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1577 results

Article

Does Preschool Curriculum Make a Difference in Primary School Performance: Insights into the Variety of Preschool Activities and Their Effects on School Achievement and Behaviour in the Caribbean Island of Trinidad; Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal evidence

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Early Child Development and Care, vol. 103, no. 1

Pages: 27-42

Americas, Caribbean, Latin America and the Caribbean, Trinidad and Tobago

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Abstract/Notes: Preschool education is an important and much studied topic in developed countries, and of growing importance in the third world. Studies exploring preschool experience have noted positive effects when comparing children with access to preschool versus children without access, and effects of particular curriculum approaches over the length of primary schooling. This study adopts a focused sample, cross‐sectional design to explore the types of preschool experience available (denoted by types of preschool activities which equate broadly to curriculum approaches) and whether variation in preschool experience affects core curriculum (English, science, mathematics) performance and classroom behaviours throughout the years of primary schooling in Trinidad and when children complete their primary education in the form of a national ‘common entrance examination’ for entry into a stratified secondary school system. Results show that a large majority of the sampled children attended preschool and that most of the preschool experience was traditional and teacher centred. Neither child centred or teacher centred preschool activities affected academic performance in the core subjects during the primary school years or at the end of their primary school career. Type of preschool activity did affect teacher perception of behaviour in class. Child centred experience facilitated a social/peer orientation in children. High levels of teacher centred experience detracted from later relationships with teacher. Results were confounded by social class, with middle class children having most access to (the limited amount available) child centred preschool experience and performing at the highest academic and behavioural levels in the classroom although in limited numbers. The discussion questions the appropriacy of the various preschool activities for pupils within a cultural orientation of traditional upbringing and primary schooling practices.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/0300443941030103

ISSN: 0300-4430, 1476-8275

Doctoral Dissertation

A Study of Pre-School Education in the Republic of Ireland with Particular Reference to Those Pre-Schools Which are Listed by the Irish Pre-School Playgroups Association in Cork City and County

Available from: British Librarty - EthOS

Comparative education, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Montessori method of education, Ireland, Montessori method of education, Northern Europe, Preschool education

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Abstract/Notes: This study was undertaken in order to investigate the activities which took place in Irish pre-schools other than those within the formal school system. The principle focus of the research concerned the degree to which the pre-school children were being 'cognitively stretched' by the curriculum in which they were engaged. The social, linguistic, physical and creative development of these children was also considered.An historical review of the theory of play and recent research in this area was undertaken.Twenty-three pre-schools were taken at random from the membership list in Cork city and county of the Irish Pre- School Playgroups Association. One pre-school which was not a member was added. Prior to embarking upon the study, a history of the I.P.P.A. was given.The ethnographic research strategy was found to be the most suitable method of assessing empirically the nature and frequency of play in the pre-school. This study, which took place between 1986 and 1990, was therefore eclectic in nature, employing a multi-faceted approach encompassing a target child observational schedule, interviews, a study of classrooms, a questionnaire and an interaction analysis system.Briefly, the results showed that the 157 children engaged in this study were being cognitively stretched for approximately one quarter of the time if they were in a playgroup and approximately one half of the time if they were in a Montessori setting. Social and linguistic behaviour was limited by the actions of the pre-school leaders and physically or creatively challenging behaviour was rarely observed. The fact that the children played alone for half of the total time spent in the pre-school was most striking.The most important finding to emerge from the study of language in the twenty-four pre-schools was the fact that the children rarely communicated verbally. Dialogue was almost non-existent and children's questions were very sparse. In order to place the above in a National context, a questionnaire was sent in 1990 to a random sample of one hundred I.P.P.A. members in the 26 counties of the Republic of Ireland. Unfortunately, only 39 responded. However, of note was that approximately 25% of playgroup leaders had degrees and four-fifths of them were mothers in their mid-thirties. They strongly disagreed with the teaching of the 3Rs and felt that much more government money should be devoted to playgroups and in-service training for their personnel.

