Quick Search
For faster results please use our Quick Search engine.

Advanced Search

Search across titles, abstracts, authors, and keywords.
Advanced Search Guide.

979 results

Article

Montessori Teacher–Environmental Advocate: Going Green in the Classroom and at Home

Publication: Tomorrow's Child, vol. 15, no. 4

Pages: 21–22

See More

Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

Student Perceptions of Their Elementary Classrooms: Montessori vs. Traditional Environments

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 13, no. 1

Pages: 45–48

Perceptions, ⛔ No DOI found

See More

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Feng Shui and the Prepared Environment [Review of Feng Shui for the Classroom: 101 Easy-to-Use Ideas, by Renee Heiss]

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 19, no. 3

Pages: 4

Public Montessori

See More

Language: English

Doctoral Dissertation

Independent Learning in Four Montessori Elementary Classrooms

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

See More

Abstract/Notes: This is a descriptive study of independent learning in four Montessori elementary classrooms. It shows relationships between groups of variables for the student, teacher, and environment--with independent learning. Data were collected for the project in three schools in the Seattle area. A profile on each student consisted of demographic information, scores on four measures of independence, and data regarding observed classroom behavior. The teachers provided background information and philosophical orientation through questionnaire and their classroom behaviors were observed. The environment, including the physical and underlying structural climate, was revealed through teacher interview and observation of whole-class behavior. The resultant data were examined for relationships through correlational techniques. Student background, specifically sex, age, and previous Montessori experience, were not found to be predictive of observed independent learning. Teacher background and years of teaching experience in Montessori were also not predictive of the independent learning that occurred in the classroom. The environment, prepared by a Montessori teacher to facilitate independent learning, provided for self-directed study. Independent learning was observed by the behaviors of the individual student, the teacher, and the whole-class similarly in the four classrooms. It was observed in a variety of students. All four teachers had Montessori teacher education and experience. All classrooms were set up physically with shelves of manipulative materials and structurally with student-directed expectations. It was concluded that independent learning can occur when allowed and provided for.

Language: English

Published: Seattle, Washington, 1987

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Monkey See Monkey Do: Modeling Positive Behavior in the Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Lower elementary, Montessori method of education

See More

Abstract/Notes: The research experiment was conducted at a dual language Montessori school in a lower elementary classroom that contained first grade students. The classroom contained thirteen students in total, with five boys and eight girls, and two head teachers. The research investigated if peaceful lessons (grace and courtesy lessons) and peaceful teacher modeling would affect the student’s behaviors and concentration in the classroom. The research began with baseline data collection through student interviews, student work, and a behavior tally sheet completed during the great work period in the morning. After the first two weeks of school, daily peaceful lessons were conducted with the students, and the teacher made mindful changes, to model positive language and behaviors in the classroom. The data concluded that peaceful lessons and teacher modeling had a positive effect on the behavior and concentration of the student’s in the classroom. Peaceful lessons and teacher modeling will continue once a week to prolong positive student behaviors in the classroom environment.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2013

Doctoral Dissertation

The Characteristics of Problem Solving Transfer in a Montessori Classroom

Available from: Baylor University Libraries

See More

Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this case study was to examine the use of problem solving strategies and instruction within the Montessori model of learning and to determine if problem solving and transfer occurred. The following research questions were investigated: (1) What Montessori model characteristics are similar to the characteristics reported in the problem solving research which facilitate transfer? (2) In what ways does problem solving within the Montessori classroom transfer? (3) What are the factors that influence problem solving transfer in a Montessori classroom? The site for the study was a fourth through sixth grade level classroom in a private, non-profit Montessori school. Participating in the research were 16 students, two teachers, and a parent of each of the students. The study was conducted over a eight month time period. Data collection and analysis involved both qualitative and quantitative methods. The qualitative data were gathered through video-taping of 24 classroom lessons, audio-taping interviews with the students, teachers, and parents and curriculum document analysis. Quantitative instruments included the TONI-3: Test of Nonverbal Intelligence, 3rd Edition, the Problem Solving and Thinking Processes scale, the Flanders Interaction Analysis Categories-Modified, and the Engagement Check. These are the findings: (a) as implemented in this study, the Montessori model of learning, did incorporate instructional strategies that facilitated problem solving and transfer; (b) instances of problem solving, problem solving transfer, and knowledge transfer did occur; and (c) six specific instructional and curriculum strategies influenced the opportunities for problem solving and transfer in the classroom. This research contributes to the field by studying transfer with elementary age students in the natural setting of a classroom and by providing a framework for examining the factors which encourage problem solving.

