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979 results

Article

Five Factors Influencing the Students’ Motivation to Learn English as a Foreign Language: A Closer Look into Montessori Classroom Environment

Available from: Universitas Lancang Kuning (Indonesia)

Publication: REiLA: Journal of Research and Innovation in Language, vol. 2, no. 2

Pages: 76-84

Asia, Classroom environment, Indonesia, Montessori Method

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Abstract/Notes: Good learning environment will bring out qualified students. This study focuses on the Montessori method, which is an approach of education designed to train the students’ independence in learning. The study uses descriptive quantitative research design to describe the factors of Montessori classroom environment on the motivation of students in Royal Prime Montessori Elementary School Pekanbaru in academic year 2018/2019. The sample of study is 55 students selected from five classes. The data were collected using questionnaire and observation checklist. This study found five factors influencing the students’ motivational condition, i.e., teacher’s presence, personal attitude, Montessori materials, classroom conditions and friends’ influence. This study revealed that the students taught with this method are active and cooperative during their English learning activities.

Language: English

DOI: 10.31849/reila.v2i2.3165

ISSN: 2685-3906

Conference Paper

The Application of Student Portfolios in Primary/Intermediate and Self-Contained/Multi-Age Team Classroom Environments: Implications for Instruction, Learning, and Assessment

Available from: ERIC

Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association

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Abstract/Notes: Portfolios have gained wide acceptance as a learning and assessment tool. Yet, little research has been reported on the practices of teachers who are actually using portfolios within their classrooms and how those practices are moderated by contextual variables. This research examined the instructional, learning, and assessment roles of student portfolios, and explored, from the perspective of the classroom teacher, variations in portfolio applications associated with teaching level (primary versus intermediate) and classroom environment (self-contained versus multiage/teaming). Teachers for kindergarten through grade 5 in 3 elementary schools (n=314) completed a survey questionnaire regarding the instructional and assessment uses to which portfolios are put within their classrooms. To further examine patterns of portfolio use, a subset of 44 teachers was interviewed to explore teacher perceptions about the impact of student portfolios on themselves and their students. Results suggest that these teachers make deliberate decisions regarding uses of their students' portfolios, decisions that appear heavily impacted by the maturity or skill level of the child, the purposes of the application, and the classroom environment within which the application occurs. They also depend on whether the portfolio product is in a formative state (working portfolio) or final state (performance portfolio). (Contains 7 tables and 14 references.) (Author/SLD)

Language: English

Published: Montreal, Canada, Apr 19-24, 1994

Article

The Application of Student Portfolios in Primary-Intermediate and Self-Contained-Multiage Team Classroom Environments: Implications for Instruction, Learning, and Assessment

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Applied Measurement in Education, vol. 13, no. 2

Pages: 209-228

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Abstract/Notes: Portfolios have gained wide acceptance as a learning and assessment tool. Yet, little research has been reported on the practices of teachers who are actually using portfolios within their classrooms and how those practices are moderated by contextual variables. This research examined the instructional, learning, and assessment roles of student portfolios and explored, from the perspective of the classroom teacher, variations in portfolio applications associated with teaching level (primary vs. intermediate) and classroom environment (self-contained vs. multiage-teaming). Kindergarten through Grade 5 teachers in 13 elementary schools completed a survey questionnaire regarding the instructional and assessment uses to which portfolios are put within their classrooms. To further examine for patterns of portfolio use, a subset of teachers was interviewed to explore the perceptions that teachers hold about the impact of student portfolios on themselves and on their students. The results suggest that Kindergarten through Grade 5 teachers make deliberate decisions regarding uses of their students' portfolios, decisions that appear heavily impacted by the maturity or skill level of the child, the purposes of the application, and the classroom environment within which the application occurs. They also depend on whether the portfolio product is in a formative state (working portfolio) or final state (performance portfolio).

Language: English

DOI: 10.1207/S15324818AME1302_5

ISSN: 0895-7347

Reading Achievement and Perceptions Regarding the Multi-age Classroom Environment

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Language: English

Book

Creating the Multi-Age Classroom: Organization, Curriculum, Instructional Strategies and Assessment for the Multi-Age Classroom Plus Considerations for Getting Started and Techniques for Classroom Management

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Abstract/Notes: Intended for teachers who have asked for information on how to manage a multi-age classroom, this book outlines the ideal classroom as it exists when all of the multi-age components are put in place. Opening sections of the guide discuss creating the multi-age classroom, and the advantages and principles of multi-age instruction. The next sections provide overviews of classroom organization, instructional strategies, curriculum, assessment and evaluation, and getting started. Each of these sections includes the overview, results of the changes brought about by multi-age instruction, and advice from the experts. Additional sections address scheduling, grouping strategies, working with Bloom's taxonomy, projects for active learners, using novels for literature instruction, and helping children discover themselves and others. Separate sections address the management of mathematics, authentic assessment and evaluation, and student record forms, with sample forms included. A glossary of