Language: English

Published: Hull, England, 1993

Article

School Accreditation News

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 27, no. 4

Pages: 18

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Abstract/Notes: The AMS accreditation designation indicates that an AMS member school meets a well-defined standard of excellence.ACTON MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Initial Accreditation) Acton Darlene Paquette, Head of School THE BOYD SCHOOL (Reaccreditation) 7 campuses in Northern Virginia MaryAnn Boyd, Head of School ETON SCHOOL (Reaccreditation) Bellevue, WA Russell Smith, Head of School THE HOCKESSIN MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Reaccreditation) Hockessin, DE Janette Henry, Head of School MARIPOSA MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Initial Accreditation-Infant, Toddler, Early Childhood, and Lower Elementary levels) Austin, TX Whitney Falcon, Head of School MONTESSORI ACADEMY OF CHICAGO (Initial Accreditation) Chicago, IL Fosca White, Head of School MONTESSORI CHILDREN'S HOUSE OF AUBURN (Initial Accreditation) Auburn Kari Cafeo, Head of School NORTHGLADE MONTESSORI MAGNET SCHOOL (Reaccreditation) Kalamazoo, MI Dale Mogaji, Head of School SHREWSBURY MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Initial Accreditation) Shrewsbury Kari Cafeo, Head of School SUMMIT MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Initial Accreditation-Toddler, Early Childhood, and Lower Elementary levels) Framingham Martha Torrence, Head of School THE VILLAGE SCHOOL (Reaccreditation) Waldwick, NJ Marilyn Larkin, Head of School WEST SIDE MONTESSORI (Reaccreditation) Toledo, OH Lynn Fisher, Head of School WOODINVILLE MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Reaccreditation) Bothell, WA Mary Schneider, Head of School WYOMING VALLEY MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Reaccreditation) Kingston, PA Dennis Puhalla, Head of School

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Book Section

Margaret Naumburg: Montessorian, Walden School, Progressive Educator

Available from: Springer Link

Book Title: America's Early Montessorians: Anne George, Margaret Naumburg, Helen Parkhurst and Adelia Pyle

Pages: 217-263

Americas, Margaret Naumburg - Biographic sources, North America, United States of America, Walden School (New York City, 1914-1988)

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Abstract/Notes: After completing her training in 1913, Margaret Naumburg, in her lectures and articles, portrayed a highly emotional and romanticized image of Maria Montessori. Naumburg established several Montessori schools in New York City: at the Henry Street Settlement in 1913; at the Leete School from 1914 to 1916; and in the New York public school system in 1915. Stymied by bureaucracy and inadequate funding, she abandoned her public school experiment. Moving from Montessorian principles, Naumburg identified increasingly with child-centered Progressive education but added a dimension from Jung’s Analytic Psychology which emphasized children’s need to free their emotions through imaginative, creative self-expression through art. She founded her own “Children’s School” in 1916 in New York City, subsequently renamed the Walden School. She is also famous for developing dynamically oriented Art Therapy.

Language: English

Published: Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan, 2020

ISBN: 978-3-030-54835-3

Series: Historical Studies in Education

Article

Educational Intelligence; Middle Atlantic States; New York; New York City

Available from: HathiTrust

Publication: American Primary Teacher, vol. 31, no. 2

Pages: 78

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Language: English

Article

Montessori, Si [Escuela Hispana Montessori, New York City, New York]

Publication: Montessori Review, vol. 2, no. 1

Pages: 12-13, 15

⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

Article

New Montessori Center in New York [Children's Montessori Center, Stony Brook, New York]

Publication: Montessori Observer, vol. 5, no. 6

Pages: 4

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Language: English

ISSN: 0889-5643

Doctoral Dissertation

Balancing Act: Race and the Kansas City, Missouri Public Schools, 1949–1999

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: Public school integration has been a wrenching process in a number of American cities during the last half of the twentieth century. In few cities, however, has the process been so heavily litigated, so rife with controversy, so costly, so lengthy, or, ultimately, yielded results so mixed as in Kansas City, Missouri. This dissertation analyzes the troubled course of integration in the Kansas City public schools and the numerous forces that influenced that course. In short, this dissertation is a case study of one district's struggle to formulate an integrated school system and the manner in which changing legal standards, shifting demographic patterns, pressure from various community groups, financial limitations, and other political considerations have shaped public policy choices regarding integration in the Kansas City schools. During the fifty year period between 1949 and 1999, racial issues have figured prominently, and at times dominated, the policy making process in the Kansas City schools. In 1955 the city's public schools were integrated, but the extent of integration produced by the initial desegregation plan failed to satisfy the black community and the district faced several lawsuits seeking additional steps to promote integration. The paucity of integration in the Kansas City schools also drew criticism from the United States Department of Health, Education and Welfare. In the mid-1970s, under pressure from HEW, school officials in Kansas City initiated a busing plan that produced more extensive integration. However, by the mid-1980s, the school district was again a defendant in a desegregation suit. The school district was found liable for the vestiges of segregation that remained in the public schools and a sweeping remedy was ordered by the court. in a series of rulings announced in the mid-1980s, the district court approved a remedy providing for educational enhancements, massive improvements to the district's schools, and the establishment of the nation's most expansive and expensive magnet schools system for purposes of integration. The magnet plan, however, failed to meet the ambitious goals established by the district court, and the remedy was continually attacked in the courts by the state of Missouri and disgruntled taxpayers. In 1995, the United States Supreme Court overturned much of the remedy and four years later the case was dismissed.

