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977 results

Article

The Effect of the Montessori Education Method on Pre-School Children’s Social Competence, Behaviour and Emotion Regulation Skills

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Early Child Development and Care, vol. 189, no. 9

Pages: 1-15

Asia, Efficacy, Middle East, Turkey, Preschool children, Social development, Social emotional learning, Turkey, Western Asia

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Abstract/Notes: This research aims to investigate the effect of Montessori method on social competence and behaviors of 3.5–5 years-old-children on their emotion regulation skills. Sequential Explanatory Design, one of the mixed method designs, was used in the study. The study group of the research consisted of 55 children attending two independent preschools in Eskişehir. Personal Information Form, Social Competence and Behavior Evaluation Inventory-Teacher and Parent Forms, Emotion Regulation Checklist and Parent Interview Forms for the Evaluation of Montessori Method have been used to collect the data. Friedman test used for data analysis. Post-hoc analysis with Wilcoxon signed-rank test and MannWhitney U were conducted to reveal the source of differentiation between the scores. It was determined that significant differences between Social Competence – Behavior and Emotion Regulation Skills sub-scale pretest and posttest mean scores of children in the study group. There are significant differences between the posttest scores of study and control groups.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/03004430.2017.1392943

ISSN: 0300-4430, 1476-8275

Article

Anti-Asian Racism: "It Doesn't Feel 'Random' to Me"

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 34, no. 3

Pages: 26-29

Anti-racism, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Effectiveness of Montessori-Based Activities on Agitation Among Asian Patients with Dementia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Available from: PubMed

Publication: Medicine (Baltimore), vol. 101, no. 32

Pages: e29847

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: OBJECTIVES: Montessori based activity are supposed to be an effective nonpharmacological intervention in the treatment of agitation in western countries. However, most studies conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of Montessori based activities on agitation in Asian patients were small sample size, as well as inconsistent outcomes, which may limit the reliability of the conclusions. The present pooled analysis, hence, was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the activity on agitation related with dementia in Asian patients with dementia. DESIGN: Prospective randomized clinical studies were included, of which available data was extracted. Outcomes of physical aggressive behaviors, physical nonaggressive behaviors, and verbal aggressive behaviors were pooled for the analysis by weighted mean differences. DATA SOURCES: Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), WanFang, and China Science and Technology Journal Database (VIP). ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA: Prospective, randomized, controlled clinical studies, conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the activity on agitation related with dementia in Asian patients with dementia. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS: Available data including baseline characteristics and interested outcomes from the included literature were extracted independently by 2 investigators. Measuring scales including CMAI and NOSIE were adopted for the efficacy comparison between Montessori based activity and standard activity. Weighted mean difference was used for the pooled analysis. RESULTS: A total of 460 participants were included in the present meta-analysis. The pooled mean difference agitation for Montessori based activity was -3.86 (95% CI: -7.38 to -0.34, P = 0.03) comparing to standard activity. The pooled mean differences for physical aggressive behaviors, physical nonaggressive behaviors, and verbal aggressive behaviors in Montessori based activity group were -0.82 (95% CI: -1.10 to -0.55; P < 0.00001), -0.81 (95% CI: -1.68 to 0.55; P = 0.07), and 0.38 (95% CI: -0.92 to 1.68; P = 0.57). CONCLUSIONS: Montessori based activities may reduce the frequency of agitation, especially in physical aggressive behaviors comparing to standard activities in Asian patients with dementia. However, the effectiveness of Montessori based activities on reduction of subcategorized agitated behaviors including physical nonaggressive behaviors, and verbal aggressive behaviors may not be reliable as physical aggressive behaviors.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1097/MD.0000000000029847

