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669 results

Article

Stanley Montessori school i Hong Kong: en internationell mötesplats i det lilla formatet

Publication: Montessori-tidningen (Svenska montessoriförbundet), no. 3

Pages: 12-13

Asia, China, East Asia, Hong Kong, Stanley Montessori School (Hong Kong)

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Language: Swedish

ISSN: 1103-8101

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Developing Data-Driven Administrative Policy for International Montessori Center, Thailand

Available from: Asian Institute of Research

Publication: Education Quarterly Reviews, vol. 4, no. 2

Pages: 8-25

Asia, Montessori method of education, Southeast Asia, Thailand

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Abstract/Notes: This institutional survey research was used to improve administrative policies at International Montessori Center (IMC), a private international kindergarten in Bangkok, Thailand. The main goal of the study was to gather input from school stakeholders regarding daily conditions and functions, with the ultimate goal of improved administrative policy implementation. A literature review indicated no direct prior research. A survey gathered input from four stakeholder groups, including 15 teachers, 104 parents, 17 staff, and 3 administrators, regarding Physical Safety, Child Sense of Being Valued (classroom atmosphere), Classroom Conditions, Information Availability, Parent-Teacher Meeting Quality, Administrative Support, Parental Support (overall), Educational Tools and Technology, Quality of Peer Professional Relationships, and Availability of Needed Supplies. Stakeholders rated the daily operations areas using five-point Likert-style questions and responded to two open-ended questions. In sum, findings highlighted a number of useful perspectives for the little-studied early-childhood administrative community: (a) seemingly mundane school functions are important to those who experience them on a regular basis; (b) all stakeholder input is valuable when gathering school daily operations feedback; (c) similarities "and" differences in stakeholder input help administrators develop a more holistic perspective of school functioning; and (d) stakeholder input is a valuable tool for administrators to use when critically considering responsive policy formulation. Conclusions reached were limited to correlations and patterns found in one institution. However, it is clear that this original research is a valuable step in improving administrative policy implementation at the private international kindergarten level.

Language: English

DOI: 10.31014/aior.1993.04.02.192

ISSN: 2621-5799, 2657-215X

Blog Post

Montessori in Kenya

Africa, East Africa, Kenya, Montessori method of education, Sub-Saharan Africa

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Abstract/Notes: Cover image courtesy of Montessori Around the World. Written by Amelia Murray, The University of Oklahoma Abstract  Maria Montessori was an Italian doctor who founded an education system based…

Language: English

Published: Jul 27, 2021

Article

The Learning Tree Montessori Child Care: An Approach to Diversity [Seattle, Washington]

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 18, no. 4

Pages: 34-35

Children with disabilities, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Early childhood education - Parent participation, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Special education, The Learning Tree Montessori Child Care (Seattle), ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: In this article the author describes how she and her partners started The Learning Tree Montessori Child Care, a Montessori program with a different approach in Seattle in 1979. The author also relates that the other area Montessori schools then offered half-day programs, and as a result the children who attended were, for the most part, privileged, suburban, and white (their mothers could easily shuttle them back and forth to a half-day Montessori session). Instead of following the common practice of a Montessori 3-hour preschool experience followed by afternoon child care on- or offsite, their school has always offered a full-time seamless Montessori child-care program for children 2 1/2 through 5 years old with a 3-year age mix in every classroom. Parents may choose an all day program from 7:30 to 5:30 or a "school day" program from 9:00 to 3:00. The school's mission was to serve children of diverse ethnic and economic backgrounds as well as children from gay and lesbian families, with a goal that at least 20-25% of the families are eligible for some kind of tuition subsidy. Another significant feature of The Learning Tree is the extensive parent involvement in school programs.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

An Association Between Montessori Education in Childhood and Adult Wellbeing

Available from: Frontiers in Psychology

Publication: Frontiers in Psychology, vol. 12

Pages: 721943

Developmental psychology, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Early childhood education, Montessori method of education, Wellbeing, Wellbeing

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Abstract/Notes: Wellbeing, or how people think and feel about their lives, predicts important life outcomes from happiness to health to longevity. Montessori pedagogy has features that enhance wellbeing contemporaneously and predictively, including self-determination, meaningful activities, and social stability. Here, 1905 adults, ages 18-81 (M = 36), filled out a large set of wellbeing scales followed by demographic information including type of school attended each year from 2 to 17. About half the sample had only attended conventional schools and the rest had attended Montessori for between 2 and 16 years (M = 8 years). To reduce the variable set, we first developed a measurement model of wellbeing using the survey data with exploratory then confirmatory factor analyses, arriving at four factors: general wellbeing, engagement, social trust, and self-confidence. A structural equation model that accounted for age, gender, race, childhood SES, and years in private school revealed that attending Montessori for at least two childhood years was associated with significantly higher adult wellbeing on all four factors. A second analysis found that the difference in wellbeing between Montessori and conventional schools existed even among the subsample that had exclusively attended private schools. A third analysis found that the more years one attended Montessori, the higher one's wellbeing as an adult. Unmeasured selection effects could explain the results, in which case research should determine what third variable associated with Montessori schooling causes adult wellbeing. Several other limitations to the study are also discussed. Although some of these limitations need to be addressed, coupled with other research, including studies in which children were randomly assigned to Montessori schools, this study suggests that attending Montessori as a child might plausibly cause higher adult wellbeing.

