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Book

Hundert Jahre Montessori-Pädagogik, 1907-2007: Eine Chronik der Montessori-Pädagogik in der Schweiz [One Hundred Years of Montessori Education, 1907-2007: A Chronicle of Montessori Education in Switzerland]

Europe, Montessori method of education, Montessori movement, Montessori schools, Switzerland, Western Europe

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Abstract/Notes: Harold Baumann ordnet die schweizerische Montessori-Pädagogik in die internationale Reformpädagogik ein, skizziert ihre Anfänge im Kanton Tessin, zeigt die Auswirkungen und Einflüsse der Montessori-Bestrebungen in vielen Schweizer Kantonen, u.a. anhand der staatlichen Montessori-Kindergärten im Kanton Wallis. Zudem erläutert er den heutigen Stand der Montessori-Pädagogik in der Schweiz. Harold Baumann ergänzt seine Recherchen durch Beiträge, die ihm von Zeitzeugen überreicht wurden. [Harold Baumann classifies the Swiss Montessori pedagogy in the international reform pedagogy, outlines its beginnings in the canton of Ticino, shows the effects and influences of the Montessori endeavors in many Swiss cantons, e.g. with the help of the state Montessori kindergartens in the canton of Valais. He also explains the current state of Montessori education in Switzerland. Harold Baumann supplements his research with contributions that were presented to him by contemporary witnesses.]

Language: German

Published: Bern, Switzerland: Haupt Verlag, 2007

Edition: 1st edition

ISBN: 978-3-258-07092-6

Article

President Wilson's Daughter to Aid Mme. Montessori Show Her System

Available from: Library of Congress

Publication: The Sun (New York) (New York City, NY)

