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595 results

Doctoral Dissertation (Ed.D.)

A Ray of Light: A Mixed-Methods Approach to Understanding Why Parents Choose Montessori Education

Available from: University of Nebraska Libraries

Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Parents - Perceptions

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Abstract/Notes: This study explored why parents choose Montessori schools for their children. Parents from two public (n = 40) and two private (n = 10) Montessori schools responded to a written survey designed to discern what characteristics parents valued in making their decision. Descriptive statistics, t-tests, and chi-square tests were used to understand the trends present in parents‟ responses. Comparisons were made between public and private Montessori parents to explore the overarching themes and to determine differences that existed between the two types of parents. The researcher conducted thirteen interviews designed to elicit additional information about why the parents chose Montessori programs and to confirm the results of the quantitative data. Open-ended survey items and interview transcripts were coded using content analysis. Public and private Montessori school parents valued similar factors and characteristics with a few significant differences. Public Montessori parents valued diversity and free tuition while private Montessori parents placed higher value on academic programming. Information obtained from the participants indicated several areas of opportunity for schools to develop creative marketing strategies and to employ innovative strategies for improvement.

Language: English

Published: Lincoln, Nebraska, 2010

Master's Thesis (M.S. Ed.)

Education that Fosters Environmental Literacy

Available from: MINDS@UW River Falls

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Abstract/Notes: This study was conducted to examine the effects of exploratory play in nature combined with locally based, environmental education (EE), on the environmental literacy (EL) of students in a lower elementary Montessori classroom. The study included one lower elementary Montessori classroom consisting of 24 students of which there were 12 girls and 12 boys, ranging from six to nine years of age. Activities consisted of environmental games, environmental art, lessons and activities that were designed to develop knowledge of the flora and fauna in and around the school. Lessons were followed with opportunities to write/draw reflections on lesson content or complete additional research. Data included questionnaires completed by students before and after the study, parent surveys, student interviews, teacher observations, and samples of student work. Though there were limitations of cold weather and time period, data demonstrated an increase in environmental literacy during the course of the study.

Language: English

Published: River Falls, Wisconsin, 2018

Article

Reflections on the Internationality of Montessori Education

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 20, no. 3

Pages: 40-44

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Abstract/Notes: One of the major components of Dr. Montessori's plan for peace education is a curriculum that de-emphasizes nationalism. The "big picture" of the cultural curriculum encourages the perspective that people are citizens of Earth first, and only secondarily American, Japanese, Polish, or other nationalities. Through the fundamental needs material, children learn that all people on all continents throughout history had and have the same basic needs. In preindustrial times, geographic context, together with local natural resources, determined how different groups of people met their needs. And because this is still true, the Montessori geography curriculum is not limited to land and water forms and political borders, but necessarily extends to the people who inhabit other places. It teaches that other people are much like everyone else in terms of basic needs, but that they may meet those needs in very different ways; and children learn to respect those differences. Such a perspective is developed in Montessori settings even where little ethnic, religious, or social diversity exists, as long as a quality program is in place. Additionally, planetwide problems that Montessori may not have specifically anticipated, such as global warming, necessitate new attitudes and curricula that form and emphasize an "ecopsychological" awareness. This article examines the relevance of Montessori education to international schools: When properly integrated, Montessori complements and enhances many aspects of an international school, but when misapplied or partially applied, the obstacles that result can be quite difficult to overcome.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Reforming Public Education: The IMS Montessori Approach

Available from: Internet Archive

Publication: Montessori Observer, vol. 29, no. 4

Pages: 1, 4

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Language: English

ISSN: 0889-5643

Article

What Are the Fundamentals of Montessori Education?

Publication: Communications (Association Montessori Internationale, 195?-2008), vol. 1987, no. 4

Pages: 14–25

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Language: English

ISSN: 0519-0959

Book

Nursery Report on: Rockliffe Montessori Nursery: The Inspection of Educational Provision for Four Year Old Children

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Language: English

Published: Cardiff, Wales: Welsh Office, 1998

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Comparison of Academic Achievement Between Montessori and Traditional Education Programs

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Journal of Research in Childhood Education, vol. 20, no. 1

Pages: 5-13

Americas, Comparative education, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was to compare the academic achievement of 543 urban 4th- (n=291) and 8th- (n=252) grade students who attended Montessori or traditional education programs. The majority of the sample consisted of minority students (approximately 53 percent), and was considered low income (approximately 67 percent). Students who attended a public Montessori school were compared with students who attended structured magnet, open magnet, and traditional non-magnet public schools on standardized measures of math and language arts. Results of the study failed to support the hypothesis that enrollment in a Montessori school was associated with higher academic achievement. Implications and suggestions for future research are provided.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/02568540509594546

ISSN: 0256-8543, 2150-2641

Blog Post

New Research Highlights The Long-Term Benefits Of A Montessori Education

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori children turn into happy adults, suggests a new study.

Language: English

Published: Dec 28, 2021

Article

FTC Threatens Private Education

Publication: Montessori Observer, vol. 2, no. 7

Pages: 1, 4

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Language: English

ISSN: 0889-5643

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Character Education Using Literature and Discussions

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: Laminack and Wadsworth (2012) “believe the single most important thing we can teach our children is kindness” (p. 1). I hoped to teach kindness characteristics to students in my first, second and third-grade classroom, as well as, lessen students’ frequency of unkind behaviors. I utilized Laminack and Wadsworths’ (2012) curriculum Bullying Hurts: Teaching Kindness through Read Alouds and Guided Conversations as my action research focus. Throughout my study, I used a tally chart and observation journal to track the frequency and types of behaviors students demonstrated. Also, students completed a behavioral self-assessment before and after implementation to assess their opinions of their behaviors. Finally, students completed a kindness assessment to demonstrate their views on the effectiveness of the curriculum. Data results show kindness lessons decreased frequency of unkind behaviors and improved students’ personal opinions of themselves. Given the results of my study, kindness curriculum may improve student behaviors in other classrooms.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2015

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