATIONS AND GOAL ATTAINMENT QUESTIONNAIRE (EGAQ), designed by the researcher, was the instrumentation used to conduct this study. Major findings demonstrated that 74.5 percent of the teachers surveyed indicated that their main reasons for attending the KMTTP were to increase their professional competency and their knowledge of child development through Montessori philosophy. The correlation between teachers' levels of satisfaction with their preparation and perceived effectiveness of the training program was higher (r =.29, p $<$.05) than between their levels of satisfaction with the program and their perceptions of their preparedness after completion of training (r =.18, p $<$.05). Significant differences existed between perceived effectiveness of the KMTTP and teachers' ages, positions, and years of experience. Older teachers and those with more advanced teaching positions expressed greater satisfaction with the program. Teachers indicated that, upon completion of the KMTTP, they felt more prepared in, than knowledgeable of, Montessori educational methodology. From the parent perspective, the most frequently cited reason (74.3%) for sending their child to a Montessori School was to provide a learning environment that nurtured their child's interpersonal growth. A majority of the parents (58.5%) were very satisfied with the Montessori experience; no parents were dissatisfied or very dissatisfied. In correlating the effectiveness of Montessori education with specific outcomes, parents indicated highest levels of satisfaction in the areas of "concentration" and "academic achievement." A majority of the teachers surveyed (52.8%) encouraged the implementation of the Montessori Teacher Training Program in neighboring countries, with 42.1 percent strongly encouraging implementation. This study demonstrated the need for further development and improvement in the area of Montessori teacher training in Korea.

Language: English

Published: San Francisco, California, 1994

Article

Working Memory and Executive Functions: Effects of Training on Academic Achievement

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: Psychological Research, vol. 78, no. 6

Pages: 852-868

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Abstract/Notes: The aim of this review is to illustrate the role of working memory and executive functions for scholastic achievement as an introduction to the question of whether and how working memory and executive control training may improve academic abilities. The review of current research showed limited but converging evidence for positive effects of process-based complex working-memory training on academic abilities, particularly in the domain of reading. These benefits occurred in children suffering from cognitive and academic deficits as well as in healthy students. Transfer of training to mathematical abilities seemed to be very limited and to depend on the training regime and the characteristics of the study sample. A core issue in training research is whether high- or low-achieving children benefit more from cognitive training. Individual differences in terms of training-related benefits suggested that process-based working memory and executive control training often induced compensation effects with larger benefits in low performing individuals. Finally, we discuss the effects of process-based training in relation to other types of interventions aimed at improving academic achievement.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/s00426-013-0537-1

ISSN: 03400727

Doctoral Dissertation

Formação de professores no contexto das propostas pedagógicas de Rudolf Steiner (pedagogia Waldorf), Maria Montessori e da experiência da Escola da Ponte [Teacher training in the context of the pedagogical proposals of Rudolf Steiner (Waldorf pedagogy), Maria Montessori and the experience of Escola da Ponte]

Available from: Universidade Estadual Paulista "Júlio de Mesquita Filho" - Institutional Repository

Americas, Brazil, Latin America and the Caribbean, Montessori method of education - Teacher training, Montessori schools, South America, Teacher training, Waldorf method of education - Teacher training, Waldorf schools

