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Book Section

Research: Objective Assessment of Montessori Implementation

Available from: ERIC

Book Title: The Relevance of Montessori Today: Meeting Human Needs-Principles to Practice: Proceeding of the AMI/USA National Conference, Bellevue, Washington, July 25-26, 1996

Pages: 71-83

AMI/USA National Conference (Bellevue, Washington, 25-26 July 1996), Americas, North America, United States of America

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Language: English

Published: New York: American Montessori Internationale of the United States (AMI/USA), 1997

Book

Linking Developmental Assessment and Early Intervention: Curriculum-Based Prescriptions

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Abstract/Notes: This is a revised edition of: "Linking developmental assessment and curricula" (1981).

Language: English

Published: Rockville, Maryland: Aspen Publishers, 1989

Edition: 2nd ed.

ISBN: 978-0-8342-0063-0

Master's Thesis (M.A.)

A Comparison of Montessori and Traditionally Schooled Five Year Olds in the Language, Motor, and Concept Area Skills of the Developmental Indicators for the Assessment of Learning-Revised

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

Comparative education, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - Evaluation

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Abstract/Notes: This quasi-experimental research study examined the performance of two groups of five year old children on the Developmental Indicators for the Assessment of Learning-Revised (DIAL-R) (1990) in relationship to their method of schooling. The purpose of the study was to compare mean scores received by the Montessori group (N=10) and the Traditional group (N=10) on Motor Area skills, Concept Area skills, and Language Area skills of the DIAL-R (1990) using t tests for independent samples. Scores received on each test item were also analyzed statistically to determine the specific strengths and weaknesses of each subject group. The findings show that there was no significant difference between the two subject groups in the Motor Area skills as assessed by the DIAL-R (1990). There was a significant difference between the two subject groups in the Concept Area skills which favored the Montessori subjects. The Montessori group performed better than did the Traditional group in the Language Area skills of the DIAL-R (1990), but the difference was not statistically significant. Implications of these findings for Early Childhood educators are discussed, in view of the fact that this sample was quite small. The findings provide support for both the Montessori and Traditional programs for young children found within the Dallas Public Schools in student performance on the DIAL-R (1990). Recommendations for further studies are also given.

Language: English

Published: Denton, Texas, 1995

Doctoral Dissertation (Ph.D.)

An Assessment of Montessori Education in Public Middle Schools in South Florida: A Mixed-Methods Inquiry

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

Americas, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, Montessori schools, Public Montessori, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This mixed methods study focused on the impact of Montessori education on middle school students and educators in a specific public school district in South Florida. The research aim was to determine what academic and social influences Montessori education had on the participants. A sequential explanatory mixed methods design was utilized to evaluate the data: archival student reading and mathematics end-of-year data and teacher interviews. Quantitative analyses of FSA scores in mathematics and reading for SY 2018-2019 indicated that middle school students that were enrolled in a full-time Montessori Magnet program offering did significantly better in mathematics and reading than non-Montessori students that attended a Magnet school hosting multiple programs, which included Montessori. The qualitative analyses (interview data and artifacts) of teacher participants revealed that they believed Montessori education impacted students and educators academically and socially. However, findings revealed that none of the teacher participants were Montessori credentialed, and credentialing of teachers is essential when on a pathway to continuous school improvement. Montessori education at the secondary levels (middle school and high school) continues to develop, creating increased opportunities for future research. Ultimately, stakeholders want to measure the success of their investments into magnet programs such as Montessori education. Research that opens doors for educational reform efforts can provide a springboard for further discussion and establish a baseline for future research in Montessori education in public secondary schools.

Language: English

Published: Miami Shores, Florida, 2023

Article

Building Legal Competencies:The Montessori Method as a Unifying Approach to Outcomes-Based Assessment in Law Schools

Publication: Ohio Northern University Law Review, vol. 42, no. 1

Pages: Article 1

Law schools, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc.

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Language: English

ISSN: 0094-534X

Book Section

Beurteilung eines Konzeptes für eine Montessori-Bildungsstätte in Kufstein mit Hilfe strategischer und operativer Controllinginstrumente [Assessment of a concept for a Montessori educational center in Kufstein with the help of strategic and operational controlling instruments]

Book Title: Untersuchungen und Ansätze zur Weiterentwicklung der Montessori-Pädagogik in Österreich [Investigations and approaches for the further development of Montessori pedagogy in Austria]

Pages: 150-174

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Language: German

Published: Innsbruck, Germany: Studien Verlag, 2009

Edition: 1st ed.

ISBN: 978-3-7065-4721-5 3-7065-4721-X

Series: Initiative neues Lernen

Report

A Longitudinal Investigation of Montessori and Traditional Prekindergarten Training with Inner City Children: A Comparative Assessment of Learning Outcomes – Three Part Study

Available from: ERIC

Americas, Comparative education, Longitudinal studies, North America, United States of America, Urban education

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Abstract/Notes: This research investigates the learning impact of Montessori prekindergarten training as compared to traditional approaches with economically deprived Puerto Rican and Negro children. The three-part, 156-page monograph includes a 22-page introduction to Parts I and II, and a 37-page appendix to Part I. Parts I and II assess training effects of the first year of schooling, focusing on children beginning prekindergarten at approximately 4 to 4 1/2 years of age. The basic research design also includes an evaluation of training for children beginning school at 3 to 3 1/2 years. Part I contains an evaluation of perceptual and cognitive abilities. Part II investigates pupil preference for cognitive styles typifying ego strength in the young child and relevant for autonomous problem-solving strategies. Part III includes a follow-up assessment conducted at the end of kindergarten in order to investigate the cumulative effects of training over a longer period of schooling. The appendix to Part I contains age, sex, and ethnicity trends for the population investigated, a 25-page description of the test battery, a sample teaching log monthly checklist, and a list of sample questions for teacher interviews. The monograph also includes a list of 54 references used for Parts I, II, and III.

Language: English

Published: New York, New York, Sep 1969

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