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Doctoral Dissertation

Assessment Practices Used by Montessori Teachers of Kindergarten Through Sixth Grade Students in the United States

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

Americas, Assessment, Montessori method of education - Teachers, Teachers, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This research explored student evaluation practices used by Montessori elementary teachers. The Montessori teaching method emphasized students learning at their own pace within a prepared environment where the teacher's role was somewhat different compared to traditional classroom settings. Both traditional and alternative methods of student assessment were utilized by Montessori teachers (e.g., anecdotal records, informal conferences with students, observation of students, one-to-one interview with students, checklists of lessons, demonstration of skill mastery, and standardized achievement tests). The methodology and reasoning behind student evaluation was not well understood by the educational community, and today's dynamic cultural environment demands better attention to this subject. Following a literature review of assessment practices, analysis consisted of sampling member schools of the American Montessori Society (AMS). A questionnaire was submitted to 241 eligible AMS member schools with elementary programs across the United States, and 108 responses (representing 30% of the eligible schools) were collected. The questionnaire's items (27 total questions) were refined to 16 research questions which were analyzed using both quantitative and qualitative methods. A number of results were produced. The two most prominent were: Montessori elementary teachers used more alternative than traditional methods of assessment practices; and, the factors that influenced the assessment practices used by Montessori teachers were the make up (student:teacher ratio, individual student's needs, multi-aged range) of students in the classroom and the Montessori method of education. Other results of this study included: Montessori schools used standardized achievement tests but individual respondents were not convinced they fit the Montessori method of teaching; and, the combination of non-graded report cards, anecdotal records, and student portfolios were successful reporting practices for parent teacher conference. The study concluded with identifying several areas of assessment practice where future research and professional development may benefit Montessori administrators, teachers, students, and parents.

Language: English

Published: Memphis, Tennessee, 1999

Article

Deep Ecology: Educational Possibilities for the Twenty-First Century

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 38, no. 1

Pages: 201-216

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Fritjof Capra's two-part lecture presents the fundamentals of systems thinking and sustainability along with the power of an ecologically comprehensive theory to shape education to fit the needs of human development in relation to the environment. Dr. Capra aims for the big picture emphasizing that effective learning is a system embedded in the web of life, which is yet another system. It gives us the ability to see the interconnectedness of the environment, of the community, of the natural world all at once--"a network of phenomena that are fundamentally interconnected." Capra maintains that systems theory, including systems learning, is a new way of seeing the world as living connections in which humans are playing their part in finding a real sense of belonging by working in direct contact with the natural world and all of its facets. [Reprinted from "The NAMTA Journal" 28,1 (2003, Winter): 157-193. This talk was a keynote address at the NAMTA conference titled "Montessori Education for Human Development: The Child in the Natural World," in Chicago, IL, October 31-November 3, 2002.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Helping Children Navigate Global Tragedy

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 30, no. 1

Pages: 36-39

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Because we experience the trauma of global tragedy in a much more immediate and unfiltered way than we used to, it is more difficult for us to shield ourselves and our children from the barrage of sensationalized and politicized images flooding our environment. To achieve this, I looked for articles that: * were Montessori-compatible in that they had at their center the experience of the child, aligned with our understanding of the planes of development, and spoke to the human tendencies toward orientation, gregariousness, order, communication, exploration, and self-perfection; * were parent-friendly in that they were easy to read and digest, offered practical advice, and did not put added pressure on parents to be more perfect or blame parents for not being able to control children's media exposure; * were accurate from a child development and psychology perspective, and offered a realistic view of how media are produced and disseminated; * came from sources that are reasonably reputable and proactive in their management of other social issues; * put the onus on the adult, not the child, to create an environment in which resilience can be developed (in essence, furthering the spiritual preparation of the teacher). "According to the UN, young people, including children, are the largest group of people affected by disasters across the world. " "Talking to Children about Violence: Tips for Parents and Teachers," by the National Association of School Psychologists (bit.ly/2rFWIsK) This article presents 7 tips to support children in dealing with the aftermath of violent events, along with a list of talking points to use that will reassure children while maintaining a realistic outlook.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Communication Board as a Montessori Apparatus in Teaching Mathematics to Autism Students

