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Article

An Overview of the Bachman Lake Community School

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 39, no. 2

Pages: 113-120

Americas, Bachman Lake Community School, Early childhood education, Lumin Education - History, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, Parent participation, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Tom Loew says that East Dallas Community Schools have been creating beautiful and functional environments for decades, but developing Bachman Lake Community School was more than creating a school. They also had to establish a community center, scale up staff quickly, service a wide number of families, leverage Montessori training and related costs, and ensure a Montessori approach. Most families at Bachman Lake are below the poverty line, very young, few are native speakers, and some are without immigration status. A mental health component is critical, home visits are frequent, professional intervention happens in homes, parents engage in "reflective service" utilizing licensed counselors, and the school encourages father participation. [This talk was presented at the NAMTA conference titled "Montessori from Birth to Six: In Search of Community Values," Minneapolis, MN, November 7-10, 2013.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Overview of the Bachman Lake Community School

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 39, no. 2

Pages: 113–120

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Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Does Preschool Curriculum Make a Difference in Primary School Performance: Insights into the Variety of Preschool Activities and Their Effects on School Achievement and Behaviour in the Caribbean Island of Trinidad; Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal evidence

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Early Child Development and Care, vol. 103, no. 1

Pages: 27-42

Americas, Caribbean, Latin America and the Caribbean, Trinidad and Tobago

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Abstract/Notes: Preschool education is an important and much studied topic in developed countries, and of growing importance in the third world. Studies exploring preschool experience have noted positive effects when comparing children with access to preschool versus children without access, and effects of particular curriculum approaches over the length of primary schooling. This study adopts a focused sample, cross‐sectional design to explore the types of preschool experience available (denoted by types of preschool activities which equate broadly to curriculum approaches) and whether variation in preschool experience affects core curriculum (English, science, mathematics) performance and classroom behaviours throughout the years of primary schooling in Trinidad and when children complete their primary education in the form of a national ‘common entrance examination’ for entry into a stratified secondary school system. Results show that a large majority of the sampled children attended preschool and that most of the preschool experience was traditional and teacher centred. Neither child centred or teacher centred preschool activities affected academic performance in the core subjects during the primary school years or at the end of their primary school career. Type of preschool activity did affect teacher perception of behaviour in class. Child centred experience facilitated a social/peer orientation in children. High levels of teacher centred experience detracted from later relationships with teacher. Results were confounded by social class, with middle class children having most access to (the limited amount available) child centred preschool experience and performing at the highest academic and behavioural levels in the classroom although in limited numbers. The discussion questions the appropriacy of the various preschool activities for pupils within a cultural orientation of traditional upbringing and primary schooling practices.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/0300443941030103

ISSN: 0300-4430, 1476-8275

Article

School Accreditation News

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 27, no. 4

Pages: 18

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Abstract/Notes: The AMS accreditation designation indicates that an AMS member school meets a well-defined standard of excellence.ACTON MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Initial Accreditation) Acton Darlene Paquette, Head of School THE BOYD SCHOOL (Reaccreditation) 7 campuses in Northern Virginia MaryAnn Boyd, Head of School ETON SCHOOL (Reaccreditation) Bellevue, WA Russell Smith, Head of School THE HOCKESSIN MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Reaccreditation) Hockessin, DE Janette Henry, Head of School MARIPOSA MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Initial Accreditation-Infant, Toddler, Early Childhood, and Lower Elementary levels) Austin, TX Whitney Falcon, Head of School MONTESSORI ACADEMY OF CHICAGO (Initial Accreditation) Chicago, IL Fosca White, Head of School MONTESSORI CHILDREN'S HOUSE OF AUBURN (Initial Accreditation) Auburn Kari Cafeo, Head of School NORTHGLADE MONTESSORI MAGNET SCHOOL (Reaccreditation) Kalamazoo, MI Dale Mogaji, Head of School SHREWSBURY MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Initial Accreditation) Shrewsbury Kari Cafeo, Head of School SUMMIT MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Initial Accreditation-Toddler, Early Childhood, and Lower Elementary levels) Framingham Martha Torrence, Head of School THE VILLAGE SCHOOL (Reaccreditation) Waldwick, NJ Marilyn Larkin, Head of School WEST SIDE MONTESSORI (Reaccreditation) Toledo, OH Lynn Fisher, Head of School WOODINVILLE MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Reaccreditation) Bothell, WA Mary Schneider, Head of School WYOMING VALLEY MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Reaccreditation) Kingston, PA Dennis Puhalla, Head of School

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Doctoral Dissertation

A Study of Pre-School Education in the Republic of Ireland with Particular Reference to Those Pre-Schools Which are Listed by the Irish Pre-School Playgroups Association in Cork City and County

Available from: British Librarty - EthOS

Comparative education, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Montessori method of education, Ireland, Montessori method of education, Northern Europe, Preschool education

