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Book

Why an Ungraded Middle School. Chapter 1, How to Organize and Operate an Ungraded Middle School. Successful School Administration Series

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: Experience of the Liverpool Middle School, Liverpool, New York, provides a rationale for organizing school systems to include ungraded middle schools. If, as evidence indicates, today's youth are maturing earlier, are more sophisticated, and are capable of greater accomplishment, then the traditional grade 7-8-9 arrangement does not meet the needs of ninth grade students while elementary schools can not meet the needs of sixth grade students. It is felt that grouping students by grades 6, 7, and 8 in the middle school aided solution of this problem. By introducing a multi-age grouping of students for each subject, each student's unique qualities and individual capabilities were recognized and given full educational advantage. This ungraded system required curriculum reform and flexible scheduling which were implemented along with a system of team teaching. Problems of team isolation, friction within teams, curriculum oriented outlooks, unwillingness to regroup students, and lack of evaluation of innovations were being solved. Progress made with the middle school concept indicates its viability. (TT)

Language: English

Published: [S.I.]: Prentice-Hall, Inc, 1967

Article

A Class of Special Character [Montessori school-within-a-school, Arthur Street School, Dunedin]

Publication: Montessori NewZ, vol. 4

Pages: 9

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Language: English

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

"My Name Is Sally Brown, and I Hate School!": A Retrospective Study of School Liking Among Conventional and Montessori School Alumni

Available from: Wiley Online Library

Publication: Psychology in the Schools, vol. 60, no. 3

Pages: 541-565

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Abstract/Notes: School liking shows clear associations with academic success, yet we know little about how it changes over levels of schooling, what predicts liking school at each level, or how attending alternative schools like Montessori might impact liking. To better understand school liking across time and education settings, we surveyed adults about how much they remember liking elementary, middle, and high school, and identified key school features that predicted higher school liking at each level. Because Montessori schools have many features that other literature suggests predict higher school liking, we purposely sampled Montessori alumni as well, and compared their schools' features for elementary school only (due to sample size). Moreover, we collected open-ended responses about what participants in both conventional and Montessori liked least about school, revealing what features of their school experiences might have led to less overall school liking. The unique contributions of this study are (1) showing how a wide range of school features predict recalled school liking, (2) examining data for all school levels using a single sample of participants, and (3) comparing recalled school liking and its predictors across conventional and Montessori schools. The sample included 630 adults, of whom 436 were conventional school alumni and 187 were Montessori alumni (7 participants did not report school type). Participants' mean age was 35.8 years (SD = 10.53, range = 19–77), and 53% were female. Participants were recruited online, and they responded to Qualtrics surveys about school liking, school features, and their demographics. School liking overall was tepid, and was highest in elementary and lowest in middle school. For all participants, recalling a sense of community and interest in schoolwork were most strongly associated with school liking. Adults who attended schools which emphasized studying topics of personal interest and rewards for positive behavior also liked school more. Montessori school alumni reported higher school liking and that learning was what they liked most about school; by contrast, conventional school alumni most liked seeing friends. Levels of school liking, as recalled by adults, are low overall, but are higher in elementary school and higher amongst those who recall their schools as having stronger community, catering more to student interest, and rewarding positive behavior. In addition, school liking was higher among people who attended Montessori schools. Further research could extend to a cross-sectional study of children currently enrolled in different types of schools.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1002/pits.22777

ISSN: 0033-3085, 1520-6807

Article

USA: Montessori-Pädagogik in der Grundschule: ein portrait der Butler School in Darnestown, Maryland, USA [USA: Montessori Education in Elementary School: a portrait of the Butler School in Darnestown, Maryland, USA]

Publication: Montessori: Zeitschrift für Montessori-Pädagogik, vol. 38, no. 3

Pages: 150-163

Americas, Montessori method of education, North America, United States of America

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Language: German

ISSN: 0944-2537

Article

Primary Schools [Stepping Stones, North Western, Southside Primary School, Forestville Montessori School]

Publication: Montessori Matters, no. 1

Pages: 7

Australasia, Australia, Australia and New Zealand, Montessori schools, Oceania

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Language: English

Article

Program Profiles [Clissold School, Chicago, Illinois; Bonneville Elementary School, Pocatello, Idaho; Reading Community School, Reading, Ohio]

