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384 results

Master's Thesis

The Effects of Connecting Rituals on Verbal Conflicts in the Montessori Preschool Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this action research project was to see if a program through Conscious Discipline called Connecting Rituals would decrease the number of verbal conflicts in a Montessori preschool classroom. Conscious Discipline is a non-punitive, non-adversarial behavior program that is backed by current brain science. One aspect of the Conscious Discipline model is Connecting Rituals. Connecting Rituals are short games, nursery rhymes, and finger plays that adults and children do together in large or small groups. The Connecting Rituals would increase self-regulation and social skills in a Montessori preschool classroom. The study was conducted in a Montessori preschool classroom at a small Montessori school in the Midwestern United States with 23 preschool children, 2.5-6 years old children. Data was collected over a 4 week period using tally marks to record the number of conflicts, a large group discussion, a teacher daily journal and a post-connecting ritual form. Every day the researcher did a Connecting Ritual at the large group gathering with all the children before lunch and at least one Connecting Ritual with each child during the morning work time over a two week period. The study found that the Connecting Rituals did decrease the number of verbal conflicts, but the results were not significant. Further study is needed to understand the long term effects of using Connecting Rituals in the classroom.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2020

Article

Helping Children Navigate Global Tragedy

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 30, no. 1

Pages: 36-39

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Abstract/Notes: Because we experience the trauma of global tragedy in a much more immediate and unfiltered way than we used to, it is more difficult for us to shield ourselves and our children from the barrage of sensationalized and politicized images flooding our environment. To achieve this, I looked for articles that: * were Montessori-compatible in that they had at their center the experience of the child, aligned with our understanding of the planes of development, and spoke to the human tendencies toward orientation, gregariousness, order, communication, exploration, and self-perfection; * were parent-friendly in that they were easy to read and digest, offered practical advice, and did not put added pressure on parents to be more perfect or blame parents for not being able to control children's media exposure; * were accurate from a child development and psychology perspective, and offered a realistic view of how media are produced and disseminated; * came from sources that are reasonably reputable and proactive in their management of other social issues; * put the onus on the adult, not the child, to create an environment in which resilience can be developed (in essence, furthering the spiritual preparation of the teacher). "According to the UN, young people, including children, are the largest group of people affected by disasters across the world. " "Talking to Children about Violence: Tips for Parents and Teachers," by the National Association of School Psychologists (bit.ly/2rFWIsK) This article presents 7 tips to support children in dealing with the aftermath of violent events, along with a list of talking points to use that will reassure children while maintaining a realistic outlook.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Montessori Education at a Distance, Part 1: A Survey of Montessori Educators’ Response to a Global Pandemic

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 7, no. 1

Pages: 1-29

Americas, COVID-19 Pandemic, Montessori method of education, North America, Remote learning, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: The transition to distance learning in the spring of 2020 caused by COVID-19 was particularly challenging for Montessori educators and students because key elements of the Method were not directly transferable to this new and hastily designed format. Hands-on learning with Montessori materials and learning in a community, as well as careful teacher observation, could not be easily replicated when children were learning from home. To understand how educators applied Montessori principles to serve children and families in these highly unusual circumstances, we surveyed Early Childhood and Elementary Montessori teachers about how they translated core elements of Montessori education to a distance-learning environment. The overall results suggest that Montessori distance-learning arrangements balanced live videoconference experiences for children with offline hands-on activities, while also relying on parents’ and caregivers’ involvement. Teachers reported that they largely designed learning experiences themselves, without significant support or guidance from school leaders. Still, teachers reported that they were able to uphold Montessori principles to only a moderate degree under the circumstances. While teachers understandably hunger for support, professional connections, and a return to the classroom experiences that drew them to the field of Montessori education, this study highlights factors that may affect the transition back to school for teachers, parents and caregivers, and students when face-to-face instruction resumes for all children.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v7i1.15122

ISSN: 2378-3923

Article

Ball for Free Schools: Montessori Association Plans Benefit for Its Work

Available from: Library of Congress

Publication: New York Tribune (New York City, NY)

Pages: 5

Americas, Montessori Educational Association (USA), Montessori method of education, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: "A Mi-Carême ball will be given at the Plaza on March 11 for the benefit of the free Montessori Tenement Schools of New York. Mrs. E. Thompson Seton, of 512 Fifth av., is chairman of the finance committee of the New York Chapter of the Montessori Educational Association that is maintaining these institutions. One of the most interesting of these schools is situated in what was meant to be three tenements, south of the John Jay dwellings, at 77th st., near the East River. It consists of an office, a schoolroom, a playroom and kitchen. The schoolroom is equipped with low desks for the small children of the neighborhood and luncheon is served by the scholars themselves at a round table in the playroom. A canary and a frog are kept as pets."

Language: English

Article

Private Speech in Two Preschools: Significance of Open-Ended Activities and Make-Believe Play for Verbal Self-Regulation

Available from: ScienceDirect

Publication: Early Childhood Research Quarterly, vol. 13, no. 4

Pages: 637–658

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Abstract/Notes: Contextual influences on private speech were examined in two preschools differing in the learning environments they provide for children. Observations of 3- to 5-year-olds were made during free-choice periods in a Montessori and a traditional (play-oriented) program. Consistent with Vygotsky's theory that make-believe play serves as a vital context for the development of self-regulation, the incidence of private speech was much higher during open-ended activities, especially fantasy play, that require children to determine the goal of the task, than during closed-ended tasks with predetermined goals. In line with previous research, the more direct involvement, or external regulation, teachers displayed, the lower the rate of children's private speech. In addition, transitions (as opposed to involvement in activities) were linked to reduced private speech, whereas engagement with peers, in the form of associative play, predicted greater self-directed language. Diminished make-believe play, greater teacher direct involvement, and heightened time spent in transitions largely accounted for the lower incidence of private speech in the Montessori compared with the traditional preschool. Contextual factors also contributed to a drop in private speech at age 5. Implications for fostering children's verbal self-regulation during early childhood are considered.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1016/S0885-2006(99)80065-9

Book

The Joyful Child: Montessori, Global Wisdom for Birth to Three

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Language: English

Published: Arcata, California: Michael Olaf, 2013

Article

A Global View of Montessori

Publication: Communications of the Association Montessori Internationale (1961-2008), vol. 1989, no. 4

Pages: 18-21

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Language: English

ISSN: 1877-539X

Article

Shared Reading: Critical to a Balanced Reading Program

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 29, no. 3

Pages: 14–19

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Language: English

Article

Authentic Abroad Experiences with the Montessori Peace Now Student Organization: An Educational Laboratory for Montessori Global Engagement in Costa Rica

Publication: Whole School Montessori Handbook

Pages: 423–425

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Language: English

Article

Review: Bringing Out the Brilliance in Your Infant: A Guide to Conscious Parenting by Tamara Sheesley Balis

Publication: Tomorrow's Child, vol. 16, no. 2

Pages: 41

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Abstract/Notes: review of DVD

Language: English

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