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589 results

Article

The ABCs (Alternative and Better Choices) of Good Nutrition

Publication: Tomorrow's Child, vol. 14, no. 2

Pages: 33–34

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Abstract/Notes: includes apple and avocado recipes

Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

Trust Tutoring Offers Child-First Alternative

Publication: Montessori Observer, vol. 27, no. 1

Pages: 1

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Language: English

ISSN: 0889-5643

Article

ACE [Americans for Choice in Education] Offers Alternative to Federal Recognition of Accreditation

Publication: Montessori Observer, vol. 15, no. 1

Pages: 1, 4

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Language: English

ISSN: 0889-5643

Article

Twenty Alternatives to Punishment

Publication: Montessori Matters, no. 1

Pages: 14–15

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Language: English

Article

Between Testing and Guessing: Alternative Assessment for the Young Montessori Child

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 3, no. 3

Pages: 32–35

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Montessori as an American Public School Alternative

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: The Constructive Triangle (1974-1989), vol. 3, no. 1

Pages: 6-15

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 0010-700X

Article

Alternatives to Traditional Homework

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 6, no. 2

Pages: 7

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Effects of Grading on Student Learning and Alternative Assessment Strategies

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was to investigate what effect an alternative assessment strategy would have on students’ engagement, motivation, and overall learning in an urban, private Montessori middle school program located in the Midwest. Two teachers and 13 students participated in two phases (one social studies and one science unit) over the course of six weeks. Teacher-assigned grades on class and homework were removed and replaced with student-determined final grades based on self-assessment using collaboratively created rubrics and individual portfolios. Students kept daily learning logs and completed a pre- and post-unit survey designed to measure their level of engagement, motivation, and learning preferences. The researcher kept daily observational notes as well as tallies of behavioral markers for engagement and disengagement. Students were also invited to give open-ended feedback about their experience at the end of the intervention. The results showed that while the alternative assessment model did not have a direct impact on students’ daily engagement or intrinsic motivation, it did increase students’ understanding of how their work correlated to a final grade in the unit, and it created opportunities for students to make connections to their learning and thus more actively plan their future work. Additionally, a direct correlation appeared between the level of student activity and student engagement in classes, indicating the importance of reducing passivity as much as possible in the daily learning process.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2017

Article

Modular Buildings: An Economical Alternative

Publication: Tomorrow's Child, vol. 2, no. 4

Pages: 14–16

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Doctoral Dissertation (Ph.D.)

Literacy Outcomes of Montessori-Trained Students Under Alternative Instructional Conditions

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of the study was to investigate differences in literacy outcomes of Montessori-trained students under alternative instructional conditions in first grade. As a method of instruction, Montessori has not been adequately researched in the area of literacy to verify its efficacy in educating students. Previous studies compared Montessori students to non-Montessori students; therefore, the findings were open to the criticism that private school students enjoyed an a priori advantage over their public school counterparts. In this study, all participants had Montessori preschool experience. Roughly half the subjects chose public school and half chose to continue at Montessori for first grade. Sociofunctional linguistics, educational psychology, and Montessori's writing on education provided theoretical underpinnings for the study. A mixed research design was employed. Qualitative observations were conducted over a period of a calendar year. Quantitative measures were taken in a pretest/posttest format on five different literacy measures. Qualitative results show the core theme of the classroom was child-centeredness. This assertion was supported by five separate categories that emerged from observation. Quantitative results indicate that Montessori-trained students in alternative instructional conditions fared better on literacy measures than their counterparts who remained at Montessori for first grade. These results, along with methodological innovations for using literate register cohesion and genre analysis in literacy research, contribute to the educational research base in literacy studies.

Language: English

Published: West Lafayette, Indiana, 2005

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