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583 results

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Does Preschool Curriculum Make a Difference in Primary School Performance: Insights into the Variety of Preschool Activities and Their Effects on School Achievement and Behaviour in the Caribbean Island of Trinidad; Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal evidence

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Early Child Development and Care, vol. 103, no. 1

Pages: 27-42

Americas, Caribbean, Latin America and the Caribbean, Trinidad and Tobago

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Abstract/Notes: Preschool education is an important and much studied topic in developed countries, and of growing importance in the third world. Studies exploring preschool experience have noted positive effects when comparing children with access to preschool versus children without access, and effects of particular curriculum approaches over the length of primary schooling. This study adopts a focused sample, cross‐sectional design to explore the types of preschool experience available (denoted by types of preschool activities which equate broadly to curriculum approaches) and whether variation in preschool experience affects core curriculum (English, science, mathematics) performance and classroom behaviours throughout the years of primary schooling in Trinidad and when children complete their primary education in the form of a national ‘common entrance examination’ for entry into a stratified secondary school system. Results show that a large majority of the sampled children attended preschool and that most of the preschool experience was traditional and teacher centred. Neither child centred or teacher centred preschool activities affected academic performance in the core subjects during the primary school years or at the end of their primary school career. Type of preschool activity did affect teacher perception of behaviour in class. Child centred experience facilitated a social/peer orientation in children. High levels of teacher centred experience detracted from later relationships with teacher. Results were confounded by social class, with middle class children having most access to (the limited amount available) child centred preschool experience and performing at the highest academic and behavioural levels in the classroom although in limited numbers. The discussion questions the appropriacy of the various preschool activities for pupils within a cultural orientation of traditional upbringing and primary schooling practices.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/0300443941030103

ISSN: 0300-4430, 1476-8275

Article

Schoolakties - schoolakties - schoolakties

Available from: Stadsarchief Amsterdam (Amsterdam City Archives)

Publication: Montessori Opvoeding, no. 3

Pages: 50-52

Nederlandse Montessori Vereniging

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Language: Dutch

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

“My Name Is Sally Brown, and I Hate School!”: A Retrospective Study of School Liking Among Conventional and Montessori School Alumni

Available from: Wiley Online Library

Publication: Psychology in the Schools, vol. 60, no. 3

Pages: 541-565

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Abstract/Notes: School liking shows clear associations with academic success, yet we know little about how it changes over levels of schooling, what predicts liking school at each level, or how attending alternative schools like Montessori might impact liking. To better understand school liking across time and education settings, we surveyed adults about how much they remember liking elementary, middle, and high school, and identified key school features that predicted higher school liking at each level. Because Montessori schools have many features that other literature suggests predict higher school liking, we purposely sampled Montessori alumni as well, and compared their schools' features for elementary school only (due to sample size). Moreover, we collected open-ended responses about what participants in both conventional and Montessori liked least about school, revealing what features of their school experiences might have led to less overall school liking. The unique contributions of this study are (1) showing how a wide range of school features predict recalled school liking, (2) examining data for all school levels using a single sample of participants, and (3) comparing recalled school liking and its predictors across conventional and Montessori schools. The sample included 630 adults, of whom 436 were conventional school alumni and 187 were Montessori alumni (7 participants did not report school type). Participants' mean age was 35.8 years (SD = 10.53, range = 19–77), and 53% were female. Participants were recruited online, and they responded to Qualtrics surveys about school liking, school features, and their demographics. School liking overall was tepid, and was highest in elementary and lowest in middle school. For all participants, recalling a sense of community and interest in schoolwork were most strongly associated with school liking. Adults who attended schools which emphasized studying topics of personal interest and rewards for positive behavior also liked school more. Montessori school alumni reported higher school liking and that learning was what they liked most about school; by contrast, conventional school alumni most liked seeing friends. Levels of school liking, as recalled by adults, are low overall, but are higher in elementary school and higher amongst those who recall their schools as having stronger community, catering more to student interest, and rewarding positive behavior. In addition, school liking was higher among people who attended Montessori schools. Further research could extend to a cross-sectional study of children currently enrolled in different types of schools.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1002/pits.22777

ISSN: 0033-3085, 1520-6807

Book

Why an Ungraded Middle School. Chapter 1, How to Organize and Operate an Ungraded Middle School. Successful School Administration Series