ISSN: 1536-5964

Article

International News

Publication: Montessori Courier, vol. 1, no. 4

Pages: 18

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Language: English

ISSN: 0959-4108

Article

Integral Education in Ancient India from Vedas and Upanishads to Vedanta

Available from: Zenodo

Publication: International Journal of Research - Granthaalayah, vol. 6, no. 6

Pages: 281-295

Asia, India, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Western scholarship usually ignores the contributions from other civilizations, India for instance. At the same time, contemporary India seems to have forgotten to some extent the deepest achievements of its own tradition. Moreover, modern culture has often produced some kind of despise against ancient traditions as opposed to the freedom and emancipation of the modern world. This paper tries to unveil all the depth and beauty of Indian philosophy of education, especially through major traditions such as Vedas, Upanishads and Vedanta. It also tries to show that the pedagogic message of the sages of modern India revives all the depth of the ancient tradition. This long history of holistic education in India through 35 centuries may enrich the Western insights with figures such as Steiner, Montessori or Dewey, aware that intercultural dialogue will be one of the major challenges of the XXIst century. It becomes crystal clear through this paper that the vision of integral education in Indian culture was inseparable from the spiritual/ mystical dimension, or to put in reverse terms, the spiritual domain constituted the very foundation of the educational process in Indian philosophy of education, a fundamental point that would be again emphasized by Indian modern philosophers such as Vivekananda, Aurobindo and even Krishnamurti.

Language: English

DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.1308951

ISSN: 2394-3629, 2350-0530

Article

The Effect of Montessori Method on Cognitive Tempo of Kindergarten Children

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Early Child Development and Care, vol. 188, no. 3

Pages: 327-335

Asia, Cognitive development, Middle East, Western Asia, Turkey, Western Asia

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Abstract/Notes: This study was undertaken to discover the effect of the Montessori Method on the cognitive tempo of 4–5-year-old children. Using an experimental pre-test–post-test paired control group design, the study sample included 60 children attending İhsan Doğramacı Applied Nursery School (affiliated to Selcuk University, Department of Health Sciences) in Konya during the 2015–2016 education year. The data of the study were collected using Kansas Reflection-Impulsivity Scale for Preschool – Form A. The tests were administered to children before and after the treatment and a follow-up test was administered to the treatment group six weeks following the completion of the treatment. The statistical analyses of the research data were done using Mann–Whitney U test and Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test. The results of the study indicated that the Montessori Method decreases the number of errors and extends the reflection time among the preschool children in the treatment group.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/03004430.2016.1217849