Language: English

Published: Manhattan, Kansas, 2000

Article

New Zealand Theosophists in “New Education” networks, 1880s-1938

Available from: Emerald Insight

Publication: History of Education Review, vol. 46, no. 1

Pages: 42-57

Asia, Australasia, Australia and New Zealand, India, Montessori method of education, New Education Fellowship, New Education Movement, New Zealand, Oceania, South Asia, Theosophical Society, Theosophy

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Abstract/Notes: Purpose It is well-known that Beatrice Ensor, who founded the New Education Fellowship (NEF) in 1921, was a Theosophist and that from 1915 the Theosophical Fraternity in Education she established laid the foundations for the NEF. However, little research has been performed on the Fraternity itself. The travels of Theosophists, texts, money and ideas between Auckland, India and London from the late nineteenth century offer insights into “New Education” networking in the British Commonwealth more broadly. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach This paper draws on archival documents from the Adyar Library and Research Centre, International Theosophical Society (TS) headquarters, Chennai, India; the archive at the headquarters of the New Zealand Section of the TS, Epsom, Auckland; the NEF files at the archive of the London Institute of Education; papers past digital newspaper archive. Findings New Zealand’s first affiliated NEF group was set up by the principal of the Vasanta Gardens Theosophical School, Epsom, in 1933. She was also involved in the New Zealand Section of the Theosophical Fraternity, which held conferences from 1917 to 1927. New Zealand’s Fraternity and Theosophical Education Trust had close links with their counterparts in England and India. The setting up of New Zealand’s first NEF group was enabled by networks created between Theosophists in New Zealand, India and England from the late nineteenth century. Originality/value The contribution of Theosophists to the new education movement has received little attention internationally. Theosophical educational theory and Theosophists’ contributions to New Zealand Education have not previously been studied. Combining transnational historiography with critical geography, this case study of networks between New Zealand, Adyar (India) and London lays groundwork for a wider “spatial history” of Theosophy and new education.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1108/HER-10-2015-0024

ISSN: 0819-8691

Article

School Accreditation News

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 28, no. 2

Pages: 19

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Abstract/Notes: AMS accreditation is a designation that an AMS member school meets a well-defined standard of excellence.AMARE MONTESSORI (SATELLITE OF MONTESSORI ACADEMY) (Initial Accreditation) Clarksville, TN Jaime Yeager, Head of School BRIXHAM MONTESSORI FRIENDS SCHOOL (Initial Accreditation) York, ME Alica B. Johnson-Grafe, Head of School CHILDREN'S TREE MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Initial Accreditation) Old Saybrook, Connecticut Marci Martindale, Head of School COUNTRYSIDE MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Reaccreditation) Charlotte, NC Dolores Murgolo, Interim Head of School HILL COUNTRY MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Reaccreditation) Boerne, TX Steven Whewell, Head of School KENNEBEC MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Reaccreditation) Fairfield, ME Rebecca Green, Head of School MONTESSORI ACADEMY (Addition of an Accredited Infant Program) Brentwood, TN James R. Bernstorf, Head of School MONTESSORI ACADEMY OF ARLINGTON (Addition of an Accredited Infant Program) Arlington, TX Pamela Dunbar, Head of School MONTESSORI SCHOOL OF MCLEAN (Addition of an Accredited Toddler program) McLean, VA Meredith Wood & Thomas Le Grand, Heads of School MONTESSORI SCHOOL OF WAUKESHA (Initial Accreditation) Waukesha, WI William R. Walsh, Executive Director MONTESSORI SCHOOL OF WESTMINSTER (Initial Accreditation) Westminster, MD Jodi Lupco, Head of School SHINING STARS MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Initial Accreditation: Early Childhood and Lower Elementary levels) Washington, DC Regina Rodriguez, Executive Director

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

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