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 1, no. 2

Pages: 9

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

Schoolakties - schoolakties - schoolakties

Available from: Stadsarchief Amsterdam (Amsterdam City Archives)

Publication: Montessori Opvoeding, no. 3

Pages: 50-52

Nederlandse Montessori Vereniging

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Language: Dutch

Book Section

Margaret Naumburg and the Walden School

Available from: Springer Link

Book Title: Founding Mothers and Others: Women Educational Leaders During the Progressive Era

Pages: 37-59

Americas, Margaret Naumburg - Biographic sources, North America, United States of America, Walden School (New York City, 1914-1988)

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Abstract/Notes: Margaret Naumburg was the charismatic and forceful founder of Waiden School in New York City. She went on to become an acknowledged leader in the “new school” movement, and later, the founder of art therapy in the United States. As art educator Judith Rubin says in her memorial tribute, “had she done nothing more than to found the Waiden School (1914), a place where freedom and discipline in all of the arts were fostered and were considered central to normal children’s healthy development… Dayenu! (‘It would have been enough!’).”1 This chapter examines Margaret Naumburgs life and times, her educational philosophy and its implementation in the Children’s School (Waiden School), and her leadership qualities and style.

Language: English

Published: New York: Palgrave Macmillan US, 2002

ISBN: 978-1-137-05475-3

Doctoral Dissertation

A institucionalização do método Montessori no campo educacional brasileiro (1914-1952) [Institutionalization of the Montessori method in the Brazilian educational field (1914-1952)]

Available from: Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina

Americas, Brazil, Latin America and the Caribbean, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - History, South America