ISSN: 0300-4430, 1476-8275

Archival Material Or Collection

E. M. Standing Collection on the Montessori Method, 1895-1980

Available from: Seattle University Library

Asia, Edwin Mortimer Standing - Biographic sources, Edwin Mortimer Standing - Writings, India, Montessori method of education, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Edwin Mortimer Standing (1887-1967) was the primary compiler of this collection that became the basis for the Montessori Teacher Training Program at Seattle University from 1968 to 1986. William J. Codd, SJ was the first director of the program. The collection contains correspondence, lecture notes, manuscripts, essays, speech texts, photographs, files, clippings, ephemera, sound recordings and publications. Materials document the educational philosophy of Maria Montessori as seen through the writings and correspondence of E.M. Standing and reflect the growing interest in Maria Montessori's teachings and pedagogy from Europe and South Asia to the United States in the 1920s. Also documented is the historical development and establishment of Montessori-based schools and teacher training programs in Seattle, WA and the greater Pacific Northwest and western United States. The collection includes early administrative records and correspondence pertaining to the formation of Seattle University's Montessori Teacher Training Program. The bulk of the materials in this collection are from circa 1939 to 1970. The collection is primarily in English, with some material in Italian, French, Spanish, and Latin. The folder numbering sequence shown in the finding aid is not reproduced on the folders themselves. Series I: Correspondence - Includes incoming and outgoing general and subject correspondence primarily between Edwin Mortimer Standing (circa 1919-1967) and William J. Codd, S.J. (circa 1958-1980) and encompassing a wide variety of friends and associates. Correspondents include Mario Montessori (Maria's son), A.M. Joosten, Phyllis Wallbank, and Lady Carmen Bazely. Other correspondence relates to issues involving publishing royalty, reprint and citations between E.M. Standing, Fr. Codd (Standing’s literary executor) and various publishers. A portion of corrrespondence is between Mr. Standing and Donald Demarest, Academy Guild Press publisher (circa 1959-1962). The correspondence within this series is arranged chronologically by year. Series II: Literary Productions - Includes notes, drafts, essays, plays, poems and manuscripts primarily written by Standing. The series contains manuscript drafts of various religious and educational essays and draft chapters from two of Standing’s books, The Montessori Method and The Child in The Church. Also included within this series is Indian Twilight which is an unpublished 4-volume chronicle of Standing’s years as a Montessori tutor for the Saharabai family in India (circa 1920-1925). Included are reprints of Standing’s letters documenting his experiences, photographs of the people and architecture of India before its independence from England; and brief references to conversations with Mahatma Gandhi who was a close friend and neighbor of the Saharabai family. The items within this series are arranged by sub-series, by author and in chronological order. Series III: Lecture Transcripts - Includes transcripts of speeches given by Maria Montessori in London prior to World War Two. Documents are in Italian and English and are arranged chronologically as well as by lecturer. Series IV: Subject Files - Includes transcripts of speeches given by Maria Montessori in London prior to World War Two. Documents are in Italian and English and are arranged chronologically as well as by lecturer. Series V: Legal and Financial Documents - Documents within this series include publisher contracts, royalty statements, insurance policies, Standing’s will and passport Series VI: Datebooks and Address Books; Series VII: Article and Clipping Files - Includes copies of published articles written by Standing, Fr. Codd and their associates as well as news clippings of interest to Standing and Fr. Codd. Series VIII: Photographic Material - This series includes black and white original photographs of Maria Montessori and classroom activity in early Montessori schools. Also included in this series are early glass plate negatives depicting Montessori school scenes. The bulk of the materials within this series are uncredited and undated. Series IX: Religious, Instructional and General Ephemera; Series X: Sound Recordings; Series XI: Educational Pamphlets and Monographic Materials

Language: English, Italian, French, Spanish, Latin

Extent: 19.5 linear feet, (18 boxes and 1 oversized box)

Archive: Seattle University, Lemieux Library and McGoldrick Learning Commons, Special Collections (Seattle, Washington)

Book Section

Maria Montessori en Inde: Adoption et Adaptation d’une Méthode Pédagogique [Maria Montessori in India: Adoption and Adaptation of a Pedagogic Method]

Available from: OpenEdition Books

Book Title: L’Inde et l’Italie: Rencontres intellectuelles, politiques et artistiques [India and Italy: Intellectual, political and artistic encounters]