Pages: 6

Americas, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: The Montessori movement, considered by many a radical departure from traditional educational methods, will receive new emphasis and publicity from the fact that visitors to the Panama-Pacific International Exposition will see during the months of August, September, October and November not only a demonstration of the Montessori system but will see it conducted by the talented woman herself. Associated with her will be Miss Margaret Wilson, daughter of the President, Dr. David Starr Jordan, chancellor of Leland Stanford Junior University, and other well known educators. The Montessori method has been summed up as 'freedom for development of the child under best conditions disturbing as little as possible but helping buy every means this development.' Any estimate of Mme. Montessori's work to be of practical value will involve a comparison between the Montessori method and that of the kindergarten, since the kindergarten is the only system of organizes educational work for young children that has so far received general recognition. In the middle of the last century the sensitive woman soul and philosophic mind of Froebel grasped the fundamental principle of development and say that the first six or seven years are the most important in the life of the individual. After years of study he embodied what he conceived to be the fundamental principles of the education of little children in what is known as the kindergarten, and his ideas of the best means for the application of these principles in his kindergarten program, materials and devices. The discovery of the kindergarten marked a new era in the history of the educational world. Though suppressed for years by government authority in Germany, and received with much suspicion elsewhere, the kindergarten has become an integral part of the public school system of many cities and States in our country. Its introduction into England was championed by Charles Dickens, and in America it found an advocate in the philosopher and educator Dr. William T. Harris. Concerning the kindergarten and the Montessori methods, Dr. P. P. Claxton, United States Commissioner of Education says: 'Though aims and principles are the same for both Froebel and Montessori, their different methods of approach have resulted in difference in emphasis, program and decides. For those who see no further than the form there is apparent conflict. Many cannot understand that the work of both Froebel and Montessori must finally lose each its distinctive characteristics in the larger whole of a more perfect knowledge of the nature of infancy and the means of educating young children.' It must be said of Dr. Montessori that she is first, last and always scientific in her work. Prolonged training in the sciences that relate to human life, vitalized by practical experience in their application to defective children, gave her a method which is the outcome of genius, training and experience. She swung into prominence, against her wish, in the following way: While serving as assistant doctor at the psychiatric clinic of the University of Rome, Italy, she founder herself differing from her colleagues in that she felt, as she says, 'that mental deficiency presented chiefly a pedagogic rather than mainly a medical problem.' The expression of these views in an address brought Dr. Montessori prominently before the Minister of Public Instruction, and her work from this on assumed a public character. Her belief that the methods employed with deficient children 'contained educational principles more rational than those in use and that if applied to normal children they would develop or set free their personality in a marvelous and surprising way,' became her controlling idea, and is the very heart of the Montessori system. The system of Mme. Montessori is indissolubly joined with her famous 'didactic material.' Among this will be found small wooden frames to which are attached pieces of cloth or leather on which are buttons and buttonholes, hooks and eyes, eyelets and lacing cords, and strings to be tied and untied. There are also boxes of cylindrical insets and other simple devices to develop 'man's mystery over nature.' Mme. Montessori is her best interpreter when she says, 'We are inclined to believe that children are like puppets and we wash them and feed them as if they were dolls. We do not stop to think that the child that does not do does not know how to do. Our duty is that of helping him to make a conquest of such useful acts as nature intended he should perform for himself. The mother who feeds her child without making the least effort to teach him to hold the spoon for himself and to try to find his mouth with it is not a wise mother. She treats her son as though he were a doll. We call an individual disciplined when he is master of himself and can regulate his own conduct when it shall be necessary to follow some rule of life. If any educational act is to be efficacious it is necessary rigorously to avoid the arrest of spontaneous movements and the imposition of arbitrary tasks. It is of course understood here that we do not speak of a useless or dangerous act; this must be suppressed, destroyed.' The Montessori doctrine is therefore in substance that the child's inner self or personalit cannot rightfully develop unless free to express itself undirected and unguided by another person. As a consequence Dr. Montessori insists that each child be allowed bodily freedom and have as much unhampered liberty of action as possible in order that he may fully express his inner life in outer activity. The classic illustration by which Dr. Montessori puts in concrete form her doctrine is the following: 'One day the children had gathered in a circle about a basin of water containing some floating toys. A little boy 2 1/2 years old had been left outside the circle. He drew near to the other children and tried to force his way among them, but he was not strong enough to do this. The expression of thought on his face was intensely interesting. His eyes then lighted upon a little chair and he had evidently made up his mind to place it behind the group of children and climb on it. As he began to move toward the chair, his face illuminated with hope, a teacher seized him in her arms, lifted him above the heads of the other children, showed him the basin of water, saying, 'Come poor little one you shall see too.' The child seeing the floating toys did not experience the joy that he was about to feel through conquering the obstacles with his own force. The teacher hindered the child in this case from educating himself. The little fellow was about to feel himself a conqueror, and instead he found himself held within two imprisoning arms impotent.' The now famous 'House of the Children' in Rome, under the patronage of Queen Margherita, faithfully reflects and demonstrates the Montessori principles and methods. It has been described as an old orphan asylum, whose gray outer walls give no idea of the two beautiful and luxuriant courtyards within. These latter are filled with beds of blossoming plans, and the pillars of the inner porch are covered with clinging vines. The schoolroom in which the class for the children is held opens with wide double doors into one of these lovely courtyards, where the children play during hours in which they are not engaged in their Montessori exercises. Miss Elizabeth Harrison, president of the National Kindergarten Union says of this 'House of the Children': 'On my first visit I found the children busy getting out the 'didactic material' with which they were to employ themselves for the next hour and a quarter. Some came forward to shake hands with me; some merely smiled and nodded and did not interrupt their work. All seemed busy, happy and free. I afterward saw as many as eighty visitors in the room where there were only a dozen children, but none of the children were in the least disturbed by or seemingly conscious of the presence of the visitors. Most of the children came from nearby tenement houses, yet even the youngest of them washed their own hands and faces, put on clean, neat calico aprons and looked as fresh and clean as children from well cared for homes.' Comparing the kindergarten and the Montessori systems, the following differences appear: The kindergarten stresses group activities, while the Montessori system emphasized almost exclusively the development of the individual. The kindergartners say that education in coordinating of muscles, the special training of the child's senses and all such phases of individual development are expected to come in the nursery. The Montessori system has no place for stories; the kindergartners are famous for them. Mme. Montessori objects to stories for young children on the theory that all activities of the mind are derived from the outside world and are dependent on sense impressions, and that therefore the child should be kept within the realm of his own personal experience until he is at least 7 or 8 years old. It is not necessary to add that two __ meet at this point of difference. The most remarkable features of the Montessori system, as well as one of its decided points of divergence from the kindergarten, lies in its ___ of definite attitude on religious training. Froebel, trained in an environment where instruction in religion is practically nationwide, says that while the child unconsciously manifests teh divine impuse within him he must follow it with conscious insights persisting in what he knows to do right and must needs have definite training of this kind. Montessori, on the other hand, with nuns as her assistants and attendants in her 'House of the Children,' acknowledges the importance of religious training for little children, 'but confesses that as yet it is an unsolved problem to her.' Miss Harrison, who spent some time in Rome with Mme. Montessori says, 'She [Montessori] seems to feel that a child's spiritual nature will ___ aright if freedom is given ....