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Abstract/Notes: O objetivo desta pesquisa foi investigar como ocorre o processo de formação de professores para atuar no contexto das propostas pedagógicas Waldorf, Montessori e experiência da Escola da Ponte, com enfoque em cursos de formação para cada uma destas propostas. Os dados foram coletados através da participação da pesquisadora como aluna de cursos de formação para cada uma das propostas, ocorridos nos períodos de 2009 a 2013, trabalho de campo em escolas que adotam as propostas referidas, conversas com professores, sete entrevistas e um questionário, com professores e/ou formadores que atuam ou atuaram nestas propostas. Os dados foram registrados em notas de campo expandidas e as entrevistas foram gravadas em áudio e transcritas. O material foi interpretado e discutido de forma qualitativa, segundo um caráter etnográfico interpretativo. Todo esse processo foi apresentado através de narrativas que revelaram a experiência vivida pela pesquisadora tanto nos cursos de formação quanto nas escolas e, também, discussões que explicitaram como ocorre o processo de formação de professores para atuar nas três propostas, destacando como o ensino de Matemática foi abordado nestas formações. Foi realizada uma reflexão sobre os temas que emergiram. Na proposta Waldorf, destacamos os pressupostos teórico-filosófico-metodológicos que a embasam, o autoconhecimento (conhecimento de si mesmo), as artes e o professor de classe (professor generalista). No método de Maria Montessori salientamos os pressupostos teórico-filosófico-metodológicos que o embasam e sua consequente atualização, a importância da prática/estágio e o autoconhecimento. Na experiência da Escola da Ponte sobressaiu-se a formação centrada na escola (destaque para o círculo de estudos). A pesquisa contribui com discussões para a formação de professores que Ensinam Matemática, apontando, em especial, para a formação interior do professor através do conhecimento de si mesmo, vertente que é considerada nas propostas Waldorf e Montessori. [The aim of this research was to investigate how the process of teacher training occurs to act in the context of the Waldorf, Montessori and Escola da Ponte pedagogical proposals, focusing on training courses for each of these proposals. Data were collected through the participation of the researcher as a student of training courses for each of the proposals, which took place in the periods from 2009 to 2013, fieldwork in schools that adopt the aforementioned proposals, conversations with teachers, seven interviews and a questionnaire, with professors and/or trainers who work or have acted on these proposals. Data were recorded in expanded field notes and interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. The material was interpreted and discussed qualitatively, according to an interpretive ethnographic character. This entire process was presented through narratives that revealed the experience lived by the researcher both in training courses and in schools, and also discussions that explained how the process of teacher training occurs to act in the three proposals, highlighting how the teaching of Mathematics was addressed in these trainings. A reflection was carried out on the themes that emerged. In the Waldorf proposal, we highlight the theoretical-philosophical-methodological assumptions that underlie it, self-knowledge (self-knowledge), the arts and the class teacher (generalist teacher). In Maria Montessori's method, we emphasize the theoretical-philosophical-methodological assumptions that underlie it and its consequent updating, the importance of practice/internship and self-knowledge. In the experience of Escola da Ponte, education centered on the school stood out (highlight for the study circle). The research contributes to discussions for the formation of teachers who Teach Mathematics, pointing, in particular, to the inner formation of the teacher through self-knowledge, an aspect that is considered in the Waldorf and Montessori proposals.]

Language: Portuguese

Published: São Paulo, Brazil, 2015

Book Section

Montessori’s Training Course

Available from: Springer Link

Book Title: America's Early Montessorians: Anne George, Margaret Naumburg, Helen Parkhurst and Adelia Pyle

Pages: 69-97

Americas, International Montessori Training Course (1st, Rome, Italy, 1913), International Montessori Training Course (2nd, Rome, Italy, 1914), Montessori Training Course (2nd, Rome, Italy, 1910), North America, Trainings, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Anne George, Adelia Pyle, Margaret Naumburg and Helen Parkhurst were all trained as directresses by Maria Montessori. George, Montessori’s first American student, took the course in 1910; Pyle and Naumburg were among the ninety students in Montessori’s First International Training Course in 1913; Parkhurst, one of eighty students, completed the Second International Training Course in 1914. Their training established their credentials in American Montessori education. Their role in the early history of the Montessori movement is largely an extension of and implementation of what they learned in the course. The training course consisted of lectures and clinical observations of Montessori classes. Montessori lectured on: (1) applying science to education; (2) the correct method of observing children; (3) using empirical techniques to render anthropological and clinical information into replicable and usable educational practices; (4) designing and using didactic apparatus and materials to develop children’s skills and abilities at crucial sensitive periods in their development. And (5) replicating the Montessori classroom, the prepared educational environment. After completing the course, George, Parkhurst and Naumburg faced the challenge of transporting and recreating the Montessori Method in the United States.

