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739 results

Article

What Happens After Montessori? What Parents, Students, and Teachers Believe About the Success of Former Montessori Elementary Students in Junior High School

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 10, no. 4

Pages: 45–47

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

The Coming of Life: An Impressionistic Time Line for Elementary Students, Part 3

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 23, no. 3

Pages: 16–19

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Abstract/Notes: Part 3 of 3

Language: English

Conference Paper

Academic Achievement Outcomes: Montessori and Non-Montessori Public Elementary Students

Available from: Semantic Scholar

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Language: English

Master's Thesis (M.S.)

Academic Achievement Outcomes: Montessori and Non-Montessori Public Elementary Students

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

Academic achievement, Americas, Comparative education, Early childhood care and education, Elementary education, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, Public Montessori, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Within the realm of elementary public schools, several pedagogical models of early childhood education are practiced in the United States (Lillard, 2007). The constructivist approach to early childhood education is illustrative of best practices based on current theory. One model of constructivist early childhood education is the Montessori Method founded in the early twentieth century by Maria Montessori, an Italian physician (Montessori, 1912/1964). Though the Montessori Method is aligned with research-based best practices espoused by constructivism, there are relatively few public Montessori schools currently in the United States. A direct comparison is needed between the academic outcomes of public elementary school programs which implement the Montessori Method and those which implement a more traditional approach to early childhood education. The focus of this study is the academic achievement outcomes of Montessori public school students as compared to similar non-Montessori students.

Language: English

Published: Commerce, Texas, 2013

Article

Voyage on the High Seas [Elementary students tour tall ship]

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 23, no. 4

Pages: 18

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Language: English

Report

Reading and Math Achievement for African American Lower Elementary Students in Public Montessori Programs

Available from: National Center for Montessori in the Public Sector (NCMPS)

Academic achievement, African American community, African Americans, Americas, Arithmetic - Achievement, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Lower elementary, Mathematics - Achievement, Montessori method of education, North America, Public Montessori

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Abstract/Notes: As Montessori programs in public schools expand, Montessori education is becoming available to a more diverse population of American students than ever before. Students of color have a significant presence in public Montessori schools; over a quarter of students in whole-school public Montessori programs are African American. As these programs grow, researchers have increasingly directed their attention to demonstrating that Montessori works in public schools; however, few studies have examined outcomes for African American students at the lower elementary level, when critical reading and math skills are being established. This study sought to answer the question, how effectively does Montessori instruction promote achievement for African American third grade students in reading and math, compared to similar traditional schools and other public school choice programs?

Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C., 2016

Master's Thesis

A Mindful Start to the Day: Methods to Enhance Concentration for Lower Elementary Students in a Montessori Classroom

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

Attention in children, Concentration, Lower elementary, Mindfulness, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: Concentration is meaningful not only for students' academic achievement but also for the construction and development of their personality. Mindfulness has been suggested as an effective way of supporting concentration. Based on research and related literature review, the author consolidated different ways of mindfulness into a handbook with the purpose of providing methods for fellow teachers in supporting children in a Montessori lower elementary classroom to enhance their concentration capability. This project was presented to a focus group and feedback was collected in the form of a survey. Collected feedback showed the most and the least possible method that might be applied and it implied mindfulness training for teachers can be the next topic for research.

Language: English

Published: Moraga, California, 2020

Article

Can Elementary Students Choose, Develop, and Sustain Multiple Personal Goals?

Publication: AMI/USA News, vol. 11, no. 2

Pages: 4–8

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Language: English

Doctoral Dissertation (Ph.D.)

Examining Elementary Students’ Development of Intercultural Competence through Self-Regulatory Prompts

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of the present quasi-experimental mixed-methods study was to examine the effects of an Intercultural Competence Intervention with Self-Regulatory Prompts (ICI-SRP) on elementary students’ development of intercultural knowledge, skills, and attitudes, and their self-efficacy beliefs in self-regulating their intercultural learning, and to investigate the ways in which self-regulatory prompts (SRP) influence elementary students’ activation of self-regulatory strategies in intercultural learning. Twenty (N=20) Montessori elementary students from two Montessori schools participated in four sessions of an intercultural exercise, in which only the experimental group were given SRP. It was hypothesized that the experimental group’s use of SRP would further enhance the participants’ development of intercultural knowledge, skills, and attitudes and their self-efficacy beliefs in self-regulating their intercultural learning. Quantitative data collected from the ICI-SRP survey was analyzed by conducting a univariate analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) for each of its four subscales and was used to examine the effects of SRP on the students’ development of intercultural competence (IC) and self-efficacy beliefs in self-regulating intercultural learning. Qualitative data collected from focus groups was analyzed using the constant comparative method to shed light on the ways in which SRP influence the students’ activation of self-regulatory strategies in intercultural learning. Results from the ANCOVA did not support the hypothesis, as they showed non-statistically significant differences between the development of intercultural knowledge, skills, and attitudes, and the self-efficacy beliefs in self-regulating intercultural learning in both groups. Results from the ANCOVA showed numerical increases in intercultural knowledge, skills, and attitudes in both groups, and numerical decreases in the self-efficacy beliefs in self-regulating intercultural learning in both groups. Findings from the analysis of the focus group data were mostly aligned with the data from the ANCOVA. Data from the focus groups shed light on different types of IC knowledge, skills, and attitudes, and different types of planning and monitoring applied by participants of both groups. The overall findings of the present study suggest that it is likely for elementary aged students to develop IC through intercultural exercises, and that SRP may support that development under certain conditions. The findings of the study may contribute to the development of elementary students’ intercultural learning methods and tools.

Language: English

Published: Fairfax, Virginia, 2022

Doctoral Dissertation (Ed.D.)

Does Parental Involvement Matter? A Comparison of the Effects of Two Different Types of Parental Involvement on Urban Elementary Students' Academic Performance

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: This mixed method study seeks to utilize a comparative analysis to explore the impacts of two types of parental involvement in urban elementary school students’ academic performance. Epstein’s (1995) widely cited typology describes six different types of parental involvement, and this typology serves as a framework for this study. More specifically, this study compares learning at home and collaborating with community, as parent involvement types, to student academic performance. The study utilizes descriptive statistics and correlational analyses to compare parent-reported student performance via a survey instrument and semi-structured focus group interviews to collect narrative data. Parental involvement has been vigorously studied over the last two decades, however, not much data appears to address how collaborating with the community, as a form of involvement, influences student performance and other studies provide an ambiguous picture for learning at home as another parenting type. Furthermore, there is evidence that direct-action parent organizing, as a parental involvement form of collaborating with the community, may impact educational outcomes and this study examines these research areas. After analyzing the data, the researcher did not find evidence of a significant relationship between learning at home and parent-reported student academic performance. However, the study did reveal a significant association between parents who were collaborating with the community and the parent-reported academic performance of their children. This moderate correlation from an often overlooked parenting type, collaborating with the community, may harbor rich findings within the literature and point to the need for greater scrutiny herein. In fact, this provides a warrant for additional research to explore the “efficacy” of collaborating with community as a type of parental involvement that significantly influences positive student academic performance.

Language: English

Published: Baltimore, Maryland, 2018

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