Available from: Ukrainian Journal of Educational Studies and Information Technology

Publication: Ukrainian Journal of Educational Studies and Information Technology, vol. 7, no. 3

Pages: 25-31

Asia, Australasia, Autism in children, Europe, Indonesia, Mathematics education, Montessori materials, People with disabilities, Southeast Asia

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Abstract/Notes: The research of mathematics teachers and instructors is still focused on normal students. Students with special needs are often ruled out. In fact, they also need to learn mathematics. Mathematics is a very basic subject and must be mastered by everyone, including students with special needs. This research is intended to apply mathematics learning to autism students by using communication boards as a Montessori apparatus. Communication is chosen because autistic students have a visual learning style. Furthermore, the learning method is done with Montessori because it takes the concept of learning with the environment, in accordance with the main purpose of learning for autism students to be able to live independently and be empowered in the community. The study used the descriptive qualitative method. According to the research results several Montessori apparatuses have been chosen used including visual schedules, visuals to structure the environment, visual scripts, a visual rule reminder, the visual task analysis, and a choice board.

Language: English

DOI: 10.32919/uesit.2019.03.03

ISSN: 2521-1234

Book

The Relevance of Montessori Today: Meeting Human Needs-Principles to Practice: Proceeding of the AMI/USA National Conference, Bellevue, Washington, July 25-26, 1996

Available from: ERIC

AMI/USA National Conference (Bellevue, Washington, 25-26 July 1996), Americas, North America, United States of America, Upper elementary

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Abstract/Notes: This set of proceedings from the Association Montessori International (AMI/USA) 1996 conference contains the conference schedule and 20 presentations. The conference presentations are: (1) "The Dawning of Wisdom" (Montessori); (2) "The Support of Montessori Education to Human Potential" (Montanaro); (3) "Healthy Environment: Healthy Children: Healthy Culture" (Orion); (4) "Cosmic Education vs. the Public School Curriculum--Are the Two at Variance?" (Stephenson); (5) "The Atrium: Silence, Simplicity, Movement, Symbol and Joy" (Kaiel); (6) "Family Star--A Montessori Grassroots Early Headstart Initiative" (Urioste); (7) "Beyond the Basic Needs: Nurturing the Full Potential of the Upper Elementary Child" (Denton); (8) "Building the Elementary Program and Transitional Program Strategies" (Davidson); (9) "Practical Applications of Montessori in the Home" (Helfrich); (10) "An Approach to the Resolution of Conflicts in a Positive Way" (Dubovoy); (11) "Talking with Parents: Conferences and Communications" (Caudill); (12) "Dr. Maria Montessori--A Contemporary Educator?" (Stephenson); (13) "The Relevance of the 'Erdkinder' Vision" (Davis); (14) "Maria Montessori Envisioned Physics as Part of the Environment" (Gebhardt-Seele); (15) "Montessori Research: Recent Trends" (Boehnlein); (16) "Children at Risk" (Richardson); (17) "The Child in the Family" (Fernando); (18) "Working with Your Assistant" (Helfrich); (19) "Montessori in the 21st Century" (Lillard); and (20) "Classroom Management--The Path to Normalization" (Pritzker).

Language: English

Published: New York: American Montessori Internationale of the United States (AMI/USA), 1997

Article

Judaism and Montessori

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 23, no. 4

Pages: 22-25

Judaism, Montessori method of education, Religious education

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Abstract/Notes: Judaism, as a religion and a culture, places a high value on education and scholarly pursuits. As Jewish schools of varying affiliations and denominations look for ways to improve and revive programming, some are exploring the Montessori method. Based on education that follows the child, Montessori focuses on respect, independence, and preparing an environment that nurtures a child's natural desire for discovery. Jewish schools and Jewish parents are finding that Montessori meshes well with core principles of Jewish faith and culture, such as care for the environment, self-sufficiency, independence, and justice. Despite its devotion to spiritual pursuits, Montessori education does not endorse or espouse any specific religious beliefs, focusing instead on universal values. As a scientist, educator, and spiritualist, Dr. Montessori understood that there was a place for religion within education, giving children the spiritual knowledge and cultural framework to function within society. The growth of Jewish Montessori education stands to benefit both Jewish schools and the secular Montessori community, as both share the goal of developing capable, confident, and spiritually awakened children.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