Language: English

Published: Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan, 2020

ISBN: 978-3-030-54835-3

Series: Historical Studies in Education

Article

News from the Training Centers [Good Shepherd Maria Montessori Training Centre, Colombo, Sri Lanka]

Publication: AMI Bulletin, no. 2

Pages: 7

Asia, Good Shepherd Maria Montessori Training Centre (Colombo), South Asia, Sri Lanka, Trainings

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Language: English

Conference Paper

mLearning in Primary Education: An Online Teacher Training Proposal Based on Montessori Education Principles

Available from: IATED Digital Library

12th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies

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Abstract/Notes: Mlearning is learning through digital mobile environments, making it possible to acquire, interrelate and share new knowledge through mobile devices. There is a consensus on the growth of the use of these devices for different educational actions. According to Sarrab, Elgamel & Aldabbas (2012), there are different recreational and pedagogical uses based on mlearning. According to De Araújo Junior et al (2019), these uses are based on the possibility of combining more than one methodology and learning strategies in line with students’ learning characteristics and needs. To this end, mlearning seeks to integrate learning theories, especially constructivist and behavioral theories to also create collaborative working environments (Crompton, Burke & Gregory, 2017). The greatest advantage of mlearning is the possibility of it being applied pedagogically beyond the school environment, with the participation of families and with various proposals for interaction between teacher-student, student-student, and teacher-student-families. This whole range of possibilities has created a new field of study. By overcoming the design approach on mlearning environments and their different effects (Devinder Singh & Zaitun, 2006), a new line of research is becoming relevant: the role of teachers and their training in the use of this technology. Sanchez-Prieto & Hernández García (2019) point out that despite its advantages, the number of teachers using this technology is still very limited. A bibliographic review of 7 scientific articles related to the use of mlearning in primary classes within different educational contexts identified that teachers still lack, not only technical and/or pedagogical but also comprehensive training, making it difficult for them to become familiar with this technology and applying it as another teaching tool in their primary classes. Considering the needs found regarding digital teacher competence, the basis of digital interaction between teacher-student-families and the assessment, selection, and design of didactic contents, this study is an integral part of the Koulu I +D project (Mobile learning in primary education) number ID19-XX-003, aims to present a proposal for teacher training taught within an online learning environment. It does so regarding the basis, application and use of mlearning in primary classes based on the principles of Montessori education: personal choice of the student, collaborative learning, self-direction, the teacher as a guide and learning by discovery. To this end, the training model is based on these points to guide the work using mlearning by considering the characteristics and needs of primary education, regardless of the tool’s typology. The training proposal is based on providing the necessary teaching knowledge to conduct the pedagogical work at the comprehension, application and assessment levels of mlearning in primary classes. The training was designed as an online format to overcome the first barrier for some teachers: the use of technology. The defined points of training to meet the demands of the application in primary classes are: Digital teacher competence, Montessori and Mlearning Pedagogy, Pedagogical tools and the possibilities of primary education and mlearning Assessment in primary education.

Language: English

Published: Online Conference: International Academy of Technology, Education and Development (IATED), 2020

Pages: 7979-7983

DOI: 10.21125/edulearn.2020.2004

ISBN: 978-84-09-17979-4

Article

Montessori Elementary Teacher Training Study Project Cleveland Report on Training Centers

Publication: NAMTA Quarterly, vol. 9, no. 2

Pages: 61-63

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Language: English

Article

Training Center Focus: Montana Montessori Teacher Training Institute

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 22, no. 2

Pages: 21

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Language: English

Article

MTTI Takes Training on the Road [Montessori Teacher Training Institute course in Savannah, GA]

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 22, no. 1

Pages: 20

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Language: English

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Montessori in Indigenous Communities
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