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500 results

Article

On Research about Violent Kids and Child Care

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 13, no. 4

Pages: 8

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

Montessori Portended Recent Early Brain Research

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 13, no. 2

Pages: 1, 26

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

Teachers Research Network: August Session Is Opportunity for Teachers to Focus on Work

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 12, no. 4

Pages: 15

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

The Child-Adult Relationship and Educational Research

Available from: Internet Archive

Publication: New Era in Home and School, vol. 33, no. 6

Pages: 134-138

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Language: English

ISSN: 0028-5048

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Problem of 'the Problem with Educational Research'

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: AER: The Australian Educational Researcher, vol. 33, no. 2

Pages: 43–60

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Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/BF03216833

ISSN: 0311-6999, 2210-5328

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Melts in Your Mind, Not in Your Hand: Using Manipulatives to Teach Social Work Research

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Journal of Teaching in Social Work, vol. 20, no. 1-2

Pages: 159-169

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Abstract/Notes: Research and statistics are a vital part of the social work curriculum. However most social work students have difficulty grasping the basic concepts of these topics for a variety of reasons. Maria Montessori, the noted child psychologist and educator, is credited with formulating the concept of manipulatives: objects that can be used to concretize abstract processes in order to improve learning and retention. This article describes techniques for teaching the principles of hypothesis generation, sampling, statistical regression, and tests of significance (t-test and ANOVA) using small colored candies as manipulatives. Suggestions are provided for stimulating class discussions.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1300/J067v20n01_10

ISSN: 0884-1233

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Montessori Method: Some Recent Research

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: Interchange, vol. 2, no. 2

Pages: 41-59

Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc.

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Abstract/Notes: This paper on recent research with the Montessori method includes a brief review of this method for educating preschool-age children and criticisms leveled against it, and a review of comparative research studies in relation to several types of non-Montessori preschool programs with economically disadvantaged and middle-class populations. The comparative results are discussed in relation to three kinds of preschool experience: no schooling, traditional early childhoodoriented programs, and structured cognitive-oriented programs. The findings are interpreted in terms of Hunt's conceptual leel matching model.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/BF02137791

ISSN: 0826-4805, 1573-1790

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Let's Do More Than Look - Let's Research Montessori

Available from: JSTOR

Publication: Journal of Nursery Education, vol. 19, no. 1

Pages: 36-41

Americas, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, United States of America

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Language: English

ISSN: 2334-3982

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Second Language Corner for Children's House: A Practitioner–Researcher Journey Into Bilingualism in Montessori Education

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 7, no. 1

Pages: 67-82

Americas, Bilingualism, Central America, Latin America and the Caribbean, Mexico, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: This work reports, from a qualitative research perspective, the development of an English Corner project for a preschool Children’s House classroom in central Mexico over the course of a 3-year period. It shows the transition of a language specialist over six consecutive periods of work, from a traditional understanding and practice of teaching English as a second language to young learners into a more comprehensive one of the Montessori Method. The analysis of my own practice is used to recover insights through a reflective process with the intention to develop a second language (L2) Montessori program for 3- to 6-year-olds that aligns better with Montessori pedagogy.  Variables such as instruction time, setting, group constitution, materials, and teaching and learning strategies allowed for certain aspects to arise as leading points of interest for the focus of the analysis and the methodological and pedagogical adaptations that followed each period. This paper is an attempt to fill the gap between the need to deliver a second language effectively in Montessori education and the lack of guidance for doing it the Montessori way; it is especially for practitioners who do not have a Montessori background but also for Montessori-trained teachers for whom more specific preparation would aid their practice. I also hope to stimulate further research in the field of second language acquisition and multilingualism in Montessori education at every level of education.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v7i1.13401

ISSN: 2378-3923

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Designing a Logic Model to Inform Montessori Research

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 5, no. 1

Pages: 35-49

Montessori method of education - Research

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori education has a long history, but its recent growth in American public schools has led to increased interest in research efforts, particularly in exploring the potential of the Montessori experience to moderate the effects of poverty and in gathering data to evaluate public investment in Montessori schools. To assist research efforts, this paper introduces a comprehensive visual model, or logic model, that depicts the core components, underlying assumptions, and intended outcomes of the Montessori approach. Logic modeling, which results in a visual representation depicting the connections among a program’s inputs, primary activities, and outcomes, is often used in program planning and research to provide a common framework from which to work. Developed over a 3-year period by a collaborative group of experienced Montessori researchers and practitioners, the Logic Model for Montessori Education presented in this paper is a valuable tool for researchers with the potential to lay a foundation across disciplines for future research that is both rigorous and systematic in its measurement of Montessori processes and outcomes.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v5i1.9788

ISSN: 2378-3923

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