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511 results

Article

I nuovi programmi delle elementari e la formazione degli insegnanti

Available from: Atlante Montessori

Publication: Vita dell'Infanzia (Opera Nazionale Montessori), vol. 33, no. 1

Pages: 38-41

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Language: Italian

ISSN: 0042-7241

Article

I programmi per l'insegnamento della storia

Available from: Atlante Montessori

Publication: Vita dell'Infanzia (Opera Nazionale Montessori), vol. 34, no. 11-12

Pages: 33-44

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Language: Italian

ISSN: 0042-7241

Doctoral Dissertation (Ph.D.)

Teacher and Director Beliefs About Their Simultaneous Implementation of the Montessori Method and Quebec's Educational Programme

Available from: Concordia University - Institutional Repository

Americas, Canada, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, Perceptions

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Abstract/Notes: Teachers and directors of early childhood education and care (ECEC) centres in Quebec have to conform to provincial guidelines when implementing their educational programme. Those in centres that identify as Montessori are simultaneously faced with the sometimes-conflicting directives of the Montessori method and Ministry guidelines. This dissertation responds to the dilemma of facing such a dual frame of reference. I report the results of an investigation which explores the beliefs and reflections on the experiences of teachers and directors in four ECEC centres that identify as Montessori in the province of Quebec. Based on a review of the literature, I designed a mixed method project with two related studies. Study 1 was a questionnaire targeted towards Ministry-recognized centres in the province of Quebec that identify as Montessori. Results from this initial study helped to paint the current landscape with data collected from 25 Montessori-inspired centres in the province, and also provided a source for recruitment of potential participants for Study 2. The second study was a deeper investigation, which used a qualitative design to explore the beliefs of teachers and directors from four individual centres that identified as Montessori. The study explored teacher and director beliefs about their implementation of the Montessori method and of Quebec’s educational programme. This was pursued through the use of questionnaires, interviews, and document reviews that provided rich descriptions of the phenomenon under study. Thematic analysis of the data led to five core themes, which emerged inductively from facing the dual frame of reference, namely: each child is unique, pedagogical approaches promoting children’s learning and development, teacher’s role in promoting children’s learning and development, parent’s role in promoting children’s learning and development, and challenges faced in promoting children’s potential. However, besides the noted similarities in beliefs, variations and contradictions also appeared. The results indicate that distinctions in beliefs - both among participants and within centres - emerged particularly around the notions of free play, pretense, creativity, and parental involvement. On this basis, further research is recommended to explore the effects of such suggested inconsistencies in Montessori programme implementation on both practical and scholarly platforms.

Language: English

Published: Montreal, Quebec, Canada, 2022

Doctoral Dissertation (Ph.D.)

Analysis of Three Programs for Preschool Disadvantaged Children

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Language: English

Published: Chicago, Illinois, 1968

Doctoral Dissertation (Ph.D.)

The Cognitive Effects of Pre-School Programs for Disadvantaged Children

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Language: English

Published: Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1970

Doctoral Dissertation (Ed.D.)

School-Wide Reading Assessment in a Montessori Program

Available from: American Montessori Society

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Language: English

Published: Newark, Delaware, 2006

Doctoral Dissertation (Ed.D.)

Using a Creativity-Focused Science Program to Foster General Creativity in Young Children: A Teacher Action Research Study

Available from: American Montessori Society

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: he importance of thinking and problem-solving skills, and the ability to integrate and analyze information has been recognized and yet may be lacking in schools. Creativity is inherently linked to problem finding, problem solving, and divergent thinking (Arieti, 1976; Csikszentmihalyi, 1990; Milgram, 1990). The importance of early childhood education and its role in the formation of young minds has been recognized (Caine & Caine, 1991; Montessori, 1967a, 1967b; Piaget, 1970). Early childhood education also impacts creativity (Gardner, 1999). The features of brain-based learning (Caine & Caine, 1991; Jensen, 1998; Sousa, 2001; Wolfe, 2001) have a clear connection to nurturing the creative potential in students. Intrinsic motivation and emotions affect student learning and creativity as well (Hennessey & Amabile, 1987). The purpose of this study was to discern if a creativity-focused science curriculum for the kindergarteners at a Montessori early learning center could increase creativity in students. This action research study included observations of the students in two classrooms, one using the creativity-focused science curriculum, and the other using the existing curriculum. The data collected for this interpretive study included interviews with the students, surveys and interviews with their parents and teachers, teacher observations, and the administration of Torrance's (1981) Thinking Creatively in Action and Movement (TCAM) test. The interpretation of the data indicated that the enhanced science curriculum played a role in enhancing the creativity of the children in the creativity-focused group. The results of the TCAM (Torrance, 1981) showed a significant increase in scores for the children in the creativity-focused group. The qualitative data revealed a heightened interest in science and the observation of creative traits, processes, and products in the creativity-focused group children. The implications of this study included the need for meaningful learning experiences, experiential learning opportunities, critical thinking and problem solving activities, and an emphasis on freedom, independence, and autonomy on the part of the learner. These elements, when combined with an integrated science curriculum, can foster creativity in young children.