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori established, in 1907, in Rome, a public school to children at risk, The Casa dei Bambini, which since then preserve the Montessori method characteristics, advocating the integral education based on freedom, action and on the individuality. For approximately four decades, Montessori researched about Children development, whose results were spread abroad, defining practices and innovative educational thoughts grounded on the relationship between teacher, the student and the learning environment advancing peace, self-education, self-correction with autonomy in sight, mutual respect, critic and the scientific spirit. The Objective of this study is the Montessori method establishment in Brazil, on the chronologic aspect along the first five decades from the last century. It?s a biographical research and documentary with a historical focus. The analysis is grounded in Certeau (2014), Chartier(2010) e Magalhães(2004). Objective: Recognize the formulation of the Montessori method in projects of its establishment in Brazil between 1914-1952; To Problematize political conditions, social, economical and cultural to set up the Montessori method in Brazil and its Educational applicability, questioning the reductionist mode relating to its use as specific materials and its adequate child-sized furniture. It has been verified that The First Montessori-based in Brazil served the children?s audience, in São Paulo, in the year of 1915, coming from the American strand, in a private enterprise of Ciridião Buarque e Mary Buarque. Such pedagogy irradiated by the mediation of these appropriation and representations made by teachers of the Escola Normal da Praça. São Paulo possessed, since 1924, laws that indicated the use of Montessori and Froebel?s course-ware, mas in a inarticulate way to the pedagogical principles. In Paraná, the Montessori-based education was established in the child education legislation in 1915 and investments were performed in 1924, when Lysímaco Costa acquired the ?montesorri layettes? to 4 Kindergarden. In Curitiba, in 1927, at the First National Conference of The Brazilian Association of Education (ABE), were presented thesis with Montessori bases. Still in Paraná, at the end of 40s, the method utilization occurred in the public education in the Preschool Program and Primary School and in 1952 was opened in Curitiba The Rural Montessori Experimental School to primary school, by the enterprise of Eny Caldeira.Piper Borges de Lacerda and Eny Caldeira speeches, whom realized in 1950 a course with Montessori in Perugia.In 1927, in Bahia, were realized vacation courses to teachers complementary training which were disseminated by the teacher of the Normal School of Salvador the Montessori concepts and the course-ware new meanings to the child education such as primary education. The matters discussed in these courses were spread by pedagogical magazines. In 1924, Alípio Franca translated The Method of Scientific Pedagogy applied to the Child Education at the Boys? House. In Rio de Janeiro, course-wares and parts of Montessori method were spread to Children education by education law, in 1921 and in 1929. Evidences of the Montessori use in perspective non-restricted to materials were found in children radio shows performed by Mary Buarque, in São Paulo, from 1936, whereupon self-education, the independence, the knowledge of child development phases, the singers freedom movement and the minimal intervention of the adult tutor made part of the proposal. In a mystic perspective, there was a link with the method and the social and theosophic assistance, in the 50 decade, disseminating in Rio de Janeiro and Paraná, by Piper Lacerda Borges and his husband. In the reuse given to the Agostinho da Silva method, also in the 1950, were present in the some universities creations, such as the Federal University of Santa Catarina as well from Paraíba and The University of Brasilia. Concluded that between 1914 and 1952, the establishment process of the Montessori method in Brazil was lead by several different individuals, from different parts of the country, with appropriations and personal representations. / Montessori constituiu, em 1907, em Roma, uma escola pública para crianças em situação de risco, a Casa dei Bambini, embasada numa educação integral alicerçada na liberdade, na atividade e na individualidade. Durante aproximadamente quatro décadas, Montessori realizou pesquisas sobre o desenvolvimento infantil, cujos resultados foram difundidos transnacionalmente, configurando práticas e pensamento educacional inovadores fundamentados na relação entre o professor, o aluno e um ambiente de aprendizagem promotor da paz, da autoeducação, da autonomia, do respeito ao outro e do espírito científico e crítico. Com isso, também empreendeu uma didática para professores e a venda em série dos materiais que idealizou. O objeto desta narrativa historiográfica respaldada em Certeau (2014), Chartier (2010) e Magalhães (2004) foi a institucionalização do Método Montessori no Brasil, no âmbito cronológico das cinco primeiras décadas do século passado. Objetivou: reconhecer as formulações teóricas que permitiram identificar a origem do Método Montessori e cotejá-las com os projetos brasileiros desenvolvidos entre 1914-1952 apontando permanências e contribuições à educação brasileira; historicizar o processo de institucionalização da Pedagogia montessoriana no Brasil; problematizar a sua forma de apropriação na Educação Infantil e Ensino Primário, identificando por que o método é relacionado principalmente ao uso de materiais didáticos específicos e de mobiliário adequado ao tamanho das crianças. Foi constatado que a primeira escola montessoriana no Brasil, proveniente da vertente educacional estadunidense, atendeu ao público infantil, em São Paulo, no ano de 1915, num investimento particular de Ciridião Buarque e Mary Buarque. Esta pedagogia se irradiou por intermédio das apropriações realizadas pelos docentes da Escola Normal da Praça, em São Paulo, estado que possuía, desde 1924, legislação que indicava o uso de materiais didáticos de Montessori e de Froebel, mas de forma desarticulada dos princípios pedagógicos. No Paraná, a educação montessoriana foi institucionalizada na legislação educacional da Pré-escola em 1915 e investimentos foram realizados em 1924, quando Lysímaco Costa adquiriu os ?enxovais montessorianos? para quatro Jardins de Infância. Em Curitiba, em 1927, durante a Primeira Conferência Nacional da Associação Brasileira de Educação (ABE) foram apresentadas teses com base montessoriana. Ainda no Paraná, no final da década de 1940, a utilização do método ocorreu no ensino público no Programa da Pré-escola e do Ensino Primário e em 1952 foi inaugurada a Escola Experimental Montessoriana Rural para crianças do Ensino Primário, por iniciativa de Eny Caldeira. Ela e Piper de Lacerda Borges, presidente da Associação Montessori do Brasil, fizeram curso com Montessori, na Itália, em 1951. Já na Bahia, em 1927, efetivaram-se cursos de férias para formação de professores durante os quais foram disseminadas pelos docentes da Escola Normal de Salvador concepções montessorianas e a ressignificação dos materiais, tanto para a Pré-escola como para o Ensino Primário. O teor destes cursos foi divulgado por revistas pedagógicas. No mesmo local, em 1924, Alípio Franca traduziu o Livro Pedagogia Científica. No Rio de Janeiro, materiais e frações do método montessoriano se disseminaram para a Educação Infantil por meio da legislação educacional, em 1921 e em 1929. Evidências da utilização do Método Montessori em perspectiva não restrita ao uso de materiais didáticos foram encontradas nos programas infantis radiofônicos realizados por Mary Buarque, em São Paulo, a partir de 1936; no vínculo do método com a assistência social e teosófica, na década de 1950, disseminado por Piper de Lacerda Borges; no reuso dado ao método pelo lusitano Agostinho da Silva, também nos anos 1950, na criação de algumas universidades. Conclui-se que, entre 1914 e 1952, o processo de institucionalização do método Montessori no Brasil foi capitaneado por diversos sujeitos, em diferentes lugares do país, com apropriações e representações.