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: Experience of the Liverpool Middle School, Liverpool, New York, provides a rationale for organizing school systems to include ungraded middle schools. If, as evidence indicates, today's youth are maturing earlier, are more sophisticated, and are capable of greater accomplishment, then the traditional grade 7-8-9 arrangement does not meet the needs of ninth grade students while elementary schools can not meet the needs of sixth grade students. It is felt that grouping students by grades 6, 7, and 8 in the middle school aided solution of this problem. By introducing a multi-age grouping of students for each subject, each student's unique qualities and individual capabilities were recognized and given full educational advantage. This ungraded system required curriculum reform and flexible scheduling which were implemented along with a system of team teaching. Problems of team isolation, friction within teams, curriculum oriented outlooks, unwillingness to regroup students, and lack of evaluation of innovations were being solved. Progress made with the middle school concept indicates its viability. (TT)

Language: English

Published: [S.I.]: Prentice-Hall, Inc, 1967

Article

Program Profiles [Clissold School, Chicago, Illinois; Bonneville Elementary School, Pocatello, Idaho; Reading Community School, Reading, Ohio]

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 1, no. 2

Pages: 9

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

A Class of Special Character [Montessori school-within-a-school, Arthur Street School, Dunedin]

Publication: Montessori NewZ, vol. 4

Pages: 9

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Language: English

Article

USA: Montessori-Pädagogik in der Grundschule: ein portrait der Butler School in Darnestown, Maryland, USA [USA: Montessori Education in Elementary School: a portrait of the Butler School in Darnestown, Maryland, USA]

Publication: Montessori: Zeitschrift für Montessori-Pädagogik, vol. 38, no. 3

Pages: 150-163

Americas, Montessori method of education, North America, United States of America

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Language: German

ISSN: 0944-2537

Conference Paper

Is There a Need for Handicraft in Preschool? Attitudes of Preschool Teachers and Parents on Including Handicraft Activities in the Regular Preschool Program

Available from: IATED Digital Library

INTED2020 14th International Technology, Education and Development Conference

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Abstract/Notes: Alternative educational concepts evolved in response to classical educational methods in which children are placed in a passive position and the transfer of knowledge is cultivated as a form of teaching. Models of alternative pedagogy (Montessori, Waldorf, Reggio, Agazzi) advocate developmentally appropriate practices which Bredekamp (1993) describes as a presence of different strategies, i.e., child-oriented behaviours of teachers and responding to the child's individual needs. In order to help each child to grow into a universal and competent individual from preschool age, it is necessary to encourage their imagination and creativity, as well as to acquire habits of cooperation and coexistence with other children. One of the activities which promote these desirable characteristics in children is handicraft. Many studies and findings in the area of neuroscience, multiple intelligences theories, and the aforementioned alternative pedagogical concepts emphasize the importance of handicraft and point out its benefits not only for children but for the entire community. However, such an approach to children's learning and activity is poorly represented in educational institutions. Therefore, the aim of the study was to examine the views of preschool teachers and parents on handicraft activities and its more frequent use in regular preschool programs. The survey was conducted by an anonymous questionnaire on a sample of 316 respondents, preschool teachers (N=141) and parents (N=175). The results of the study show that both preschool teachers and parents agree that certain elements of alternative concepts such as handicraft have a positive impact on the overall development of the child and that they are useful and practical life skills. They also agree that handicraft activities should be used in educational institutions to a greater extent. [Conference Name: 14th International Technology, Education and Development Conference; ISBN: 9788409179398; Place: Valencia, Spain]

Language: English

Published: Valencia, Spain: International Academy of Technology, Education and Development (IATED), 2020

Pages: 1511-1519

DOI: 10.21125/inted.2020.0499

ISBN: 978-84-09-17939-8

Article

Celebration Held at Château de Bures

Available from: Bibliothèque Nationale de France (BNF) - Gallica

Publication: The Paris Times (Paris, France)

Pages: 4

Château de Bures (Boarding school, Paris, France), Europe, France, Montessori schools, Prynce Hopkins - Biographic sources, Western Europe

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Language: English

Article

Une classe Montessori à Paris (part 1 of 2) [A Montessori class in Paris]

Available from: Université Caen Normandie

Publication: Pour l'ère nouvelle: revue internationale d'èducation nouvelle, vol. 7, no. 34

Pages: 3-6

Europe, France, Montessori method of education, Western Europe

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Language: French

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