Language: English

Published: Waco, Texas, 2002

Report

Instructional Practices and Implementation Issues in Multiage Classrooms.

Available from: ERIC

See More

Abstract/Notes: This report summarizes research literature on multiage classrooms, explaining how they operate, and describes a study of a low-performing, predominantly Native American school district which adopted multiage classrooms as its primary reform strategy. District teachers completed surveys about: planning; collaboration; student groupings and interactions; assessment; planning resources; preparedness; faculty development; perceptions about the effects of multiage classrooms and looping on student learning; opinions on advantages and disadvantages of multiage classrooms and looping; and suggestions for improving instruction and learning. Researchers observed 37 classrooms and interviewed principals and district administrators. They also collected data from a comparison school in a neighboring district that had successful multiage grouping. Teachers were dissatisfied with how multiage classrooms were mandated by district administrators. The mandate created camps of teachers divided over

Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C., Dec 2000

Article

Whole Language, Montessori Classroom: The Approach Sweeping Traditional Classrooms Belongs in Montessori Schools, Too

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 4, no. 1

Pages: 7

Language acquisition, Language experience approach in education, Montessori method of education, Public Montessori

See More

Language: English

Article

An Intervention Study: Removing Supplemented Materials from Montessori Classrooms Associated with Better Child Outcomes

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 2, no. 1

Pages: 16-26

Americas, Angeline Stoll Lillard - Writings, Montessori materials, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, United States of America

See More

Abstract/Notes: Montessori classrooms vary a good deal in implementation, and one way in which implementation differs is the provision of materials.  Specifically, some classrooms use only Montessori materials, whereas others supplement the Montessori materials with commercially available materials like puzzles and games.  A prior study suggested this might be a reason for observed differences across studies and classrooms (Author, 2012) but an intervention study is the best test.  The present study presents such an intervention with 52 children in 3 Montessori classrooms with Supplementary materials. All children were given 6 pretests, and non-Montessori materials were removed from 2 of the classrooms.  Four months later, children were retested to see how much they changed across that period.  Children in the classrooms from which the non-Montessori materials were removed advanced significantly more in early reading and executive function, and to some degree advanced more in early math.  There were no differences across the classroom types in amount of change on the tests of vocabulary, social knowledge, or social skills.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v2i1.5678

ISSN: 2378-3923

Thesis

Autism in Early Childhood Education Montessori Environments: Parents' and Teachers' Perspectives

Available from: Auckland University of Technology - Institutional Repository

Australasia, Australia and New Zealand, Autism, Special education, Children with disabilities, Montessori method of education, New Zealand, Oceania, Parent and child, Parent-teacher relationships, Special education, Teacher-student relationships

See More

Abstract/Notes: There is very little research about children with Autism in Montessori early childhood education in Aotearoa New Zealand. This study examined parents’ and teachers’ perspectives of children with Autism attending Montessori early childhood education environments. This thesis documents literature that explores and critiques Montessori philosophy and the teaching of children on the Autism spectrum. The purpose of this study was to gain insights into the Montessori teaching approach in early childhood education, as a supportive environment for children with Autism in the early years. However, I discovered that the Montessori environment is less than ideal if the teachers do not understand Autism Spectrum Disorder and do not make allowances for the symptoms that present themselves. It was my intention to explore the factors that complemented both Montessori and the support of children with Autism with an approach that is conducive to learning and encourages positive behavioural patterns. The findings revealed three main indicators being identified as important. These were social competence, language and communication, and individual interests and sensory implications. However, not all findings were positive. The parents all agreed that the teachers needed to be flexible and understanding in their approach, and many Montessori teachers are strict in their routine and are not prepared to sway from their teaching method to assist a child with Autism. This study suggests that Montessori early childhood teachers would benefit from professional development in the areas of including children with special needs, particularly Autism Spectrum Disorder, particularly in regards to understanding the unique characteristics of children with Autism and how they can effectively use the Montessori philosophy, equipment and prepared environment to support each child’s learning and development. Suggestions for future professional learning for Montessori teachers include the provision of professional development in including children with “special needs”, particularly Autism Spectrum Disorder for Montessori early childhood teachers. It is not only the Montessori philosophy and the prepared environment that supports the child with Autism, but the teacher’s awareness of the child’s needs and a willingness to be flexible in their approach.

Language: English

Published: Auckland, New Zealand, 2015

Advanced Search