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Book Section

Religious Education: Work in the Firels as a Part of Religious Education

Book Title: The Discovery of the Child

Pages: 315-322

Maria Montessori - Writings

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Abstract/Notes: Formerly entitled The Montessori Method: Scientific Pedagogy as Applied to Child Education in the Children's Houses. This book was first published in 1909 under the title 'Il Metodo della Pedagogia Scientifica Applicato all'Educazione Infantile nelle Case dei Bambini' ('The Montessori Method: Scientific Pedagogy as Applied to Child Education in the Children's Houses) and was revised in 1913, 1926, and 1935. Maria Montessori revised and reissued this book in 1948 and renamed it 'La Scoperta del Bambino'. This edition is based on the 6th Italian edition of 'La Scoperta del Bambino' published by the Italian publisher Garzanti, Milan, Italy in 1962. M. J. Costelloe, S. J. translated this Italian version into the English language in 1967 for Fides Publishers, Inc. In 2016 Fred Kelpin edited this version and added many footnotes. He incorporated new illustrations based on AMI-blueprints of the materials currently in use.

Language: English

Published: Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Montessori-Pierson Publishing Company, 2017

ISBN: 978-90-79506-38-5

Series: The Montessori Series , 2

Article

Montessori Education and Modern Psychology [Excerpts from Education for Human Development]

Publication: AMI/USA News, vol. 6, no. 2

Pages: 3–6

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Language: English

Article

Review: Hundred Years of Montessori Education: A Chronicle of Montessori Education in Switzerland

Publication: Communications (Association Montessori Internationale, 195?-2008), vol. 2008, no. 1

Pages: 85-87

Book reviews, Europe, Harald Ludwig - Writings, Switzerland, Western Europe

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Language: English

ISSN: 0519-0959

Report

Alternatives in Education: An Exploration of Learner-Centered, Progressive, and Holistic Education

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: Based on a database of over 500 resources, this paper explores the educational alternatives that exist today between the cracks of mainstream education and culture. It presents information about the growing numbers of schools and education centers that call themselves learner-centered, progressive, and/or holistic. Sources of data for this summary report also include over 3 years of informal interviews with and observations of people at alternative schools. The paper begins by examining terminology issues, discussing qualities for distinguishing educational alternatives, and describing eight types of schools (democratic and free schools, folk education, Quaker schools, homeschooling/unschooling/deschooling, Krishnamurti schools, Montessori schools, open schools, and Waldorf schools). It also presents frameworks for education (maps for understanding the territories of alternatives), and it discusses the three orientations of a competency based education: transaction (progressive), self-directed (learner-centered), and transformation (holistic). After looking at political issues around school choice which could impact the growth of the various philosophical alternatives, the paper concludes that in a society where issues of pluralism and diversity are valued as part of creating a more sustainable world and just democracy, the diversity of philosophical perspectives in education needs to be acknowledged. (Contains 41 references.) (SM)

Language: English

Published: New Orleans, Louisiana, 2002

Doctoral Dissertation (Ed.D.)

An Investigation of Montessori Education Efficacy versus the Traditional General Education Classrooms for Improved Achievement

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: Students who have attended Montessori pre-kindergarten and kindergarten appear to experience greater academic success than those who attend the general classroom. The purpose of this research was to examine what Montessori classrooms did differently than the general education classrooms and whether Montessori prepares students for greater academic success in elementary school. There is a vast amount of literature available on the impact of Montessori education on student achievement, but few comparison studies. The methodology for this research was causal comparative. Quantitative data was collected to ascertain the practices of Montessori classrooms to produce more academic success than that of the general education classroom. The purpose was to determine if students in a Montessori classroom will have higher academic success or if those in a traditional general education classroom setting will have higher achievement on the MAP reading and math assessment.

Language: English

Published: Central, South Carolina, 2023

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Konsep Montessori Tentang Pendidikan Anak Usia Dini Dalam Perspektif Pendidikan Islam [The Montessori Concept of Early Childhood Education in the Perspective of Islamic Education]

Available from: Universitas Islam Negeri Sunan Kalijaga (Indonesia)

Publication: Jurnal Pendidikan Agama Islam [Journal of Islamic Religious Education], vol. 11, no. 1

Pages: 37-52

Asia, Australasia, Indonesia, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Religious education, Southeast Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Education is the business of adults to prepare children to be able to live independently and is able to perform the duties of his life as well as possible. The toddler years are a golden period for the growth and development of children. Development of each child must be observed, education and teaching needs to be ailored to the child’s development. Montessori is early childhood education leaders who opened the eyes of their sensitive period in children, Montessori asserted that education is self-education. Montessori then use the freedom and liveliness of the child with the best in the method, so that each child had the opportunity to evolve according to the nature and talent. In Islam, God entrusted the child is to be protected and educated with the best. Therefore, addressing the development and early childhood education, the need for an educational program that is designed in accordance with the child’s developmental level. This study aims to describe and analyze the Montessori concept of early childhood education in the perspective of Islamic education. Data collection through literature study is based on primary and secondary data. Data analysis using analytic descriptive with inductive thinking patterns. The results showed: 1) Montesssori shift from teacher-education center central (teachers as a source of learning) be child-central (protégé as a center of learning); 2) Sensitive Periods expressed early age is a sensitive period; 3) The freedom and independence according to the Montessori system is not real freedom, but freedom is limited; 4) Child’s Self-Construction stating that children construct their own development of his soul; 5) At the time of early childhood have a soul absorbent range of knowledge and experience in his life. Montessori concept in Islamic educational perspective, the emphasis is on the child’s intellectual is right. However, it should pay attention to other aspects such as emotional aspects and skills.

Language: Indonesian

DOI: 10.14421/jpai.2014.111-03

ISSN: 2502-2075

Article

Life Education [Drug education program]

Publication: Montessori Today (London), vol. 1, no. 5

Pages: 12-13

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Language: English

ISSN: 0952-8652

Article

What Is Meant by Cosmic Education? Why Does Cosmic Education Begin with the Six Year Old?

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 16, no. 4

Pages: 16-18

Cosmic education

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Language: English

Master's Thesis (M.A.)

“All Education but No Schooling”: Education Reform in Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s Herland

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: When critics consider utopian literature, they often claim that the utopian imagination is limited in its ability to provide practical instruction for societal reform. In Archaeologies of the Future, Fredric Jameson extends this critique by arguing that the utopian imagination only exists “to demonstrate and to dramatize our incapacity to imagine the future” (288-289). By returning to an early twentieth century utopian novel, Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s Herland (1915), we can put pressure on Jameson’s ideas about the ultimate function of the utopian imagination. By analyzing the education system in Herland, we are able to see how Gilman integrated the contemporary educational philosophy of John Dewey and methods of Maria Montessori to provide an intellectual and institutional foundation for her utopian education system. Therefore, Gilman provides a set of ‘instructions’ to suggest how we might reform current methods of education to fit within her utopian vision. Gilman’s Herland allows us to see how a highly imaginative utopian text can promote social change to build a ‘better’ future.

Language: English

Published: Carbondale, Illinois, 2016

Book

India, Democracy and Education: A Study of the Work of the Birla Education Trust

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Language: English

Published: Bombay, India: Orient Longmans, 1955

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