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926 results

Article

Montessori Education and Environmental Education Walk Hand-in-Hand

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 24, no. 3

Pages: 6–9

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Language: English

Article

Montessori education for environmental education

Publication: Montessori Voices [Montessori Aotearoa New Zealand], no. 77

Pages: 21

⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 1178-6213, 2744-662X

Article

Montessori Education and Modern Psychology [Excerpts from Education for Human Development]

Publication: AMI/USA News, vol. 6, no. 2

Pages: 3–6

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Language: English

Master's Thesis

A Study Comparing the Effect of Multiage Education Practices versus Traditional Education Practices on Academic Achievement

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: This study compared the effects of multi-age classroom strategies to those of traditional classroom strategies on the academic achievement of fourth grade students in reading and math. Standardized test scores from 20 fourth-grade students in two multi-age third- and fourth-grade classrooms were compared to the scores of 20 students from 7 traditional fourth-grade classrooms. The Stanford Achievement Test (SAT), ninth edition was used as the test instrument. Scores from the students' third grade test in the 1996-97 school year were compared to their scores from the fourth grade test in reading and math by applying T-tests to the data. Analysis of the data revealed no difference in reading or math achievement between students taught in a multi-age classroom and those from a traditional classroom.

Language: English

Published: Salem, West Virginia, 1998

Article

Early Childhood Education According to Abdurrahman An-Nahlawi and Maria Montessori

Available from: Al-Athfal: Jurnal Pendidikan Anak

Publication: Al-Athfal: Jurnal Pendidikan Anak [Journal of Child Education], vol. 6, no. 2

Pages: 121-134

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Abstract/Notes: This research is motivated by the concept of Early Childhood Education offered by various educational figures to impact the emergence of increasingly dynamic educational theories. Issues on this concept did not escape the attention of Abdurrahman An-Nahlawi and Maria Montessori. The two figures have similarities and differences in their underlying points of view and approaches, and these cannot be separated from the philosophical study behind them. Based on the above, this study explores the two figures’ thoughts to give birth to a new paradigm of education for early childhood. The research method used was a literature study by collecting various references that can support research. From the research results, it can be found that, philosophically, the concept of Early Childhood Education, according to Abdurrahman An-Nahlawi, is attached to the perennial normative approach, while Maria Montessori’s notion is more towards a constructivism approach. The two approaches have different points of view in highlighting the educational side. The similarity in the points of view of these two figures is an understanding of the concept of education, which should be integrated and contextual, and position the child as the main subject in education.

Language: English

DOI: 10.14421/al-athfal.2020.62-03

ISSN: 2477-4189, 2477-4715

Article

Evaluating Student Food Selections After a Nutrition Education Intervention in a Montessori Community School

Available from: The Annals of Family Medicine

Publication: The Annals of Family Medicine, vol. 20, no. Supplement 1

Pages: Submission 3129

Montessori schools, Nutrition education

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Abstract/Notes: Context: Schools are unique sites for nutrition education interventions due to their ability to provide educational activities as well as meals, allowing for observation of behavior change. Nutrition education and physical activity awareness programs implemented in the school setting have the potential to positively impact students’ eating habits. Eating habits are developed at a young age, but few efforts have been made to deliver and assess education interventions in the pre-K through grade 3 age group. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate student food selections before and after a nutrition education intervention was implemented in a Montessori school. Human Subjects Review: Approved as non-regulated research by the UTSW IRB. Study Design: Retrospective exploratory analysis. Setting: A single Montessori community school with students in grades pre-K through grade 3. Instrument: Aggregate lunch food selection data, including total food items offered and total food items left over, via daily production records. Main Outcome Measures: Records were collected from three school years to compare the food acceptability – the percent of food item taken from the total offered - of fruit (F), vegetable (V), F&V, 0% milk, 1% milk, and all milks before and after the implementation of the intervention program. Food acceptability served as a proxy for food consumption. Results: In all years, fruit (82.88%) and all milks (81.74%) were well accepted by students, but vegetables (62.00%) were not. The study found that from year 1 to year 2, there were statistically significant (p <0.0001) decreases in intake in all categories. This trend continued when comparing year 1 to year 3. Conclusions: Prior studies show that even in successful interventions, when vegetable or F&V intake does increase, changes are minimal. These findings corroborate the difficulties prior studies have demonstrated in changing students’ food selections for the better, particularly regarding vegetable consumption. This analysis of production records showed a decline in acceptability of foods over the three years. It is unclear if these changes are directly related to the instructional program, due to the presence of confounding factors. Future studies should attempt to reevaluate nutrition education and subsequently conduct a plate-waste study for a more accurate representation of food consumption before and after an intervention.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1370/afm.20.s1.3129

