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640 results

Article

Integrating Montessori Principles in Mental Health Education

Available from: CORE

Publication: Journal of Research in Business, Economics and Management, vol. 11, no. 5

Pages: 2247-2252

Child psychopathology, Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, Mental health, Mentally ill children, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: This research paper will seek to address the ensuing principal research question: “What has been the role of early childhood education for the mentally ill child?” The Montessori principles which can be found in the proposed research lies in the fact that relative research undertaken on the role of mentally ill children's education still continue to be in its infancy stage. There are a number of academic publications which have focused on the identification of key areas in need of further study between students‟ social, emotional wellbeing, mental health and their school success as well as academic achievement. This research aims to investigate to what extent Maria Montessori„s argument could be significant for today‟s educational policies for the mentally ill. Montessori studied her mentally disabled patients, listening and carefully noting their response to her attempts to implement Séguin's educational methods, as well as their progress in becoming increasingly independent and verbal. The study will target this void by enunciating, refining and encompassing some of the recent hypothetical viewpoints of Montessori education and mental care.

Language: English

DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.3952657

ISSN: 2395-2210

Report

The Effects of Montessori Educational Techniques on Culturally Disadvantaged Head Start Children

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: To determine whether significant differences exist in skill performance as a result of head start experience and to determine whether these differences exist between two ethnic groups, 17 Anglo-American [White] and 62 Mexican American [Latino] culturally disadvantaged children were pre-tested and post-tested during the summer of 1965 in connection with six-week head start programs in Costa Mesa and Fullerton, California. Five teachers using modified Montessori materials stressed three developmental areas, (1) perceptual-motor, (2) social-emotional, and (3) intellectual-academic. Seven instruments were used to test the program's effectiveness--Gesell Maturation Index, Mateer Inversion Test, tests of dominance, teacher rating scale, Goodenough-Harris D-A-P, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, and wide range achievement test. Results showed that certain handicaps do exist among culturally disadvantaged children prior to school experience and that positive gains occurred when enrichment experiences were provided. Greatest gains were in the areas of intellectual-academic and social-emotional skills. Ethnic differences appeared in the linguistic skills limitations of the Mexican American children. Need for medical and dental attention was apparent in both groups. Future provision should be made for continued preschool education and wider dissemination of health services. (LG)

Language: English

Published: Fullerton, California, Sep 1965

Report

Ancona Montessori Research Project for Culturally Disadvantaged Children. Final Report

Available from: ERIC

Academic achievement, Americas, Cognitive development, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Elementary school students, Longitudinal studies, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, Parent participation, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This is the final report of the Ancona Montessori Research Project for Culturally Disadvantaged Children begun in 1965 to investigate the effects of a modified Montessori program for disadvantaged children in the preschool and early elementary years. This report deals with the academic year 1969-1970, in which 29 disadvantaged children and a comparable group of 29 middle class children are the central focus of study. In addition, there is a followup on the school careers of disadvantaged children who attended Ancona at one time. A number of hypotheses about the potential effects of the project on the children's cognitive, social development are studied. Part I of the report deals with findings relative to the nursery school children, and includes a discussion of data from three measures of intellectual development (Stanford Binet, WPPSI and Merrill-Palmer) and from tester and teacher ratings of school-related behaviors and attitudes and social interaction. Part II details findings on the elementary school children and followup data on children who attended Ancona in previous years but are now elementary school students in other schools. In addition, data regarding children whose families have had long term involvement in the school is discussed. The appendix includes Ancona school Head Start program ratings of behavior during individual intelligence testing. (MS)

Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C., Aug 31, 1970

Article

Montessori Partners Serving All Children: An Outreach Initiative of the Montessori Center of Minnesota

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 39, no. 2

Pages: 93-100

Academic achievement, Child development, Cognitive development, Early childhood education, Elementary education, Montessori method of education, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori Partners Serving All Children is endorsed in terms of economic development as a statistically proven return for the money, leadership, parent education, institutional partners, and a sense of community in preparing teachers to serve families with a hub of resources through Montessori Center of Minnesota. Assessment is also integral to the team in terms of children's academic skills, cognitive, social, emotional, and physical growth and is aligned with school structures such as administration, professional development, and technical assistance. [This talk was presented at the NAMTA conference titled "Montessori from Birth to Six: In Search of Community Values," (Minneapolis, MN, Nov 7-10, 2013).]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Why Does Multiage Make Sense? Compelling Arguments for Educational Change

Publication: Primary Voices K-6, vol. 6, no. 2

Pages: 2-9

Academic achievement, Americas, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Nongraded schools, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Discusses the overwhelmingly positive evidence from experience and research which suggests that a multiage environment can be superior to one of age-segregated class levels. Illuminates the logic of educating students in mixed-age groups (called multiage) by discussing the academic and social advantages, the affective benefits, and the positive impact on both promotion and long-term educational goals. (SR)

Language: English

ISSN: 1068-073X

Article

Continuous Progress Schools See the "Whole Child"

Publication: Education (Chula Vista, Calif.), vol. 129, no. 2

Pages: 324-326

Academic achievement, Americas, Elementary schools, Holistic education, North America, United States of America, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: It has been called many names: Continuous Progress Format, Advancement Based on Competency (ABC), Continuous Progress Schools, and Continuous Progress Education. The idea of "Continuous Progress" refers to academic and developmental growth of students in a multi-age program. Students learn new materials as they are ready, regardless of their age, and teachers help them advance as far as they are able. The students progress at their own pace and begin each new year where they left off the year before. Since a Continuous Progress classroom has students working at various levels, each student must take responsibility for his or her own learning (North Central Regional Educational Laboratory, n.d.).