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Abstract/Notes: This study was undertaken in order to investigate the activities which took place in Irish pre-schools other than those within the formal school system. The principle focus of the research concerned the degree to which the pre-school children were being 'cognitively stretched' by the curriculum in which they were engaged. The social, linguistic, physical and creative development of these children was also considered.An historical review of the theory of play and recent research in this area was undertaken.Twenty-three pre-schools were taken at random from the membership list in Cork city and county of the Irish Pre- School Playgroups Association. One pre-school which was not a member was added. Prior to embarking upon the study, a history of the I.P.P.A. was given.The ethnographic research strategy was found to be the most suitable method of assessing empirically the nature and frequency of play in the pre-school. This study, which took place between 1986 and 1990, was therefore eclectic in nature, employing a multi-faceted approach encompassing a target child observational schedule, interviews, a study of classrooms, a questionnaire and an interaction analysis system.Briefly, the results showed that the 157 children engaged in this study were being cognitively stretched for approximately one quarter of the time if they were in a playgroup and approximately one half of the time if they were in a Montessori setting. Social and linguistic behaviour was limited by the actions of the pre-school leaders and physically or creatively challenging behaviour was rarely observed. The fact that the children played alone for half of the total time spent in the pre-school was most striking.The most important finding to emerge from the study of language in the twenty-four pre-schools was the fact that the children rarely communicated verbally. Dialogue was almost non-existent and children's questions were very sparse. In order to place the above in a National context, a questionnaire was sent in 1990 to a random sample of one hundred I.P.P.A. members in the 26 counties of the Republic of Ireland. Unfortunately, only 39 responded. However, of note was that approximately 25% of playgroup leaders had degrees and four-fifths of them were mothers in their mid-thirties. They strongly disagreed with the teaching of the 3Rs and felt that much more government money should be devoted to playgroups and in-service training for their personnel.

Language: English

Published: Hull, England, 1993

Doctoral Dissertation

Executive Function, Social-Emotional Skills, and Academic Competence in Three Preschool Programmes: Pathways to School Readiness

Available from: British Librarty - EthOS

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Abstract/Notes: Research findings indicate that executive function (EF), social-emotional skills, and pre-academic competence significantly promote children's school readiness and later success. School readiness broadly refers to a combination of skills necessary to function successfully in school and lack thereof may increase the risk of children's school problems. Therefore, it is essential for school systems to provide appropriate and timely support to the development of these fundamental skills. The present study focused on three particular preschool programmes: Montessori, Reggio Emilia, and the traditional play-based (British Columbia Early Learning Framework: BCEFL) programmes in Western Canada. Although they are popular, there is little empirical research that examines and compares the benefits of these programmes to the development of school readiness skills. As such, the present study aimed to 1) determine the effectiveness of these three preschool programmes in Western Canada on the development of children's school readiness; and 2) examine other sources of influences in the child, family and school in relation to the development of school readiness skills. Overall, 119 preschool children (48 Montessori, 42 Reggio Emilia, 29 BCELF) participated in the study. Observation was conducted once in the autumn of 2015 for each classroom using the CLASS observation tool. Teachers and parents of participating children filled in a series of questionnaires regarding the quality of their relationship with their child and their perceptions of daily EF and social-emotional skills of their child. The researcher also assessed individual children's fluid intelligence, EF, and pre-academic competence. The results showed that 1) although Montessori education appeared to be the most effective in facilitating numeracy skills, no curriculum stood out as notably more effective than any of the others at improving other areas of school readiness skills; 2) well-run classrooms where teachers were effective in time, behavioural, and attention management were most effective in promoting children's numeracy skills; 3) EF, social-emotional skills, and pre-academic competence exhibited an overlapping developmental process over time; 4) relational quality in both home and school environments significantly affected the development of school readiness skills, especially social-emotional skills; and 5) adults' perceptions of children's EF and social-emotional skills had a significant consequence for how teachers and parents formed their relationships with their children.

Language: English

Published: Oxford, England, 2018

Article

An Excerpt from Diverse Families, Desirable Schools: Public Montessori in the Era of School Choice

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 31, no. 2

Pages: 55

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: In a Boston Globe Sunday Magazine feature, the school was described as a "a scrubbed oasis," in a neighborhood of vacant lots and empty buildings, overseen by Gadpaille, "an angel priestess in red oxfords and a blue smock." Though she started her teaching career at private, predominantly White Montessori schools, including Rambusch's Whitby School, and as the founding director of Lexington Montessori School, Gadpaille's Montessori Family Center was designed for Roxbury's working-class Black families, offering full-day year-round childcare with half of the children attending tuition free through Head Start funding. Gadpaille envisioned a community of 150 Black-owned homes centered around a Montessori school serving ages birth to 18, and she recruited famed architect R. Buckminster Fuller, noted for his space-age geodesic domes, who skipped part of his Harvard reunion to volunteer the design.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