ISSN: 1544-1709, 1544-1717

Article

An Expansion of Practice: Special Education and Montessori Public School

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: International Journal of Inclusive Education

Pages: 1-20

Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, People with disabilities, Public Montessori, Special education

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Abstract/Notes: The choices for public school education in the United States have evolved to include Montessori programmes. As a result, special education practices have become visible in Montessori, making collaboration essential. The exploration of how Montessori and special education teachers collaborate through the identified constructs of (a) shared planning, (b) frequent communication, (c) shared vision, (d) mutual respect, and (e) joint trust despite the evident philosophical differences is important for students in inclusion. Data sources included in-depth interviews with teachers to identify patterns related to collaboration in Montessori public schools. Findings indicated that there is a need to establish a clear plan for connecting philosophies and for collaboration for students in inclusion, not only in the context of United States public Montessori programmes, but for Montessori practitioners in other regions and school settings. Recommendations include using a terminology comparison activity in teacher professional development and implementing an Inclusion Professional Learning Community to address the barrier of time to proactively create deep collaborative relationships built upon the established collaborative constructs.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/13603116.2021.1931717

ISSN: 1360-3116

Book

Report on the Montessori System of Education: Presented to the Council of Education, Witwatersrand

Africa, L. C. Wynsouw - Writings, South Africa, Southern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa

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Language: English

Published: Johannesburg, South Africa: Council of Education, 1915

Article

The Significance and Role of Aesthetic Education in Schooling

Available from: SCIRP

Publication: Creative Education, vol. 5, no. 19

Pages: 1714-1719

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Abstract/Notes: Every child needs planned, aesthetic education in order to influence the experiencing, feeling and enjoying of beautiful things as a counterbalance to our currently rationalized world. Since the contemporary school strives for the development of professional knowledge and skills on the basis of intellectual actions, while (at the same time) neglecting other dimensions of the child’s personality (emotions, feelings, etc.), it is one of the most important tasks of the education of children and young people to develop the ability to enjoy art and beauty, and in one’s inner and outer life to act in accordance with a sense of proportion, harmony and beauty. The purpose of the article is to highlight the significance of aesthetic education in the development of the personality as a whole, to shed light on the aims of aesthetic education, to define the aesthetic dimension of experience and to ascertain the reasons for the neglect of aesthetic education in theory and practice.

Language: English

DOI: 10.4236/ce.2014.519190

ISSN: 2151-4755, 2151-4771

Article

Status of Early Childhood Education in Nepal

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: International Journal of Early Childhood, vol. 28, no. 2

Pages: 57-61

Asia, Early childhood education, Nepal, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: "...Primary education starts at the age ofsix in Nepal. Parents were not aware of the need of institutional education for their preschool children before the establishment of a Montessori School by the government for the first time in 1949. This school was based on the philosophy of the early childhood educationalist Madam Montessori. Since then the idea of early childhood education started to grow in the context ofNepal. With the establishment of a College of Education (Now Faculty of Education) in 1956, the Montessori School was merged into its Laboratory School. Thus, this Montessori School lost its separate identity and started to work as a downward extension of the Laboratory School of the college. Since then, this model as a downward extension of primary school was followed by the private and boarding schools..."

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/BF03174504

ISSN: 0020-7187, 1878-4658

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