Language: Portuguese

Published: Florianópolis, Brazil, 2017

Doctoral Dissertation

A institucionalização do método Montessori no campo educacional brasileiro (1914-1952) [The institutionalization of the Montessori method in the Brazilian educational field (1914-1952)]

Available from: Federal University of Santa Catarina - Institutional Repository

Americas, Brazil, Latin America and the Caribbean, Montessori method of education - History, South America

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori constituiu, em 1907, em Roma, uma escola pública para crianças em situação de risco, a Casa dei Bambini, embasada numa educação integral alicerçada na liberdade, na atividade e na individualidade. Durante aproximadamente quatro décadas, Montessori realizou pesquisas sobre o desenvolvimento infantil, cujos resultados foram difundidos transnacionalmente, configurando práticas e pensamento educacional inovadores fundamentados na relação entre o professor, o aluno e um ambiente de aprendizagem promotor da paz, da autoeducação, da autonomia, do respeito ao outro e do espírito científico e crítico. Com isso, também empreendeu uma didática para professores e a venda em série dos materiais que idealizou. O objeto desta narrativa historiográfica respaldada em Certeau (2014), Chartier (2010) e Magalhães (2004) foi a institucionalização do Método Montessori no Brasil, no âmbito cronológico das cinco primeiras décadas do século passado. Objetivou: reconhecer as formulações teóricas que permitiram identificar a origem do Método Montessori e cotejá-las com os projetos brasileiros desenvolvidos entre 1914-1952 apontando permanências e contribuições à educação brasileira; historicizar o processo de institucionalização da Pedagogia montessoriana no Brasil; problematizar a sua forma de apropriação na Educação Infantil e Ensino Primário, identificando por que o método é relacionado principalmente ao uso de materiais didáticos específicos e de mobiliário adequado ao tamanho das crianças. Foi constatado que a primeira escola montessoriana no Brasil, proveniente da vertente educacional estadunidense, atendeu ao público infantil, em São Paulo, no ano de 1915, num investimento particular de Ciridião Buarque e Mary Buarque. Esta pedagogia se irradiou por intermédio das apropriações realizadas pelos docentes da Escola Normal da Praça, em São Paulo, estado que possuía, desde 1924, legislação que indicava o uso de materiais didáticos de Montessori e de Froebel, mas de forma desarticulada dos princípios pedagógicos. No Paraná, a educação montessoriana foi institucionalizada na legislação educacional da Pré-escola em 1915 e investimentos foram realizados em 1924, quando Lysímaco Costa adquiriu os ?enxovais montessorianos? para quatro Jardins de Infância. Em Curitiba, em 1927, durante a Primeira Conferência Nacional da Associação Brasileira de Educação (ABE) foram apresentadas teses com base montessoriana. Ainda no Paraná, no final da década de 1940, a utilização do método ocorreu no ensino público no Programa da Pré-escola e do Ensino Primário e em 1952 foi inaugurada a Escola Experimental Montessoriana Rural para crianças do Ensino Primário, por iniciativa de Eny Caldeira. Ela e Piper de Lacerda Borges, presidente da Associação Montessori do Brasil, fizeram curso com Montessori, na Itália, em 1951. Já na Bahia, em 1927, efetivaram-se cursos de férias para formação de professores durante os quais foram disseminadas pelos docentes da Escola Normal de Salvador concepções montessorianas e a ressignificação dos materiais, tanto para a Pré-escola como para o Ensino Primário. O teor destes cursos foi divulgado por revistas pedagógicas. No mesmo local, em 1924, Alípio Franca traduziu o Livro Pedagogia Científica. No Rio de Janeiro, materiais e frações do método montessoriano se disseminaram para a Educação Infantil por meio da legislação educacional, em 1921 e em 1929. Evidências da utilização do Método Montessori em perspectiva não restrita ao uso de materiais didáticos foram encontradas nos programas infantis radiofônicos realizados por Mary Buarque, em São Paulo, a partir de 1936; no vínculo do método com a assistência social e teosófica, na década de 1950, disseminado por Piper de Lacerda Borges; no reuso dado ao método pelo lusitano Agostinho da Silva, também nos anos 1950, na criação de algumas universidades. Conclui-se que, entre 1914 e 1952, o processo de institucionalização do