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769 results

Article

Overview of the Bachman Lake Community School

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 39, no. 2

Pages: 113–120

North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals

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Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

An Overview of the Bachman Lake Community School

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 39, no. 2

Pages: 113-120

Americas, Bachman Lake Community School, Early childhood education, Lumin Education - History, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals, Parent participation, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Tom Loew says that East Dallas Community Schools have been creating beautiful and functional environments for decades, but developing Bachman Lake Community School was more than creating a school. They also had to establish a community center, scale up staff quickly, service a wide number of families, leverage Montessori training and related costs, and ensure a Montessori approach. Most families at Bachman Lake are below the poverty line, very young, few are native speakers, and some are without immigration status. A mental health component is critical, home visits are frequent, professional intervention happens in homes, parents engage in "reflective service" utilizing licensed counselors, and the school encourages father participation. [This talk was presented at the NAMTA conference titled "Montessori from Birth to Six: In Search of Community Values," Minneapolis, MN, November 7-10, 2013.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

En el Barrio [East Dallas Community School and Lindsley Park Community School, Dallas, TX]

Publication: Tomorrow's Child, vol. 16, no. 1

Pages: 47–49

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

Program Profiles [Clissold School, Chicago, Illinois; Bonneville Elementary School, Pocatello, Idaho; Reading Community School, Reading, Ohio]

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 1, no. 2

Pages: 9

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Does Preschool Curriculum Make a Difference in Primary School Performance: Insights into the Variety of Preschool Activities and Their Effects on School Achievement and Behaviour in the Caribbean Island of Trinidad; Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal evidence

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Early Child Development and Care, vol. 103, no. 1

Pages: 27-42

Americas, Caribbean, Latin America and the Caribbean, Trinidad and Tobago

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Abstract/Notes: Preschool education is an important and much studied topic in developed countries, and of growing importance in the third world. Studies exploring preschool experience have noted positive effects when comparing children with access to preschool versus children without access, and effects of particular curriculum approaches over the length of primary schooling. This study adopts a focused sample, cross‐sectional design to explore the types of preschool experience available (denoted by types of preschool activities which equate broadly to curriculum approaches) and whether variation in preschool experience affects core curriculum (English, science, mathematics) performance and classroom behaviours throughout the years of primary schooling in Trinidad and when children complete their primary education in the form of a national ‘common entrance examination’ for entry into a stratified secondary school system. Results show that a large majority of the sampled children attended preschool and that most of the preschool experience was traditional and teacher centred. Neither child centred or teacher centred preschool activities affected academic performance in the core subjects during the primary school years or at the end of their primary school career. Type of preschool activity did affect teacher perception of behaviour in class. Child centred experience facilitated a social/peer orientation in children. High levels of teacher centred experience detracted from later relationships with teacher. Results were confounded by social class, with middle class children having most access to (the limited amount available) child centred preschool experience and performing at the highest academic and behavioural levels in the classroom although in limited numbers. The discussion questions the appropriacy of the various preschool activities for pupils within a cultural orientation of traditional upbringing and primary schooling practices.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/0300443941030103

ISSN: 0300-4430, 1476-8275

Article

The Montessori Erdkinder: Three Abstracts [Montessori de Terra Linda, San Rafael, CA; Hershey Montessori School, Concord Township, OH; Lake Country School, Minneapolis, MN]

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 18, no. 1

Pages: 172–182

North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals

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Abstract/Notes: Describes three projects: (1) the Laufenburg Ranch Project, a historical organic farm and agricultural and environmental education center; (2) the Hershey Montessori School's efforts to teach adolescents about the earth; and (3) the Lake Country School, which developed a farm campus and nature center as an integral part of its educational program.

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

The Montessori Land School: The Root and Branch of Lake Country School

Publication: Communications: Journal of the Association Montessori Internationale (2009-2012), vol. 2011, no. 1-2

Pages: 176–184

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Language: English

ISSN: 1877-539X

Article

Aflame: Columbia, SC, School Fire Galvanizes a Community [Montessori Early Learning Center and School of the Arts, Columbia, South Carolina]

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 18, no. 2

Pages: 10

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Maintaining an Empowered School Community: Introducing Digital Technologies by Building Digital Literacies at Beehive Montessori School

Available from: UCL Open Environment

Publication: London Review of Education, vol. 18, no. 3

Pages: 356-372

Australasia, Australia, Australia and New Zealand, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - Evaluation, Montessori schools, Oceania

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Abstract/Notes: In 2019, educators at Beehive Montessori School (Beehive) in Western Australia implemented their self-defined digital literacies framework. The framework guided their approach to, and use of, digital technologies in their classrooms. Doing so came out of a whole school action research project in which the school became a hub for inquiry and educators, and researchers worked together to identify issues and develop improvement processes. At the project conclusion, the educators and researchers had collaboratively defined a solution that met the mandated curriculum needs and fitted with the school autonomy. Most importantly the project and the solution empowered educators, as it aligned with the school-identified virtues and utilized the three-period lesson to teach it, all of which was consistent with Montessori pedagogy.

Language: English

DOI: 10.14324/LRE.18.3.03

ISSN: 1474-8460

Book

The Parent-Centered Early School: Highland Community School of Milwaukee

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

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Abstract/Notes: In May, 1991, the newly chosen Milwaukee Public Schools Superintendent, Dr. Ho,vard Fuller, visited Highland Community School. His main question to parents and staff assembled to greet him was, "What lessons can we public school people learn from you?" Highland people had cogent ideas to pass on to him. This book is a more formal response in which I hope the hundreds of people who have continuously created Highland in its first twenty-five years speak through me in answer to him and to his colleagues elsewhere in public education. Highland began in late 1968, and by 1994 was one of only ten schools in the entire country to qualify for state-financed vouchers to independent urban schools. It is small: about seventy ethnically and economically diverse students aged two-and-a-half to ten years, three teachers and three assistants, a full-time executive director, and three part-time helpers, including a parent coordinator. One of the teachers doubles as principal. Annual expenditures per pupil are about $2,800. The curriculum is Montessori-based. The building is a century-old mansion. The school is governed by a nine-member parent board of directors and helped, primarily in fund-raising, by an advisory group of trustees. It is located in Milwaukee's Near West Side, an economically depressed and violent neighborhood (Jeffrey Dahmer's apartment, since razed, was only five blocks from the school). This is the story of a small school. Faced with the vastness of urban decay and its impact on educational institutions, the reader might question whether describing and analyzing this diminutive organization has any relevance to urban education. Despite differences between it and stereotypical urban public schools, however, it brings a message to American education much more important than its size seems to warrant. Its size is precisely the point. Change nucleates and incubates in small settings. Our huge society conditions us to think in terms of large numbers, sweeping change, vast federal programs. Government may be able to create contexts for change, but the changes themselves have to be brought about where individuals assemble to meet their mutual needs. Whether their relationships will be harmonious and productive, or acrimonious and dysfunctional, depends on how the organization is structured and what spirit has been breathed into it. This book fleshes out the organizational and attitudinal reasons that Highland works so well and what public education can learn from this small inner-city educational oasis. As a framework for the organization of this study, let us first review factors that research has revealed make a school effective.

Language: English

Published: New York, New York: Garland, 1997

Edition: 1st

ISBN: 978-1-315-05106-2

Series: Studies in Education and Culture , 10

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