Language: English

Article

Türkiye’de Montessori Yöntemi ile İlgili Yapılan Çalışmaların İncelenmesi / Investigation of Studies on Montessori Method in Turkey

Available from: DergiPark Akademik

Publication: Yaşam Becerileri Psikoloji Dergisi / Life Skills Journal of Psychology, vol. 5, no. 10

Pages: 101-118

Asia, Literature reviews, Middle East, Turkey, Western Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori Yöntemi, bir eğitim sistemidir ve Maria Montessori tarafından oluşturulmuştur. Maria Montessori İtalyan bir pedagog ve ülkesinin ilk kadın doktorudur. Montessori sistemi çocuğu merkeze alır ve çocuğa görelik ilkesiyle hareket ederek, çocuğa uygun oluşturulmuş bir çevreye dayanır. Çocuğun ilgi alanları ve yetenekleri dikkate alınarak, bireysel öğrenme hızının olduğunu kabul eder ve bunu temel alan esnek bir eğitim süreci oluşturur. Montessori yöntemi bir sentezdir; çocukların içlerindeki potansiyeli fark edip keşfetmelerini ve karakterlerini oluşturmalarını amaçlar. Ayrıca çocuğun içindeki potansiyele ulaşması için düzenlenmiş bir alana ve özgürlüğe ihtiyacı olduğunu savunur. Ülkemizde Montessori konusu ile ilgili bilimsel çalışmalara önem verildiği ve çalışmalarının son yıllarda arttığı gözlemlenmektedir. Bu araştırmada, ülkemizde Montessori metodu ve uygulamaları ile ilgili, 2010-2021 yılları arasında yazılan tez ve makaleler, belirlenen ölçütlere göre incelenerek, hem bu metodun güvenilirlik ve geçerliliğini görmek hem de yapılacak yeni araştırmalara fikir vermek amaçlanmıştır. Bu çalışma nitel bir araştırma olup, amaçsal öğrenme stratejilerinden ölçüt öğrenme yöntemi ve doküman tarama (analizi) tekniği kullanılmıştır. Google Akademi, Dergipark ve Ulusal Tez Merkezi veri ortamlarından “montessori” kelimeleri ile kaynaklar taranmış ve 48 tez çalışması, 36 makale çalışması olmak üzere toplam da 84 çalışmaya ulaşılmıştır. Araştırmadan elde edilen bulgulara bakıldığında; ülkemizde Montessori metoduna yönelik çalışmalarının yoğunluğunun son 5 yıla ait olduğu saptanmıştır. Araştırmaların büyük bir bölümünün okul öncesi kademesinde yapıldığı söylenebilir. Yapılan çalışmaların tamamına yakınının sonuç bölümlerinde, Montessori yöntemi ile eğitim alan çocukların lehine değişim gözlendiği belirtilmiştir. / The Montessori Method is an education system and was created by Maria Montessori. Maria Montessori is an Italian pedagogue and the first female doctor in her country. The Montessori system puts the child in the center and, acting on the principle of relative to the child, is based on an environment created suitable for the child. Considering the interests and abilities of the child, it accepts the individual learning speed and creates a flexible education process based on this. The Montessori method is a synthesis; It aims for children to realize and discover the potential within them and to create their characters. He also argues that the child needs a regulated space and freedom to reach their potential. It is observed that scientific studies on the subject of Montessori are given importance in our country and their studies have increased in recent years. In this study, it is aimed to see the reliability and validity of this method and to give an idea for new researches by examining the theses and articles written between 2010-2021 about the Montessori method and its applications in our country, according to the determined criteria. This study is a qualitative research and criterion learning method and document scanning (analysis) technique, which are purposeful learning strategies, were used. Sources were scanned with the words "montessori" from Google Academy, Dergipark and National Thesis Center data environments, and a total of 84 studies, including 48 thesis studies and 36 article studies, were reached. Considering the findings obtained from the research; It has been determined that the intensity of the studies on the Montessori method in our country belongs to the last 5 years. It can be said that most of the studies were conducted at the preschool level. In the conclusion sections of almost all of the studies, it was stated that a change was observed in favor of the children who received education with the Montessori method.