School Accreditation News

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 28, no. 2

Pages: 19

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Abstract/Notes: AMS accreditation is a designation that an AMS member school meets a well-defined standard of excellence.AMARE MONTESSORI (SATELLITE OF MONTESSORI ACADEMY) (Initial Accreditation) Clarksville, TN Jaime Yeager, Head of School BRIXHAM MONTESSORI FRIENDS SCHOOL (Initial Accreditation) York, ME Alica B. Johnson-Grafe, Head of School CHILDREN'S TREE MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Initial Accreditation) Old Saybrook, Connecticut Marci Martindale, Head of School COUNTRYSIDE MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Reaccreditation) Charlotte, NC Dolores Murgolo, Interim Head of School HILL COUNTRY MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Reaccreditation) Boerne, TX Steven Whewell, Head of School KENNEBEC MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Reaccreditation) Fairfield, ME Rebecca Green, Head of School MONTESSORI ACADEMY (Addition of an Accredited Infant Program) Brentwood, TN James R. Bernstorf, Head of School MONTESSORI ACADEMY OF ARLINGTON (Addition of an Accredited Infant Program) Arlington, TX Pamela Dunbar, Head of School MONTESSORI SCHOOL OF MCLEAN (Addition of an Accredited Toddler program) McLean, VA Meredith Wood & Thomas Le Grand, Heads of School MONTESSORI SCHOOL OF WAUKESHA (Initial Accreditation) Waukesha, WI William R. Walsh, Executive Director MONTESSORI SCHOOL OF WESTMINSTER (Initial Accreditation) Westminster, MD Jodi Lupco, Head of School SHINING STARS MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Initial Accreditation: Early Childhood and Lower Elementary levels) Washington, DC Regina Rodriguez, Executive Director

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Introducing the AMS Pathway of Continuous School Improvement

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 28, no. 4

Pages: 17

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: At the AMS 2016 Annual Conference (held last March, in Chicago), we shared the news that AMS is launching a new school-quality initiative, available to all member schools: the AMS Pathway of Continuous School Improvement.AMS offers free coaching by a personalized "school quality concierge," selfassessment resources, sample documents, and other materials to assist schools on the journey of continuous improvement. * Respectful.[...]unlike AMS school accreditation, which is a designation reserved for those AMS-member schools that have completed the rigorous process of validating their compliance with AMS accreditation standards, the pathway recognizes every participating school as being engaged in a standards-based process of improvement.The Pathway of Continuous School Improvement supports our member schools by providing a mechanism for articulating quality and direction for ongoing, self-paced, continuous improvement, with an ultimate goal of better serving our children.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Book

The Parent-Centered Early School: Highland Community School of Milwaukee

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

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Abstract/Notes: In May, 1991, the newly chosen Milwaukee Public Schools Superintendent, Dr. Ho,vard Fuller, visited Highland Community School. His main question to parents and staff assembled to greet him was, "What lessons can we public school people learn from you?" Highland people had cogent ideas to pass on to him. This book is a more formal response in which I hope the hundreds of people who have continuously created Highland in its first twenty-five years speak through me in answer to him and to his colleagues elsewhere in public education. Highland began in late 1968, and by 1994 was one of only ten schools in the entire country to qualify for state-financed vouchers to independent urban schools. It is small: about seventy ethnically and economically diverse students aged two-and-a-half to ten years, three teachers and three assistants, a full-time executive director, and three part-time helpers, including a parent coordinator. One of the teachers doubles as principal. Annual expenditures per pupil are about $2,800. The curriculum is Montessori-based. The building is a century-old mansion. The school is governed by a nine-member parent board of directors and helped, primarily in fund-raising, by an advisory group of trustees. It is located in Milwaukee's Near West Side, an economically depressed and violent neighborhood (Jeffrey Dahmer's apartment, since razed, was only five blocks from the school). This is the story of a small school. Faced with the vastness of urban decay and its impact on educational institutions, the reader might question whether describing and analyzing this diminutive organization has any relevance to urban education. Despite differences between it and stereotypical urban public schools, however, it brings a message to American education much more important than its size seems to warrant. Its size is precisely the point. Change nucleates and incubates in small settings. Our huge society conditions us to think in terms of large numbers, sweeping change, vast federal programs. Government may be able to create contexts for change, but the changes themselves have to be brought about where individuals assemble to meet their mutual needs. Whether their relationships will be harmonious and productive, or acrimonious and dysfunctional, depends on how the organization is structured and what spirit has been breathed into it. This book fleshes out the organizational and attitudinal reasons that Highland works so well and what public education can learn from this small inner-city educational oasis. As a framework for the organization of this study, let us first review factors that research has revealed make a school effective.

Language: English

Published: New York: Garland, 1997

Edition: 1st

ISBN: 978-1-315-05106-2

Series: Studies in Education and Culture , 10

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