Language: English

DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2021.721943

ISSN: 1664-1078

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Early Childhood Curriculum Reform in China

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Chinese Educaton and Society, vol. 44, no. 6

Pages: 5-23

Asia, China, East Asia, Educational change

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Abstract/Notes: Two waves of reform have been conducted in China since the 1980s to transform its early childhood curriculum into a Western-style, progressive model. Western curricula and programs such as the Montessori method, the project approach, the Reggio Emilia method, and the high/scope method have been imported and adopted all over the country. But the top-down reforms and these “imported” ideas have been challenged by scholars and practitioners. Aiming to understand how practices in kindergartens measure up with the reform objectives, the present study investigated the teachers’ beliefs and practices in five Shenzhen kindergartens’ literacy instruction. Altogether, ten early childhood classrooms were observed for one school week, and the ten classroom teachers were interviewed about the observed Chinese teaching practices. The teachers and teaching assistants of the ten classes (N = 20) were also surveyed about their teaching beliefs and practices. The results indicated a remarkable belief-practice gap as well as a policy-practice gap. Most of the curriculum reform ideas were expressed by the teachers in their self-reported beliefs but had not been implemented in their teaching practice. The traditional Chinese model with the teacher directing the whole-class session was still dominating. Slight differences were also found among the ten classes, which reflect the cascading effects of curriculum reform. These findings suggest that curriculum reforms should take into consideration the culture, language, teachers, parents, resources available, and the prevailing education system.

Language: English

DOI: 10.2753/CED1061-1932440601

ISSN: 1061-1932, 1944-7119

Book

Doma rebenka Montessori v Rime, ikh teoriya i praktika / Дома ребенка Монтессори в Риме: их теория и практика [Montessori Orphanages in Rome: Their Theory and Practice]

Eastern Europe, Europe, Italy, Russia, Southern Europe

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Abstract/Notes: Author: E. I. Tikheeva

Language: Russian

Published: Петроград [Petrograd / St. Petersburg]: B. i., 1915

Conference Paper

Culturally Relevant Education and the Montessori Approach: Perspectives from Hawaiian Educators

Available from: ERIC

Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (San Francisco, CA, Apr 8, 2006)

Americas, Culturally relevant pedagogy, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (San Francisco, CA, Apr 8, 2006). The purpose of this study was to investigate why some Hawaiian language and culture-based (HLCB) educators perceived the Montessori approach to be congruent with their goals and values and to determine the salient features of the Montessori approach used by HLCB teachers who received Montessori training. The sociocultural perspective on learning provided the theoretical foundations and grounded theory methodology guided the research process. Interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with 40 HLCB participants, including 15 key informants who had at least 180 hours of Montessori training. Data also included classroom and school visits and analyses of school documents. Data analysis revealed six themes and two linkages that related the themes and their elements. Four themes were related to why HLCB educators have perceived the Montessori approach to be congruent with their values and goals. These were (a) similar views regarding their work as a lifestyle, (b) common pedagogical practices, (c) shared values and beliefs as educators, and (d) an overlapping world-view. One theme described the distinctions between the approaches. The final theme included challenges to implementing and maintaining HLCB programs. The findings suggest that researchers and teacher educators interested in culturally congruent education should take into account the underlying world-view of both the research paradigm and the participants involved, and that school reform should be comprehensive, culturally congruent, and generated from within communities and other stakeholders. They also indicate that culturally congruent, place-based education may enhance academic self-efficacy and could serve as a bridge between seemingly disparate educational approaches.

Language: English

Conference Paper

Effects of Multigrade Classes on Student Progress in Literacy and Numeracy: Quantitative Evidence and Perceptions of Teachers and School Leaders

Available from: ERIC

Annual Meeting of the Australian Association for Research in Education (Adelaide, Australia, November 29-December 3, 1998).

Perceptions

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Abstract/Notes: On the basis of a comprehensive best-evidence synthesis of the literature on the effects of multigrade and multi-age classes, Veenman (1995) concluded that there were no significant differences between multigrade and single-grade classes in cognitive or achievement effects. Subsequently, Mason and Burns (1996) challenged Veenman's conclusion, claiming that multigrade classes have at least a small negative effect on achievement, as well as having potential negative effects on teacher motivation. Multigrade classes are used extensively within Victorian primary schools, sometimes by choice but at other times as a result of the combined pressures from staff-student ratios and enrollment numbers at particular grade levels. The issue of their contribution to effective learning is thus a critical, practical one, as well as an interesting research question. Analysis of data from the Victorian Quality Schools Project, a large, comprehensive, three-year, longitudinal study of school and

Language: English

Conference Paper

Prospects in Japanese Childhood Education and Teacher Training for the Coming Century

AMI International Study Conference

AMI Montessori Study Conference (20th, Washington, DC, USA, 30 July - 4 August 1988), Asia, East Asia, Japan

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Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C.: AMI-USA, 1988

Pages: 40-45

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