Language: Turkish

DOI: 10.31461/ybpd.1026936

ISSN: 2587-1536

Article

I materiali sensoriali Montessori oltre le aule scolastiche / Los materiales sensoriales Montessori más allá del aula / Montessori sensorial materials beyond classrooms

Available from: Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

Publication: RELAdEI (Revista Latinoamericana de Educación Infantil), vol. 3, no. 3

Pages: 127-146

Autism in children, Children with disabilities, People with disabilities

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Abstract/Notes: Quest’articolo descrive due esperienze molto diverse effettuate in Italia. La prima riguarda l’introduzione di un laboratorio basato sull’uso dei materiali sensoriali Montessori all’Università dell’Immagine di Milano, fondata dal fotografo Fabrizio Ferri, che offriva a creativi di varia provenienza professionale e geografica una formazione post-secondaria biennale, organizzata incinque laboratori, ciascuno dedicato a uno dei cinque sensi, condotto da un docente responsabile. Quello da me condotto aveva il titolo: “Angolo del ristoro sensoriale” ed era trasversale agli altri cinque. La seconda riguarda invece l’utilizzazione di incastri solidi, torre rosa e scala marrone, nel percorso rieducativo di una ragazza di vent’anni, affetta da grave ritardo mentale con tratti autistici. In entrambi i casi i risultati sono stati molto positivi. Nel primo, la percezione sensoriale degli studenti dell’Università dell’Immagine, si è raffinata e perfezionata.Nel secondo, il caso di ritardo mentale con tratti autistici, ha suscitato nella ragazza un interesse che si è esteso all’ambiente esterno e alle persone che interagivano con lei. Ha inoltre migliorato la manualità fine, rendendo più efficaci le indicazioni per svolgere correttamente le mansioni della vita quotidiana nella propria casa, in cui in precedenza aveva scarsissima autonomia. Con lei il percorso Montessori è iniziato in uno studio di musicoterapia e ha interagito con quelle sedute, per proseguire poi a casa sua, con varie attività di vita pratica, volte a migliorare il coordinamento del corpo nello spazio, il coordinamento oculomanuale, i movimenti raffinati delle dita e la discriminazione visiva. Queste attività hanno fatto progredire molto la sua autonomia. / En este trabajo se describen dos experiencias llevadas a cabo en Italia: la introducción de un laboratorio para el uso de los materiales sensoriales Montessori en la Universidad de la Imagen de Milán (UI) que ofrecía a los “creativos” de diversas procedencias profesionales y geográficas la formación postsecundaria según un programa experimental de dos años, organizado en cinco laboratorios, cada uno dedicado a uno de los cinco sentidos. El que yo dirigí se titulaba “Rincón de descanso sensorial” y fue trasversal a los otros cinco. Se denominaba: “Rincón de descanso sensorial” y fue transversal a los otros cinco. El segundo se refiere al uso de encajes sólidos, torre rosa y escalera marrón, en la rehabilitación de una chica de veintiún años, que sufría un retraso mental severo con rasgos autistas. En ambos casos los resultados fueron muy positivos: las percepciones sensoriales de los estudiantes de la UI se han afinado y perfeccionado; la introducción de los materiales en la rehabilitación sensorial de la chica ha despertado un interés que se ha extendido al entorno externo y a las personas que interactuaban con ella. También ha mejorado los movimientos finos de los dedos, lo cual le facilita llevar a cabo las tareas de la vida cotidiana, en la que antes tenían muy poca autonomía. Con ella el proceso Montessori comenzó en un estudio de musicoterapia, para seguir a continuación en su casa, con varias actividades de la vida práctica, para mejorar la coordinación del cuerpo en el espacio, la coordinación óculo-manual, la motricidad de los dedos y la discriminación visual. Estas actividades han mejorado su autonomía. / This paper deals with two different experiences carried out in Italy. The first concerns a Sensorial Materials workshop, which I directed in Milano at the University of Image (UI) founded by photographer Fabrizio Ferri. UI offered a post-secondary education to creative professionals, from various backgrounds and geographical areas, according to a two-year experimental program, organized in five workshops, each of them dedicated to one of the five senses and directed by a professional of the field. My workshop title was: “The corner of sensory relief” and interacted with the other five. The second relates to the use of solid insets, pink tower and brown stairs for the rehabilitation of a twenty-one years-old girl, who suffered from severe mental retardation with some autistic features. In both cases the results were very positive. In the first one, the sensory perceptions of UI students have been refined and perfected; in the second, the girl affected by mental retardation showed a great interest in the above-quoted materials. The girl has spread her interest to external environment and to the people who interacted with her. The fine movements of her fingers were also enhanced, allowing her to perform various tasks in her daily life, which previously she was unable to carry out. Her Montessori rehabilitation began during some music therapy sessions. Then it was carried out at home, where various Practical life activities were introduced. Thanks to them she improved her body coordination in space, her eye-hand coordination and visual discrimination. These activities strengthen considerably her autonomy