Language: English

Published: Edmonds, Washington: CATS Publications, Apr 1995

Edition: Revised

ISBN: 1-886753-03-2

Article

Visual Environmental Scale: Analysing the Early Childhood Education Environment

Available from: SpringerLink

Publication: Early Childhood Education Journal, vol. 47, no. 1

Pages: 43-51

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Abstract/Notes: Although children’s physical environments play an important role in their development, there have been few empirical studies on the interior design of early childhood centres. This is partly due to a lack of adequate methods and instruments for the systematic spatial investigation of educational environments. In light of this, the following paper presents a qualitative method for such systematic investigation, which we shall call visual environment analysis. It also presents the results of the application of this method to ten early childhood centre environments, which can be ranged between the two extremes of restraint and expressiveness. The analysis shows that early childhood centre environments may be shaped by partly conflicting aims, such as giving children as much freedom as possible on the one hand and providing them with a stimulating atmosphere on the other. The paper therefore discusses both visual environment analysis as a method and, in applying this method, the interior design of a number of educational environments.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/s10643-018-0914-x

ISSN: 1573-1707

Master's Thesis

The Effect of Teacher Interactions on Classroom Management in a Montessori Environment

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: The investigation was intended to find the effect of teacher interactions on classroom control and management in a Montessori environment. The research was conducted in three Montessori classrooms of early childhood: two primary and one toddler, in a private school. The participants were the lead teachers of each classroom and selected parents who have had two or more children in different classrooms. The data collection instruments used were observations and interviews with teachers, surveys with parents, analyzing student records and student work samples. The data showed that positive teacher interactions and positive usage of language had a great impact on classroom management and negative interactions and poor communications had a negative effect on classroom management. Further, the teachers had better control and management of the classroom if they had more knowledge of Montessori principles and adhered to those guidelines. The result of the research indicates that teachers who had more training, experience and knowledge may have better classroom management and also the capability to work within Montessori guidelines and principles.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2014

Master's Thesis

Effects of Classroom Talk Lessons on Student Perceptions of Collaborative Group Work in a Remote, Synchronous Montessori Elementary Learning Environment

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, COVID-19 Pandemic, Lower elementary, Online learning

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Abstract/Notes: This mixed-methods action research examined the effects of classroom talk lessons on children’s perceptions of collaborative group work in an online Montessori learning environment during the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants were 19 Lower Elementary students and one teacher/investigator. All work was online, both synchronous and asynchronous. Students were presented with lessons in classroom talk, and practiced these skills during online collaboration in the creation of a student newsletter. Key findings were that students use of classroom talk behaviors and rigorous thinking increased slightly over the four-week period and students’ perceptions of their community identity and the value of their ideas increased over the course of the intervention, most notably in younger students. Teaching classroom talk had positive effects on student agency, depth of collaborative work, and grace and courtesy in this digital Montessori classroom. Respectful disagreement was identified as an area for future study.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2021

Article

Order, Organization and Beauty In The Classroom: A Prerequisite, Not An Option

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 24, no. 2

Pages: 34-39

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori education, at its best, is a combination of art and science, an exquisite balance of subjectivity and objectivity. When done well, a Montessori environment resembles a carefully crafted piece of art, a skillfully constructed laboratory for the study of life. The work of creating such a masterpiece is a labor of love and a commitment of extraordinary depth. It is not an easy undertaking. Occasionally, the author steps into a Montessori environment in which something is clearly askew, where a fundamental element of Montessori's vision and pedagogy are missing. The author's observations reveal that two particular components of the prepared environment are absent more often than any other: organization and beauty, both key to successful Montessori classrooms. On this topic, Dr. Maria Montessori was relentless: organization and beauty in the classroom are a prerequisite, not an option. A well-organized learning environment encourages autonomy as the child grows and creates himself. The role of the teacher is to provide support as the child moves through this process and toward normalization. Therefore, it is the responsibility of the teacher to develop and maintain an overarching order within the classroom. Order and organization in all areas of the classroom are necessary for the child to self-educate at his level of capability. The role of beauty in the Montessori classroom is fundamental, for it is intimately tied to auto-education, evoking interest in the materials and in learning. Just as order assists the child in spontaneous activity and supports his efforts to self-educate, so too does beauty. Beauty is the voice that calls the child to engage with the materials and elevates him to a higher level of grace and courtesy as he interacts in his environment.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Managing the Use of Resources in Multi-Grade Classrooms

Available from: African Journals Online

Publication: South African Journal of Education, vol. 39, no. 3

Africa, Classroom environment, Montessori materials, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Nongraded schools, Prepared environment, South Africa, Southern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa

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Abstract/Notes: This study examined how teachers in multi-grade classrooms manage and use available resources in their classrooms. The study focused on multi-grade classrooms in farm schools in the Free State province of South Africa that cover Grades 1 to 9. The concepts “multi-grade classrooms” and “resources” are explained below. The availability and utilisation of resources in multi-grade classrooms is discussed in some depth. A qualitative research design was used to collect data. Interviews were conducted with 9 teachers who worked in multi-grade classrooms. The data reveals that the availability of resources has improved somewhat in the multi-grade classrooms surveyed; however, textbooks specifically meant for multi-grade classrooms are still lacking. The data also points to several other trends. For example, most multi-grade schools in the sample have insufficient resources. Where available, the resources are either under-utilised or used improperly. Furthermore, it is usually the case that learners are required to share resources across various grades. Moreover, teachers often use their personal resources to get their work done, and in this regard, smartphones play an important part. Finally, the study also reveals that teachers do try to use various types of resources to cater for different learning styles.Keywords: activity centres; classroom organisation; Montessori educational theory; multi-grade classrooms; resource corners; resources

Language: English

DOI: 10.15700/saje.v39n3a1599

ISSN: 2076-3433

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