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873 results

Book

Beginning French with Preschoolers: A Montessori Handbook

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Language: English

Published: Ithaca, New York: Montessori Workshop, 1980

ISBN: 0-915676-04-4

Article

Preschool Partners with Public Schools for Grant

Available from: Advantage Preservation - Catholic Messenger

Publication: The Catholic Messenger (Davenport, Iowa), vol. 127, no. 3

Pages: 9

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Language: English

ISSN: 0008-8234

Report

Cognitive Style, Exploratory Behavior and Verbal Fluency in Montessori and Non-Montessori Trained Preschoolers [Preliminary Report]

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Language: English

Published: Ontario, Canada, 1971

Thesis (unpublished)

An Exploratory Attempt to Evaluate the Extent to Which Effects of Montessori Preschool Are Noteable in the Home

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Language: English

Published: Chicago, Illinois, 1967

Book Section

History and Background of Preschool Intervention Programs and the Consortium for Longitudinal Studies

Book Title: As the Twig is Bent: Lasting Effects of Preschool Programs

Pages: 1-31

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Language: English

Published: Hillsdale, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1983

ISBN: 0-89859-271-2 978-0-89859-271-9

Video Recording

What is Montessori Preschool?

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Abstract/Notes: An introduction to the philosophy, psychology, and methodology associated with Montessori education for the preschool child.

Runtime: 11 minutes

Language: English

Published: Burton, Ohio, 1998

Autodisciplina en niños de edad preescolar a través del método Montessori (4-7 años) [Self-discipline in preschool-age children through the Montessori method (4-7 years)]

Americas, Latin America and the Caribbean, South America, Venezuela

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Language: Spanish

Published: Caracas, Venezuela, 1983

Master's Thesis

Scaffolds and Spelling in Preschool: Using a Movable Alphabet to Measure Early Literacy

Available from: Harvard Library

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Abstract/Notes: Understanding young children’s spelling abilities may provide unique insight into their overall linguistic development as well as assist in identifying children at risk for reading difficulties in ways that typical reading assessments cannot (Chua, Rickard Liow, & Yeong, 2016; Clemens, Oslund, Simmons, & Simmons, 2014; Hofslundsengen, Hagtvet, & Gustafsson, 2016; McBride-Chang, 1998; Ouellette & Sénéchal, 2017). Yet, spelling assessments are not commonly conducted before Kindergarten (age 5) and no normed instrument exists for 3- to 4-year-olds. When spelling assessments designed for 5-year-olds are administered to younger children, young children get lower scores (Clemens, et al., 2014; Puranik & Apel, 2010). These lower scores may reflect their less developed spelling ability (typical development) but they may also be influenced by aspects of development unrelated to spelling: lack of motor ability to write letters, working memory limitations, poor word choice of items to be spelled, and/or insensitive scoring systems (Apel, Wolter, & Masterson, 2006; Clemens, et al., 2014; Diamond, 2013; Puranik & Apel, 2010). These latter possibilities raise the question of what would happen if we controlled these factors. Would a preschool spelling assessment that did not require handwriting and that minimized working memory demands result in higher spelling scores than a handwritten assessment? Specifically, is a movable alphabet spelling assessment a more reliable, valid, and sensitive way of measuring spelling abilities in children younger than 5 than is a handwritten assessment? The present study employed a within-subjects quasi-experimental design in which the spelling of 3- to 4-year-old children was assessed using a movable alphabet and handwriting. Results indicated that (1) preschoolers scored higher on a movable alphabet spelling assessment than on a handwritten assessment, (2) word choice did influence results, (3) movable alphabet spelling scores were a significantly stronger predictor of phonemic awareness and letter knowledge scores than handwritten spelling scores, (4) children were more willing to attempt to spell words with the movable alphabet than with handwriting, and (5) assessment scores were not closely tied to age or measures of behavior. To date, few if any other studies have specifically evaluated the influence of different tools on capturing the spelling abilities of preschoolers. This study expands current knowledge about the influence of motor and working memory scaffolds on the word-building capacities of 3- to 4-year-olds.

Language: English

Published: Cambridge, Massachusetts, 2017

Report

Investigations of Classroom and At-Home Interventions: Research and Development Program on Preschool Disadvantaged Children. Final Report. [3 volumes]

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: To determine the relative effectiveness of different methods of preschool educational intervention for disadvantaged children, comparisons were made of five programs whose levels of structure ranged from the traditional nursery school to a highly structured preschool. Subjects were 79 4-year-olds representing a wide range of ability levels. Intervention effects were evaluated at the end of the preschool year and also, at the end of the kindergarten year. Follow-up data were collected at the end of first grade for three of the programs. Preliminary results were differential and encouraging for the more structured programs. The ameliorative preschool provided a framework for the subsequent investigation of related variables: effects of initiating the program with 3-year-old, low IQ children, and the feasibility of using paraprofessional staff as teachers. Included in this report are studies undertaken to provide instructional programs for children under 3 years and to find techniques to train mothers in home intervention. (MS)

Language: English

Published: Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, May 1969

Report

Evaluation of Early Childhood Education: A Model Cities-Supported Preschool Program

Academic achievement, Americas, Child development, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, North America, United States of America, Urban education

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Abstract/Notes: A Head Start Program operating in Kansas City since 1965 was viewed as inadequate because enrollment was limited to about 600 children per year. The Model Cities Agency determined to provide a program for the remainder of the children in the Model Cities neighborhoods. The programs developed were differentiated administratively for the purposes of this evaluation and the program considered a single entity and referred to as Early Childhood Education. These questions were developed as evaluation goals: What specific educational approaches were provided?; To what degree do the children grow to the stated objectives?; Do these programs meet the emotional, social, physical, and intellectual needs of the program's four-year-old children?; Do these children grow differentially?; Are specified goals reached as anticipated by staff?; What program differences account for student growth differences?; Do parents in the parent education component change relevant to their children's development?; Are these programs complementary with kindergarten programs of urban schools?; What are the effects of staff development activities?; Is program administration effective?; Are children with special problems provided assistance in achievement of program objectives?; And what program changes should be made? Each question is treated in succession and is detailed. Summaries giving the main thrust are provided after each section. (RC)

Language: English

Published: Kansas City, Missouri, Sep 1971

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