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616 results

Article

Every Mother Should Read Dr. W. N. Hailman's Critical Analysis 'Is Montessori the Educational Columbus?' [advertisement]

Available from: NewsBank - San Diego Union Historical

Publication: San Diego Union (San Diego, California)

Pages: II-1

Americas, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, United States of America

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Language: English

Book

Ideas in nursery education, session 4, the Montessori method: a critical appraisal

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Language: English

Published: Cleveland, Ohio: Cleveland College, Division of General Studies, n.d.

Book

A critical analysis of the two forms of auto-education: the Montessori method and programmed instruction

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Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C.: Catholic University of America, 1967

Book

From Locke to Montessori: A Critical Account of the Montessori Point of View

Available from: HathiTrust

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Language: English

Published: London, England: George G. Harrap and Company, 1914

Doctoral Dissertation (Ph.D.)

Critical Montessori Education: Centering BIPOC Montessori Educators and their Anti-Racist Teaching Practices

Available from: University of Maryland Libraries

Anti-bias, Anti-bias anti-racist curriculum, Anti-bias anti-racist practices, Anti-racism, Montessori method of education - Teachers, People of color, Teachers

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Abstract/Notes: While many BIPOC Montessori educators engage in anti-racist and culturally responsive teaching, Montessori education remains predominantly race-evasive. As a philosophy, it is rooted in colorblind perspectives in its focus on "all children" and lack of explicit centering of BIPOC students’ experiences. Teaching must account for race and racial lived realities in order to better support BIPOC students’ ways of knowing in culturally relevant and sustaining ways. This study seeks to center the voices of BIPOC Montessori educators and disrupt the pattern of Montessori research conducted without a critical racial lens. Framed by Critical Race Theory, this study focuses on the strengths, assets, and anti-racist teaching practices that one BIPOC educator brings to her classroom. I use critical ethnographic methods to better understand how a BIPOC Montessori teacher at a public charter Montessori school interprets and enacts the Montessori method to support BIPOC students. I consider how her racial identity informs her practices, and the structural barriers she faces at her school when enacting anti-racist and strength-based approaches. The guiding research questions of this study are: How does a Black Montessori teacher interpret the Montessori philosophy to more relevantly support her BIPOC students? How does she practice the Montessori method through culturally relevant and sustaining practices? What are the structural barriers that continue to challenge her as a Black educator doing her work? My analysis suggests that the teacher maintains her classroom space as a tangible and intangible cultural space that reflects and maintains her students' identities; that her own identity as a Black woman deeply contribute to the school's work around anti-racism and culturally responsive pedagogy; and that there are external barriers that both the teacher and the school face, that prevent them both from fully achieving culturally responsive teaching practices. At the core of the study, I seek to understand the possibilities and challenges of Montessori education from the perspective of BIPOC Montessori educators, and how we could learn from them to better support BIPOC students. I hope to begin a path toward more counter-stories in the Montessori community to specifically support BIPOC Montessori educators and understand the structural barriers they face to anti-racist teaching in Montessori programs in the United States.

Language: English

Published: College Park, Maryland, 2023

Article

The Rules for Montessori Meetings and Decision Making: Critical Steps in the Blueprint Process

Publication: Montessori Leadership, vol. 8, no. 3

Pages: 34–35, 44

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Language: English

Article

Dear Alice and Betty: Our Interview with Two Respected, Veteran Teachers Brings Critical Response

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 10, no. 1

Pages: 24

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Doctoral Dissertation (Ph.D.)

Emotional Wellness in NM Early Childhood Educators: A Critical Constructivist Examination of Neoliberalism in Education Policy and the Influence of Neoliberal Policy on Educator Wellness

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: This dissertation examines neoliberalist policy in public school education in order to understand the influence of this neoliberalist policy on educator wellness in New Mexico early educators. Establishing the neoliberal influence in public education, the presidencies of Eisenhower, Johnson, Carter, G.H.W. Bush, G.W. Bush, and Obama, as related to education policy and influences, presents the idea of education for profit through high stakes testing and scripted curriculums (Ali, 2019; Burke, et al., 2020; Howell et al., 2017; Leistyna, 2010; Mazzoni, 1977; Vaughn et al.; Wooley et al., 1999; Yardley, 2000). This dissertation establishes connections between neoliberal federal policy and widespread unrest among American educators (Adams et al., 2018; Macrine et al., 2010; Nieto, 2013). National exit attrition rates as well as rates of enrollment in teacher preparatory programs examined herein connect to widespread professional dissatisfaction among public educators (Boe et al., 2008; Engledowl, et al., 2020; Nieto, 2013). Subjective Well Being (SWB) of New Mexico early educators as influenced by neoliberalist public education policy is qualitatively examined via this interpretive phenomenological analysis. Methods included interviews, surveys, and questionnaires conducted with eight New Mexico educators. Utilization of hermeneutic member checking promotes trustworthiness and credibility (Noon, 2018). Through coding, findings reveal that NM early educators’ SWB may be negatively influenced by neoliberalist policy in public education. Themes related to connections between neoliberal public education policies and SWB include: demoralization caused by leaders; control of creativity; confines of curriculum; an illusion of freedom; limitations of high stakes testing and curriculum; experiences centered on abuse, trauma, and PTSD; and exhaustion, lack of humanity in public education policy, as well as educators’ invisibility. Implications exist for the arenas of education policy, high stakes testing, curriculum, ethics in education, and educator activism.

Language: English

Published: Las Cruces, New Mexico, 2022

Article

Getting off the... Critical List

Publication: Montessori Yearbook

Pages: 21-25

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Language: English

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Self-Efficacy and Critical Race Theory: The Emotions and Identity of a Montessori Teacher

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Critical race theory, Montessori method of education - Teachers, Teachers

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Abstract/Notes: This action research project investigated how anti-critical race theory (CRT) legislation in public education has impacted the perceived self-efficacy and emotions of one Montessori educator. This 4- week self-study consisted of daily assigned reading, weekly media, and a weekly conversation to aid in multicultural critical reflective practice (MCRP). Data was measured using a pre-and post- self assessment on Qualtrics, a daily mood app, and daily critical journal reflections. The pre-and post assessment demonstrated an increase in self-efficacy to speak with confidence about the origins of CRT in education research. Daily critical journal reflections displayed an increase in the ability to critically reflect on the educator’s own positionality, suggesting that daily critical engagement with material aimed at increasing awareness of racial inequities in education builds confidence and empathy in educators. Further research should include small groups of teachers utilizing this intervention for professional development, longer or shorter daily intervention, a biometric measurement in place of the daily mood measurement, and follow-up assessments over a longer study period to determine the lasting effects of the intervention. This research has impacted my future in education both personally and professionally, with confidence in my critical thinking skills and greater awareness of how my positionality interacts with structural inequities within education as my greatest perceived benefits.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2022

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