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1202 results

Article

Welcome to the New Year, the New Century, the New Millennium

Publication: Montessori NewZ, vol. 17

Pages: 7

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Language: English

Article

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A New Education for a New Era: The Contribution of the Conferences of the New Education Fellowship to the Disciplinary Field of Education 1921–1938

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Paedagogica Historica: International Journal of the History of Education, vol. 40, no. 5-6

Pages: 733-755

New Education Fellowship, New Education Movement, Theosophical Society, Theosophy

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Abstract/Notes: This article examines the role played by the conferences of the New Education Fellowship (NEF) in the emerging disciplinary field of the sciences of education between the two world wars. As Fuchs points out in an article in the present issue, the field of education at this time was being internationalized, and, being an international movement, the field impacted on by the NEF was international in scope.1 As will be seen, the ideas and practices of the new education were mediated by national cultural differences and thus their impact on the disciplinary field varied from nation to nation.2 In addition, the development of the field in terms of journals, conferences and its institutionalization within nations was uneven, which presents further difficulties when trying to evaluate the impact of the NEF's conferences. Much of the following discussion focuses on their impact on the disciplinary field in England though, as will be seen, not exclusively so. One of the distinguishing features of the NEF other than its international scope was that it was a movement that connected lay enthusiasts for the educational reforms associated with the new education with major figures in the developing disciplines of psychology and education, such as Carl Gustav Jung, Jean Piaget and John Dewey. The relation between these lay and professional constituencies is examined and conclusions drawn regarding the professionalizing process in the field and the impact of the conferences on educational research and its institutionalization.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/0030923042000293742

ISSN: 0030-9230, 1477-674X

Archival Material Or Collection

Box 11, Folder 50 - Manuscript Fragments, n.d. - "The New Children - A Miracle in Education / "The New Children - or - New Method"

Available from: Seattle University

Edwin Mortimer Standing - Biographic sources, Edwin Mortimer Standing - Writings

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Language: English

Archive: Seattle University, Lemieux Library and McGoldrick Learning Commons, Special Collections

Conference Paper

America's Alternative Schools: Prototypes for New Public Schools

Available from: ERIC

Annual Meeting of the University Council for Educational Administration (Houston, Texas, October 29-31, 1993)

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Abstract/Notes: As prototypes for new forms of education, public and private alternative schools have much to offer regular schools in the way of new ideas. This paper provides an overview of alternative schools and the options available. Alternative schools are characterized by a more selected student body, a smaller and less bureaucratic structure, values derived from within the school community, holistic student work, and a recognition of the school-survival issue. The basic educational frameworks within the array of public alternative school options are identified: (1) the traditional approach; (2) the nontraditional and nongraded approach; (3) schools that focus on the development of student abilities; (4) schools that emphasize techniques for delivering education (rather than philosophy); (5) schools with community-based organizing principles; (6) the self-directed, Montessori-like environment; (7) schools that are intentionally structured for particular student groups; and (8) subcontracted arrangements. In conclusion, alternative schools are flexible and able to respond to students' various needs. (LMI)

Language: English

Published: Houston, Texas: University Council for Educational Administration, Oct 1993

Pages: 19 p.

Article

To Transform a School: Turning Dreams into Reality [New Gate School, Sarasota, FL]

Publication: Tomorrow's Child, vol. 6, no. 3

Pages: 5–11

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

Agency and School News; Montessori Method at the Tulalip School

Available from: National Archives (USA)

Publication: Indian School Journal, vol. 13, no. 1

Pages: 26

Americas, Indigenous communities, Indigenous peoples, North America, Tulalip School (Washington), United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This is an excerpt from the Everett (Wash.) Herald.

Language: English

ISSN: 0364-7056

Article

Montessori School in New Brunswick, Canada [Fredericton Montessori School]

Publication: Montessori Observer, vol. 19, no. 1

Pages: 1

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Language: English

ISSN: 0889-5643

Article

Secondary School in Wind: New Wa Ora Principal "Optimistic" [Wa Ora Montessori School, Lower Hutt]

Publication: Montessori NewZ, vol. 10

Pages: 1–2

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Language: English

Article

A New Home for the Montessori Foundation and Our Future Lab School: The Field School

Publication: Tomorrow's Child, vol. 16, no. 1

Pages: 4

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Conference Paper

Is There a Need for Handicraft in Preschool? Attitudes of Preschool Teachers and Parents on Including Handicraft Activities in the Regular Preschool Program

Available from: IATED Digital Library

INTED2020 14th International Technology, Education and Development Conference

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Abstract/Notes: Alternative educational concepts evolved in response to classical educational methods in which children are placed in a passive position and the transfer of knowledge is cultivated as a form of teaching. Models of alternative pedagogy (Montessori, Waldorf, Reggio, Agazzi) advocate developmentally appropriate practices which Bredekamp (1993) describes as a presence of different strategies, i.e., child-oriented behaviours of teachers and responding to the child's individual needs. In order to help each child to grow into a universal and competent individual from preschool age, it is necessary to encourage their imagination and creativity, as well as to acquire habits of cooperation and coexistence with other children. One of the activities which promote these desirable characteristics in children is handicraft. Many studies and findings in the area of neuroscience, multiple intelligences theories, and the aforementioned alternative pedagogical concepts emphasize the importance of handicraft and point out its benefits not only for children but for the entire community. However, such an approach to children's learning and activity is poorly represented in educational institutions. Therefore, the aim of the study was to examine the views of preschool teachers and parents on handicraft activities and its more frequent use in regular preschool programs. The survey was conducted by an anonymous questionnaire on a sample of 316 respondents, preschool teachers (N=141) and parents (N=175). The results of the study show that both preschool teachers and parents agree that certain elements of alternative concepts such as handicraft have a positive impact on the overall development of the child and that they are useful and practical life skills. They also agree that handicraft activities should be used in educational institutions to a greater extent. [Conference Name: 14th International Technology, Education and Development Conference; ISBN: 9788409179398; Place: Valencia, Spain]

Language: English

Published: Valencia, Spain: International Academy of Technology, Education and Development (IATED), 2020

Pages: 1511-1519

DOI: 10.21125/inted.2020.0499

ISBN: 978-84-09-17939-8

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