Pages: 245-285

Asia, India, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: In this article I focus on the impact of the Maria Montessori’s pedagogical method during the years of her work in South Asia (1939-1946; 1947-1949). The genesis of this research started in the late 1980s during the years of my fieldwork in Madras (today Chennai), when I was amazed to find a large number of “Montessori” schools in that city. Certainly, they were many more than in Italy, and in Rome itself, where Maria Montessori founded the first “House of Children” on the 6th January 1907. Thus, out of mere curiosity I started to enquire about the reasons of such “implantation”. Soon I came to know that Maria Montessori (1870-1952) and her son, Mario Montesano Montessori (1898-1982), from 1939 till 1949, spent almost ten years in India, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. In all those countries they collaborated and interacted with local pedagogists, by also training hundreds of children and more than thousand students and teachers to the homonimous “Montessori” pedagogical method. India, after Italy, was also the country where Maria Montessori spent the longest period of her life. After relating to the major events of her personal life as well as her scientific and social engagements as psychiatrist, pedagogist, outspoken feminist and antifascist, I deal here with the adoption and adaptation of her pedagogical method in South Asia. Finally, I tackle the influence of the local educational systems and cultural practices on Maria Montessori herself and on her own method’s further development. Due to such a synergic encouter and interaction, today India is one of the most dynamic and prestigeous international centers for the “Montessori” pedagogical method teachers’ training.,Dans cet article, j’étudie en particulier l’impact de la méthode pédagogique de Maria Montessori durant ses années en Asie du Sud (1939-1946, 1947-1949). La genèse de cette recherche a débuté à la fin des années 1980, quand j’ai été étonnée de trouver à Madras (Chennai) un si grand nombre d’écoles Montessori au cours de mon long terrain dans cette ville. Certes, elles étaient beaucoup plus nombreuses que celles présentes en Italie, et plus qu’à Rome même, où Maria Montessori fonda la première Maison des Enfants le 6 janvier 1907. Ainsi, par simple curiosité, je commençai à m’enquérir des raisons d’une telle « implantation ». Bientôt, j’ai réalisé que Maria Montessori (1870-1952) et son fils, Mario Montesano Montessori (1898-1982), avaient de 1939 à 1949, séjourné près de dix ans en Inde, au Pakistan et au Sri Lanka. Dans tous ces pays, ils ont collaboré et interagi avec les pédagogues locaux, en formant également des centaines d’enfants et plus de mille élèves et enseignants à la méthode pédagogique « Montessori ». L’Inde, après l’Italie, était aussi le pays où Maria Montessori a passé la plus longue période de sa vie. Après avoir évoqué les grands événements de sa vie personnelle ainsi que ses engagements scientifiques et sociaux en tant que psychiatre, pédagogue, féministe et antifasciste, je traite ici de l’adoption et de l’adaptation de sa méthode pédagogique en Asie du Sud. Enfin, j’analyse l’influence des systèmes éducatifs locaux et des pratiques culturelles sur Maria Montessori elle-même et sur le développement ultérieur de sa propre méthode. Grâce à cette rencontre et à cette interaction synergiques, l’Inde est aujourd’hui l’un des centres internationaux les plus dynamiques et les plus prestigieux pratiquant la méthode pédagogique Montessori.

Language: French

Published: Paris, France: OpenEdition Books, 2018

ISBN: 978-2-7132-3154-4

Series: Purushartha

Book Section

Love: An Essential Need

Book Title: Creative Development in the Child: The Montessori Approach

Pages: 224-228

Asia, Child development, India, South Asia, Maria Montessori - Writings, South Asia, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Maria Montessori lectured in Italian during the first International Montessori Course in 1939 at Madras, India. These 75 lectures were translated into English by her son Mario, as she spoke. And were taken down near verbatim in short hand, transcribed and set into galleys overnight. One such set of proofs forms the original manuscript for this book. For the most part, each chapter in this book encompasses a single lecture. The lectures are left in the same order as they were given, swinging between psychology and the use of the materials. India’s diversity of language, social custom and religious practice enriched her research. During this time, Dr. Montessori worked with children in Madras and put into practice her theories of adapting the environment, furniture and the Practical Life materials to local conditions. In these lectures, Maria Montessori speaks with the mature wisdom of a lifetime spent studying, not just early childhood, but human development as a whole and gives a complete, wonderful and colorful overview of her pedagogy and philosophy.

Language: English

Published: Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Montessori-Pierson Publishing Company, 2020

ISBN: 978-90-79506-52-1

Series: The Montessori Series , 24

Article

Place of Art and Handwork in the Montessori System

Available from: HathiTrust

Publication: Proceedings of Meeting [Western Drawing and Manual Training Association, Des Moines, Iowa, May 7-10, 1913], vol. 20

Pages: 89-96

Americas, Art, Montessori method of education, North America, United States of America, Western Drawing and Manual Training Association

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Abstract/Notes: A report presented at the 20th annual meeting of the Western Drawing and Manual Training Association, Des Moines, Iowa, May 7-10, 1913.

Language: English

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