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1370 results

Doctoral Dissertation

The Montessori Method in America: Montessori Schools in New York and Rhode Island from 1910-1940

Available from: Loyola University Chicago

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Abstract/Notes: During the very early twentieth century, Dr. Maria Montessori produced a pedagogical approach that permitted the developmental delayed, socioeconomically disadvantaged, and the youngest of children to advance their cognition and adaptive skills to conventional standards. Her renowned "Montessori Method" was unleashed in 1906 in her home country of Italy and found its way to the shore of the United States soon after. This research will compare the implementation of the Montessori Method in two states, Rhode Island and New York. Both states invested time and money into the instructional ideals of Dr. Montessori in response to the advice of educators and, as is frequently overlooked in the scholarly literature, at the request of parents and community organizations. This study will focus on policy implementation: the how and the who, and on the overall growth and decline of Montessori programs, concentrating on the role parents played.

Language: English

Published: Chicago, Illinois, 2011

Article

Time for School: After Montessori, Part 1

Publication: Montessori International, vol. 69

Pages: 3, 5

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Language: English

ISSN: 1470-8647

Article

Anniversary and Nature Trail Dedication [Eton School, Bellevue, Washington]

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 23, no. 3

Pages: 8

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Language: English

Article

Childhood's Promised Land: Montessori Children Ages 9-12 [Lake Country School, Minneapolis, MN]

Publication: NAMTA Quarterly, vol. 8, no. 2

Pages: 22-31

North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals

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Language: English

Article

2006 Whole School Refresher Course–Feedback from Participants

Publication: The Alcove: Newsletter of the Australian AMI Alumni Association, no. 15

Pages: 4–9

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Language: English

Article

School Fees–Another Payment Option

Publication: Montessori International, vol. 72

Pages: 49

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Language: English

ISSN: 1470-8647

Article

Why Become an AMI Recognized School?

Publication: AMI Elementary Alumni Association Newsletter, vol. 31, no. 2

Pages: 9–10

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Language: English

Article

A Montessori High School for Sydney

Publication: Montessori Matters

Pages: 2

Australasia, Australia, Australia and New Zealand, High schools, Montessori schools, Oceania

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Language: English

Article

Uit de School

Available from: Stadsarchief Amsterdam (Amsterdam City Archives)

Publication: Montessori Opvoeding, vol. 22, no. 1

Pages: 5

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Language: Dutch

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Impact of Parent Involvement on Preschool English Language Learners' Ability to Learn the English Language

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori preschool children who are English Language Learners (ELL) age three to five, consisting of one female and six males. It was conducted in two different preschool classrooms, focusing on literacy skills as well as oral communication skills. The direct aim of the study was to help children successfully learn English as their second language while keeping their native language. Researchers also investigated whether parental involvement increased the ability of ELLs to learn the English language. Data collection procedures utilized were: (1) parent interviews, (2) observation and anecdotal records, (3) pretest, and (4) post-test. A take-home literacy kit was used to measure the effectiveness of parental involvement. Researchers also provided a take-home literacy kit for parents to work on with their child at home. Parents were given a total of four literacy kits, one new kit each week. Result of this research indicated an improvement in parent and child interaction. The take-home literacy kit fostered communication between parent and child because words were translated in their home language. Over the course of four weeks, children showed great interest in literacy and progress in their communication skills.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2014

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