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Article

Math Tracks: What Pace in Math Is Best for the Middle School Child?

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 23, no. 4

Pages: 26-35

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Mathematics is a critical part of academic preparation of the middle school child, or, as Dr. Maria Montessori would refer to them, children in the third plane of development. Montessori educators are sincere in their endeavors not only to prepare young students for further studies of math and the application of math in their world and careers, but also to build their confidence and ignite interest in the beauty of mathematics. In this article, the author describes the results of her study on Math tracks in Montessori middle schools and what serves the child best in preparation for high school. Three groups were surveyed: (1) alumni of Princeton Montessori Middle School; (2) math department heads of the high schools Princeton Montessori Middle School students attend most; and (3) other middle school program heads (Montessori, private, and public). (Contains 6 online resources.)

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Montessori Middle School and the Transition to High School: Student Narratives

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 6, no. 2

Americas, High school students, Middle school students, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This narrative study investigated through storytelling the experiences of five students who attended a Montessori middle school and then transitioned to a public high school. The testimonies of the participants highlighted that, to help students make a successful transition to high school, it is useful to consider three elements: (a) developing academic and social-emotional skills, (b) fostering positive attitudes toward learning, and (c) creating opportunities to practice self-reliance, self-advocacy, and grit. The experience of these particular students accentuates the ability of a Montessori middle school to emphasize both academic rigor and the social-emotional skills that build the fortitude necessary for students to successfully transition to high school. This study suggests that Montessori middle school practices may foster the intellectual and emotional growth of students so that they can successfully transition to high school and are potentially buffered from many of the detrimental academic and emotional impacts of ninth grade.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v6i2.13854

ISSN: 2378-3923

Doctoral Dissertation

Examining Montessori Middle School Through a Self-Determination Theory Lens: A Mixed Methods Study of the Lived Experiences of Adolescents

Available from: University of California eScholarship

Self-determination, Self-determination theory

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori education was developed over a century ago. Dr. Montessori and her followers designed learning environments to meet the academic, social and psychological needs of students from eighteen months to eighteen years old. Within her writings and books, Dr. Montessori described strategies and structures that support autonomy, competence and relatedness. These same supports are found within Self-determination Theory (SDT) literature. Research points towards a link between satisfaction of the basic needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness and increased resilience, goal achievement, and feelings of well-being. . This study examined the influence of enrollment on the development of self- determination in a Montessori middle school which is intentionally created to support the development of autonomy, competence, and relatedness on adolescents. Bounded by self-determination, critical, and student voice theory, this research was designed to give voice to the most important stakeholders in education, add to the discourse on middle school reform, and provide the perspective of the student to the critique of middle level education. Based on the analysis of narrative, the major themes which represented all participants in all cycles were indicators of the importance of autonomy and relatedness. Two themes, "choose type of work", "choose order of tasks" illustrate the importance of autonomy to this group of students. The last major theme, "help me stay on top of things" highlighted the importance of relatedness to the study group. From these themes implications for middle level educators, educational leaders and future researchers were developed. Participants in the study voiced strong opinions about practices which supported autonomy and relatedness. Students valued the ability to choose the order of their tasks and the tasks they could choose to demonstrate understanding as well as the ability to re-take tests. These changes require a paradigm shift to a student- centered learning environment. Educational leaders can support this shift through providing staff development and planning time. Future research suggested by this study include studies which could further examine a possible link between relatedness support and student achievement and studies designed to capture the voices of students with a low measured SDT

Language: English

Published: San Diego, California, 2013

Article

Dealing with Diversity: Middle-Class Family Households and the Issue of 'Black' and 'White' Schools in Amsterdam

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: Urban Studies, vol. 50, no. 6

Pages: 1130-1147

Europe, Holland, Netherlands, Western Europe

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Abstract/Notes: The urban middle classes often celebrate the diversity of their neighbourhood. As soon as they have children, however, the desire to display symbolic capital may conflict with the need to reproduce cultural capital through the educational system. In the ethnically diverse Amsterdam schooling context, in which parents have free school choice and school access is not determined by fees, the socio-spatial strategies of school choice could be expected to differ from particularly the UK context. Based on in-depth interviews conducted with white middle-class parents in Amsterdam, this study argues that ethnic diversity is a major concern when they are seeing primary schools for their children, but that middle-class fractions have different socio-spatial strategies for managing it. It is argued that, despite differences in terms of housing market and school policies, the strategies of the Amsterdam middle classes are very similar to other contexts, suggesting homologies of class between national contexts.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1177/0042098012461673

ISSN: 0042-0980

Article

Politics Rife as Educators Meet: East and South Try to Line Up Middle West and Coast for Candidates; Leaders to Be Heard: David Starr Jordan, Mme. Montessori and others to Address Sessions

Available from: California Digital Newspaper Collection

Publication: Sacramento Union (Sacramento, California)

Pages: 3

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Abstract/Notes: "...Among the speakers schedule for department addresses are scores of noted national, and world educators. Among these are: Mme. Maria Montessori, originator of the system child education bearing her name..."