The Organization of Intellectual Work in School

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 20, no. 3

Pages: 21-28

Classroom environment, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Maria Montessori - Speeches, addresses, etc., Maria Montessori - Writings, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Prepared environment, Teacher-student relationships

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Abstract/Notes: This reprint of a 1915 conference paper discusses the role of preschool teachers in observing and analyzing their students' work under the Montessori method of child-centered, individualized, early-childhood education. It examines children's work cycle over the course of the day and the teachers' role in organizing intellectual work for their students. (MDM)

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Doctoral Dissertation

Evaluation of the Reorganization of Northboro Elementary School in Palm Beach County, Florida: A Ten-Year Perspective

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the reorganization of Northboro Elementary School from the academic years of 1991–1992 through 2000–2001. The study was designed to determine the effectiveness of achieving five objectives established for the reorganization in two-year increments of implementation from the perspectives of the administrative staff, teachers, paraprofessionals, and parents. The reorganization objectives were (1) to develop a physically and psychologically safe environment for all students; (2) to implement a public magnet program to racially balance the population with non-Black students; (3) to increase student achievement scores on the state assessment test in the areas of reading, writing, and mathematics; (4) to increase parent involvement at the school; and (5) to improve the quality and increase the amount of staff development. Utilizing the focus group method, the 35 participants represented, 4 administrative staff, 9 paraprofessionals, 4 reading teachers, 3 regular and 6 Montessori teachers, and 9 parents. The Levels of Use of the Innovation (LoU) (Hall, Loucks, Rutherford, & Newlove, 1975) was used for the assessment of all aspects of the reorganization. As a result of the evaluation, it was determined that all the objectives were met in accordance with the LoU model. The major findings were: (1) Using an effective reorganization tool, such as the Levels of Use, gave the leader clear direction for reorganization, from orienting, to managing, and finally to integrating the use of the innovation. (2) Parent participation in the reorganization process was essential for effective teaching and learning. Parent involvement was critical in promoting a sound physically and psychologically safe environment. (3) Implementing an innovative Montessori Magnet program reduced the racial balance, and drew racially, economically, and educationally diverse students. Based on the findings, it is recommended that additional evaluations be conducted to include: (1) Examining the extent race or age had on the overall success of the reorganization. (2) Determining if the Montessori, Reading Recovery, and Levels of Use strategies are only effective at the elementary level. (3) Assessing the academic achievement of eighth- and tenth-grade students who participated in the Reading Recovery Program.

Language: English

Published: Cincinnati, Ohio, 2004

Article

Open for Business: Learning Economics Through Social Interaction in a Student-Operated Store

Publication: Journal of Social Studies Research, vol. 35, no. 1

Pages: 39-55

Americas, Business education, Economics education, North America, United States of America, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: This study examines teaching and learning economics and entrepreneurship through a student-run Montessori middle school store. By designing and managing a school store, students created a 'community of practice' to learn economics concepts in their daily environment. Questions guiding this study were: (a) How do students' social-interactions in a Montessori middle school student-operated business demonstrate economics content knowledge? (b) How do students' social-interactions in a Montessori middle school student-operated business demonstrate economics skills? (c) How do students' business roles in the store develop their understanding of economics principles? Findings indicate that: (1) student activities in the school store promoted learning through social interaction; (2) the type and number of business roles a student assumed created opportunities for economic learning; (3) student entrepreneurs expressed specific knowledge of economics concepts, and, (4) students' decision-making and ownership affected behavior. Additionally, features of Kohlberg's (1985) concept of Just Community supported the learning environment. This study can provide social studies teachers and teacher-educators with a model for learning economics (or social studies) concepts through a curricular-based student-run enterprise.

Language: English

ISSN: 0885-985X, 2352-2798

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