Language: Italian

ISSN: 2255-0666

Article

Implementasi Prinsip-prinsip Montessori dalam Pembelajaran AUD [Implementation of Montessori Principles in AUD Pembelajaran Learning]

Available from: Universitas Islam Negeri Sunan Kalijaga (Indonesia)

Publication: Golden Age: Jurnal Ilmiah Tumbuh Kembang Anak Usia Dini [Golden Age: Scientific Journal of Early Childhood Development], vol. 3, no. 2

Pages: 91-102

Asia, Australasia, Indonesia, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Southeast Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui bagaimana implementasi prinsip-prinsip Montessori dalam pembelajaran,  Apa saja faktor pendukung dan penghambat implementasi prinsip Montessori dalam pembelajaran, Dampak menggunakan prinsip Montessori dalam pembelajaran terhadap perkembangan anak di Kelompok Bermain (KB) Safa Islamic Preschool Yogyakarta. Jenis penelitian adalah penelitian kualitatif yang bersifat diskriptif. Subjek penelitian adalah pemilik KB, kepala KB, guru KB dan anak-anak KB Safa Islamic Preschool Yogyakarta. Obyek penelitian ini adalah pembelajaran prinsip Montessori di KB Safa Islamic Preschool Yogyakarta. Pengumpulan data menggunakan teknik wawancara, observasi, dan dokumentasi. Analisis data dilakukan dengan cara reduksi data, display data, dan penarikan kesimpulan. Teknik penilaian keabsahan data menggunakan triangulasi teknik dan sumber. Hasil penelitian ini menunjukkan bahwa Pertama, Implementasi pembelajaran berbasis prinsip Montessori melalui lima area model pembelajaran Montessori yaitu area sensorial, area matematika, area ilmu pengetahuan dan kebudayaan, area bahasa dan area keterampilan hidup yang berjalan dengan sistem penggabungan lintas usia disetiap kelompoknya. Kedua, Faktor pendukung dan penghambat, faktor yang mendukung di antaranya perencanaan dengan konselor pendidikan Montessori, pendidikan dan pelatihan Montessori, seluruh guru inti adalah sarjana. Faktor yang menghambat yaitu keterbatasan media pembelajaran, terjadinya pergantian guru, kurangnya pemahaman wali murid mengenai pembelajaran lintas usia. Ketiga, Dampak prinsip Montessori terhadap perkembangan anak adalah menjadi mandiri, kritris dan perkembangan sosial yang meningkat. [This study aims to find out how to implement Montessori principles in learning, what are the supporting and inhibiting factors for implementing Montessori principles in learning, the impact of using Montessori principles in learning on child development in the Safa Islamic Preschool Playgroup (KB) Yogyakarta. This type of research is descriptive qualitative research. The research subjects were family planning owners, family planning heads, family planning teachers and family planning children at Safa Islamic Preschool Yogyakarta. The object of this research is the learning of Montessori principles at KB Safa Islamic Preschool Yogyakarta. Collecting data using interview, observation, and documentation techniques. Data analysis was carried out by means of data reduction, data display, and drawing conclusions. The technique of assessing the validity of the data uses triangulation of techniques and sources. The results of this study indicate that first, the implementation of Montessori principle-based learning through five areas of the Montessori learning model, namely the sensorial area, the mathematics area, the science and culture area, the language area and the life skills area which runs with a cross-age system in each group. Second, the supporting and inhibiting factors, the supporting factors include planning with a Montessori education counselor, Montessori education and training, all core teachers are undergraduates. The inhibiting factors are the limitations of learning media, the occurrence of teacher changes, the lack of understanding of students' parents regarding cross-age learning. Third, the impact of the Montessori principle on children's development is to become independent, critical and increase social development.]