Language: English

Article

Building Success into Your Montessori Middle School Program

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 19, no. 4

Pages: 34-39

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori middle schools can be immensely successful and highly beneficial to students. Traditional schools notice differences in students who come from Montessori backgrounds; they find them to be adaptable self-starters who often take on leadership roles. Prestigious high schools seek to recruit Montessori middle school graduates. As more parents seek alternative educational plans for the teen years, often deemed the most difficult, more Montessori programs, both public and private, appropriately strive to meet this need. The value of adolescent programs that provide a holistic, substantive, and developmentally based experience for their students is becoming more recognized. In this article, the author provides a list of guidelines to consider when developing a successful Montessori program for middle school students.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Report

A Comparative Study of the Effects of Preschool Education on Middle Class Children

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Abstract/Notes: To determine whether preschool education benefits middle-class elementary school children, a study was conducted which compared the social, motor, and academic progress of kindergarten and elementary school children who had attended a Montessori preschool, another kind of preschool, or no preschool. The sample was chosen according to age, attendance at preschool, and social class. A total of 201 middle-class children between the ages of 64 and 128 months participated in the study. Of those children participating 151 had attended a nursery, day care, or private school prior to entry into kindergarten for 3 or more days a week, for either half or full days. Each of the three groups of subjects contained five age levels roughly corresponding to kindergarten through fourth grade levels. The Developmental Profile II, given in the form of a parent interview, and parent and teacher questionnaires were used to obtain background information and data on children's abilities. The profile indicated the child's development in months on physical, self-help, social, academic, and communication scales. Generally, results indicated that middle-class children in the primary grades, regardless of preschool background, seem to function at the same level. Results and implications are discussed, conclusions are offered, and graphs and tables of data are included in the report.

Language: English

Published: Puce, Ontario, Canada, Jul 1982

Article

Middle School Students’ Motivation and Quality of Experience: A Comparison of Montessori and Traditional School Environments

Available from: The University of Chicago Press Journals

Publication: American Journal of Education, vol. 111, no. 3

Pages: 341-371

Comparative education, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Motivation (Psychology)

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Abstract/Notes: This study compared the motivation and quality of experience of demographically matched students from Montessori and traditional middle school programs. Approximately 290 students responded to the Experience Sampling Method (ESM) and filled out questionnaires. Multivariate analyses showed that the Montessori students reported greater affect, potency (i.e., feeling energetic), intrinsic motivation, flow experience, and undivided interest (i.e., the combination of high intrinsic motivation and high salience or importance) while engaged in academic activities at school. The traditional middle school students reported higher salience while doing academic work; however, such responses were often accompanied by low intrinsic motivation. When engaged in informal, nonacademic activities, the students in both school contexts reported similar experiences. These results are discussed in terms of current thought on motivation in education and middle school reform.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1086/428885

ISSN: 0195-6744, 1549-6511

Article

Toward More Joyful Learning: Integrating Play Into Frameworks of Middle Grades Teaching

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: American Educational Research Journal, vol. 51, no. 6

Pages: 1227-1255

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Abstract/Notes: Recent efforts to define qualities of effective teaching practice have done little to capture the role of play, imagination, and creativity in classroom teaching. Drawing on theories of play and data from a two-year case study that included classroom observations, interviews, artifact collection, and surveys, the author examines the ways in which elements of play were present across the practice of eight novice middle grades teachers. Building on examples of play in these classrooms, the author proposes adding the dimension of play to frameworks of middle grades teaching—a dimension that encompasses young adolescents' engagement in classroom work that involves choice and self-direction, imaginative creations, and a nonstressed state of interest and joy.

Language: English

DOI: 10.3102/0002831214549451

ISSN: 0002-8312, 1935-1011

Conference Paper

Evaluation of Multi-Age Team (MAT) Implementation at Crabapple Middle School: Report for 1994-1995

Available from: ERIC

Annual Conference of the National Middle School Association (23nd, Baltimore, Maryland, October 31-November 3, 1996)

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Abstract/Notes: In fall 1993, administrators and faculty at the Crabappple Middle School in Roswell, Georgia, implemented the Multi-Age Team (MAT) program, creating multi-age teams of sixth-, seventh-, and eighth-grade students. The projects' main goal was to enhance self-esteem. Additional goals included implementation of interdisciplinary, thematic instruction; flexible scheduling; and Project Adventure, a program designed to build leadership, group relationships, and self-confidence. Other goals included the development of critical thinking, cooperative learning, hands-on learning, and inclusion grouping for learning disabled and gifted students. This 1994-95 report describes the evaluation procedures used, data collected, and the interpretation of the results. The quantitative data collected for the MAT and comparison student groups included the Iowa Test of Basic Skills (ITBS) results, Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory (SEI) scores, and attendance and behavior referral data. The ITBS math

Language: English

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