método Montessori no Brasil foi capitaneado por diversos sujeitos, em diferentes lugares do país, com apropriações e representações. [Abstract : Montessori established, in 1907, in Rome, a public school to children at risk, The Casa dei Bambini, which since then preserve the Montessori method characteristics, advocating the integral education based on freedom, action and on the individuality. For approximately four decades, Montessori researched about Children development, whose results were spread abroad, defining practices and innovative educational thoughts grounded on the relationship between teacher, the student and the learning environment advancing peace, self-education, self-correction with autonomy in sight, mutual respect, critic and the scientific spirit. The Objective of this study is the Montessori method establishment in Brazil, on the chronologic aspect along the first five decades from the last century. It?s a biographical research and documentary with a historical focus. The analysis is grounded in Certeau (2014), Chartier(2010) e Magalhães(2004). Objective: Recognize the formulation of the Montessori method in projects of its establishment in Brazil between 1914-1952; To Problematize political conditions, social, economical and cultural to set up the Montessori method in Brazil and its Educational applicability, questioning the reductionist mode relating to its use as specific materials and its adequate child-sized furniture. It has been verified that The First Montessori-based in Brazil served the children?s audience, in São Paulo, in the year of 1915, coming from the American strand, in a private enterprise of Ciridião Buarque e Mary Buarque. Such pedagogy irradiated by the mediation of these appropriation and representations made by teachers of the Escola Normal da Praça. São Paulo possessed, since 1924, laws that indicated the use of Montessori and Froebel?s course-ware, mas in a inarticulate way to the pedagogical principles. In Paraná, the Montessori-based education was established in the child education legislation in 1915 and investments were performed in 1924, when Lysímaco Costa acquired the ?montesorri layettes? to 4 Kindergarden. In Curitiba, in 1927, at the First National Conference of The Brazilian Association of Education (ABE), were presented thesis with Montessori bases. Still in Paraná, at the end of 40s, the method utilization occurred in the public education in the Preschool Program and Primary School and in 1952 was opened in Curitiba The Rural Montessori Experimental School to primary school, by the enterprise of Eny Caldeira.Piper Borges de Lacerda and Eny Caldeira speeches, whom realized in 1950 a course with Montessori in Perugia.In 1927, in Bahia, were realized vacation courses to teachers complementary training which were disseminated by the teacher of the Normal School of Salvador the Montessori concepts and the course-ware new meanings to the child education such as primary education. The matters discussed in these courses were spread by pedagogical magazines. In 1924, Alípio Franca translated The Method of Scientific Pedagogy applied to the Child Education at the Boys? House. In Rio de Janeiro, course-wares and parts of Montessori method were spread to Children education by education law, in 1921 and in 1929. Evidences of the Montessori use in perspective non-restricted to materials were found in children radio shows performed by Mary Buarque, in São Paulo, from 1936, whereupon self-education, the independence, the knowledge of child development phases, the singers freedom movement and the minimal intervention of the adult tutor made part of the proposal. In a mystic perspective, there was a link with the method and the social and theosophic assistance, in the 50 decade, disseminating in Rio de Janeiro and Paraná, by Piper Lacerda Borges and his husband. In the reuse given to the Agostinho da Silva method, also in the 1950, were present in the some universities creations, such as the Federal University of Santa Catarina as well from Paraíba and The University of Brasilia. Concluded that between 1914 and 1952, the establishment process of the Montessori method in Brazil was lead by several different individuals, from different parts of the country, with appropriations and personal representations.]

Language: Portuguese

Published: Florianópolis, Brazil, 2017

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