Language: Indonesian

DOI: 10.14421/jga.2018.32-03

ISSN: 2502-3519

Thesis

La aplicación del método Montessori para el desarrollo integral en el aula de 3 años, de la Institución Montessori School - Arequipa, 2021 [The Application of the Montessori Method for Integral Development in the Classroom of 3 years, of the Montessori School Institution - Arequipa, 2021]

Available from: Universidad César Vallejo - Institutional Repository

Americas, Child development, Classroom environment, Latin America and the Caribbean, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Peru, Prepared environment, South America

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Abstract/Notes: El presente trabajo de suficiencia profesional tiene como título: “La Aplicación del Método Montessori para el Desarrollo Integral en el Aula de 3 años, de la Institución Montessori School - Arequipa, 2021”. Además, el objetivo general es: Explicar la importancia de la aplicación del Método Montessori para el desarrollo integral de los niños de 3 años, de la Institución Educativa Montessori School – Arequipa, 2021. Está dividido en 4 capítulos; en el capítulo I se aborda la realidad educativa; en el capítulo II se plantean los antecedentes y bases teóricas; el capítulo III está referido al árbol de problemas y actividades y finalmente en el capítulo IV, se encuentran las conclusiones y recomendaciones. De acuerdo con las revisiones teóricas, el Método Montessori, es una educación que permite que los niños de la primera infancia se desarrollen de manera integral, teniendo en cuenta que esta filosofía se basa en el desarrollo natural de las personas, creando un ambiente propicio (ambiente preparado) que satisfaga los períodos sensibles, las tendencias humanas y aprovechando el primer plano de desarrollo que está caracterizado por la mente absorbente. Además, dándole vital importancia a la preparación emocional, física y psicológica del maestro. [The present work of professional sufficiency has as title: "The Application of the Montessori Method for Integral Development in the Classroom of 3 years, of the Montessori School Institution - Arequipa, 2021". In addition, the general objective is: Explain the importance of the application of the Montessori Method for the integral development of 3-year-old children, of the Montessori School Educational Institution - Arequipa, 2021. It is divided into 4 chapters; Chapter I addresses the educational reality; in chapter II the antecedents and theoretical bases are raised; Chapter III refers to the tree of problems and activities and finally Chapter IV contains the conclusions and recommendations. According to theoretical reviews, the Montessori Method is an education that allows early childhood children to develop in an integral way, taking into account that this philosophy is based on the natural development of people, creating a conducive environment ( prepared environment) that satisfies sensitive periods, human tendencies and taking advantage of the first plane of development that is characterized by the absorbing mind. In addition, giving vital importance to the emotional, physical and psychological preparation of the teacher.]

Language: Spanish

Published: Lima, Peru, 2021

Book Section

Montessori-Geist und Montessori-Praxis in der Schule [Montessori Spirit and Montessori Practice in School]

Book Title: Montessori-Unterricht: Aus dem Montessori-Heft der Neuen Erziehung [Montessori lessons From the Montessori booklet of the New Education]

Pages: 7-21

Maria Montessori - Speeches, addresses, etc., Montessori training courses, Trainings

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Language: German

Published: Berlin, Germany: Hensel and Co. Verlag, 1926

Article

Their Priorities Are in Order [Priority Montessori Materials]

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 8, no. 3

Pages: 10

Public Montessori

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Language: English

Doctoral Dissertation

Seriation Skills in Three Year-Old Children: A Training Study Using Montessori Materials

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Language: English

Published: Houston, Texas, 1978

Article

Pamela Rigg: Cosmic Vision and an Eye for Detail [Montessori Materials Research Foundation]

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 10, no. 2

Pages: 16-17

Public Montessori

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Language: English

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