Language: English

ISSN: 0013-1172

Doctoral Dissertation

Effectiveness of Preschool in Preparing Students for Kindergarten: A Comparison of Early Childhood Curriculum Models

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: Early childhood education has been shown to positively impact future academic performance, as well as social and emotional development. With ever-increasing demands being placed on children's academic performances, school readiness has become a key component of academic success. The purpose of this quantitative causal-comparative study was to examine the effectiveness of different early childhood curriculum models in preparing children for kindergarten, and to investigate whether one early childhood curriculum model better prepares students than another. The theoretical framework for the study is based on the developmental constructivist theories of Piaget, Vygotsky, Erikson, and Dewey. Kindergarten teachers assessed school readiness by administering the Kindergarten Observation Form. Each student had matriculated from either Montessori, High/Scope, or Reggio Emilia programs or early childhood programs without an identified curriculum model. Kindergarten teachers rated students on 24 items related to areas of cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional, and physical development. ANOVA and post-hoc tests revealed that students matriculating from programs without an identified curriculum model scored significantly better than their counterparts, F (3,122) = 5.33, p = .002. Implications for social change include improved kindergarten readiness on the part of students, increased awareness by educators as to best practices in early childhood education, and, a move towards understanding the types of environments in which children learn best.

Language: English

Published: Minneapolis, Minnesota, 2012

Article

Montessori Middle School and the Transition to High School: Student Narratives

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 6, no. 2

Americas, High school students, Middle school students, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This narrative study investigated through storytelling the experiences of five students who attended a Montessori middle school and then transitioned to a public high school. The testimonies of the participants highlighted that, to help students make a successful transition to high school, it is useful to consider three elements: (a) developing academic and social-emotional skills, (b) fostering positive attitudes toward learning, and (c) creating opportunities to practice self-reliance, self-advocacy, and grit. The experience of these particular students accentuates the ability of a Montessori middle school to emphasize both academic rigor and the social-emotional skills that build the fortitude necessary for students to successfully transition to high school. This study suggests that Montessori middle school practices may foster the intellectual and emotional growth of students so that they can successfully transition to high school and are potentially buffered from many of the detrimental academic and emotional impacts of ninth grade.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v6i2.13854

ISSN: 2378-3923

Doctoral Dissertation

A Phenomenology of Educational Care: Early Adolescent Descriptions

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: School design and operation are, at times, counter-productive to cultivating academic and personal success in all students. Teachers often lack adequate preparation time, and are pressed by class size and regulatory mandates. Thus, there is seemingly little time to focus on cultivating affective well-being or a supportive educational climate. This lack of support is linked to high drop-out rates, large numbers of academically unsuccessful students, and the disenfranchisement of many minority and English Language learners in our school system. The phenomenon of care, particularly as it relates to education, has been studied only briefly. Few comprehensive, qualitative descriptions regarding how students conceptualize care exist despite significant evidence that when students perceive teachers and schools as caring, they have higher and more sustainable levels of academic motivation. This research project endeavored to give children a voice regarding educational care through a qualitative study on the phenomenon of care from an adolescent perspective. The study employed multiple data collection methods including: interviews, art, and student writing with students ages 11-14 from two school environments. Data collected were analyzed using the vanKamm phenomenological method of analysis. Results indicated that the phenomenon of educational care was a complex set of actions and behaviors from the student vantage point. Five themes emerged including: (1) Relationships are a critical aspect of educational care, (2) Rules in educational settings should be simple and consistent within classrooms and institutions, (3) Students perceive some control of their learning environments as caring, (4) Educational environments and teacher behavior are both critical to care, (5) Basic safety and concern for physical space are necessary for educational care. Each theme is independently necessary but not sufficient when observed alone in educational contexts. Together these themes support Nel Noddings' ideal version of ethical caring, in that they involve motivated behaviors, reciprocal action, receptivity on the part of the students, and a sense of obligation to care in a manner above and beyond noticing the basic well being of the student. The themes indicated by the data demonstrated a multifaceted view of educational care previously undiscovered and provide useful fodder for educators to consider.

Language: English

Published: St. Louis, Missouri, 2010

Doctoral Dissertation

An Evaluation of Magnet School Programs-Parent Choice, Teacher Choice, and Pupil Choice: Implications of One Model for Curriculum Reform

Available from: University of Illinois - IDEALS

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Abstract/Notes: It is quite clear that there is considerable disagreement as to the ways children learn and the ways teachers should teach. There is very little conclusive data comparing the major efforts in this field particularly with respect to any one factor being the sole contributor to the superiority of any one effort. The recent literature on learning and teaching almost invariably returns to some form of curriculum reform. However, there is widespread agreement that teachers teach more effectively and children learn more efficiently if they are in environments conducive to their preferred styles. Magnet Schools are vehicles that require different arrangements for teaching and learning. This study explores the attitudes of teachers, parents, and students in such an environment. Additionally, it examines the academic performance of students when parents or the students themselves select their learning environment and teaching method. The data will permit comparisons among the various groups of Magnet and non-Magnet parents, teachers, and students. The primary method for data collection is academic testing and structural surveys of the populations relative to Magnet and non-Magnet participants. The data will also indicate how individuals view programs and curriculum when they are involved in them. Because the population surveyed and tested involved a cross-section of academic abilities, the data will be especially useful to local school district officials interested in providing for individual differences in teaching and learning. The control model of Magnet School programs provides an ongoing testing ground for fine-tuning educational theories which may be essential for productive learning in the broader system as well.

Language: English

Published: Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, 1984

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