Language: English

Published: Santa Barbara, California, 2005

Doctoral Dissertation

Executive Function, Social-Emotional Skills, and Academic Competence in Three Preschool Programmes: Pathways to School Readiness

Available from: British Library - EthOS

Academic achievement, Comparative education, Executive function, Preschool education, Social emotional learning

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Abstract/Notes: Research findings indicate that executive function (EF), social-emotional skills, and pre-academic competence significantly promote children's school readiness and later success. School readiness broadly refers to a combination of skills necessary to function successfully in school and lack thereof may increase the risk of children's school problems. Therefore, it is essential for school systems to provide appropriate and timely support to the development of these fundamental skills. The present study focused on three particular preschool programmes: Montessori, Reggio Emilia, and the traditional play-based (British Columbia Early Learning Framework: BCEFL) programmes in Western Canada. Although they are popular, there is little empirical research that examines and compares the benefits of these programmes to the development of school readiness skills. As such, the present study aimed to 1) determine the effectiveness of these three preschool programmes in Western Canada on the development of children's school readiness; and 2) examine other sources of influences in the child, family and school in relation to the development of school readiness skills. Overall, 119 preschool children (48 Montessori, 42 Reggio Emilia, 29 BCELF) participated in the study. Observation was conducted once in the autumn of 2015 for each classroom using the CLASS observation tool. Teachers and parents of participating children filled in a series of questionnaires regarding the quality of their relationship with their child and their perceptions of daily EF and social-emotional skills of their child. The researcher also assessed individual children's fluid intelligence, EF, and pre-academic competence. The results showed that 1) although Montessori education appeared to be the most effective in facilitating numeracy skills, no curriculum stood out as notably more effective than any of the others at improving other areas of school readiness skills; 2) well-run classrooms where teachers were effective in time, behavioural, and attention management were most effective in promoting children's numeracy skills; 3) EF, social-emotional skills, and pre-academic competence exhibited an overlapping developmental process over time; 4) relational quality in both home and school environments significantly affected the development of school readiness skills, especially social-emotional skills; and 5) adults' perceptions of children's EF and social-emotional skills had a significant consequence for how teachers and parents formed their relationships with their children.

Language: English

Published: Oxford, England, 2018

Master's Thesis

Circle Time Norms in Early Childhood Montessori Programs: A Survey of Montessori Teachers Across the United States

Available from: MINDS@UW River Falls

Americas, Montessori method of education, Montessori method of education - Teachers, North America, Rituals, Teachers, Three-hour work cycle, United States of America, Work periods

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Abstract/Notes: This study examined the nature of circle time within early childhood Montessori classrooms in the United States of America. We explored literature pertaining to the history and development of circle time as well as circle time research in preschool and kindergarten settings. Unable to find writings or research specific to Montessori circle time practices, we crafted a 30-question survey for early childhood Montessori teachers to determine basic information about their circle time approaches. The survey asked participants about demographic information, circle time logistics, circle time activities, reactions to circle time, planning and preparation, and the morning work cycle. Using social media and direct emails, we gathered over 300 responses from 50 states and the District of Columbia; a total of 276 participants completed the full survey. Results focused on five different areas: time - the frequency, duration, and scheduling of circle time; attendance - who joined circle time and for how long; teacher preparation - participants’ training and planning approaches; circle time programming - the most common and popular activities; the morning work cycle – its relation to circle time. Results revealed that 92% of survey participants have circle time every day or most days; most participants hold circle time as the last event of the morning for generally 20 minutes or less; the most common circle time events were show and tell, calendar work, vocabulary lessons, Grace and Courtesy lessons, read aloud discussions, dancing and movement, snack time, general conversation, read aloud (stories), and birthday celebrations. Most participants had a work cycle that lasts less than three hours. This study promotes reflection on the importance and meaning of circle time in Montessori classrooms in relation to its apparent absence in Dr. Montessori’s writings.

Language: English

Published: River Falls, Wisconsin, 2021

Report

Final Evaluation Report of the Montessori Pre-School Program

Available from: ERIC

Americas, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - Evaluation, Montessori schools, North America, Preschool education, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This report presents evaluative information on the 1973-74 John Burroughs Montessori Pre-School Program, a project which successfully adapts the Montessori method to the public school setting. Specifically, the report describes: (1) the program in terms of its objectives and philosophy; (2) the characteristics of participants in the program; (3) the range of data used in the evaluation, presentation, and analysis; (4) plans for the program during the 1974-75 school year, including recommended changes in the program and its evaluation which will enhance the overall effectiveness of the program.

Language: English

Published: Baltimore, Maryland, 1974

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