Quick Search
For faster results please use our Quick Search engine.

Advanced Search

Search across titles, abstracts, authors, and keywords.
Advanced Search Guide.

542 results

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Mindfulness and its Effects on Self-Regulation in a Lower Elementary Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Lower elementary, Mindfulness, Montessori method of education

See More

Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this action research was to determine the effect of a variety of mindfulness activities and exercises on self-regulation. Twenty-eight students from a lower elementary class of first, second, and third graders in a public Montessori school participated in the study. Data was collected over a period of six weeks using an on task behavior tally sheet, productivity scoring rubric, observational notes, behavior logs, self-assessments, student feedback, and an auditory following directions matrix. Results show a promising association between mindfulness and self-regulation. All students enjoyed partaking in mindfulness and reported positive associations with the intervention and showed increases in multiple measures. Improvements were observed in productivity, behavior, listening and following directions, and focus to include a decrease in the amount of disruptive behaviors. The data shows that mindfulness can be integrated into the classroom to assist students socially, emotionally and academically. Further research should be conducted to validate these results.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2018

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effect of Purposeful Movement in the Garden On Attention and Focus in the Primary Montessori Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

See More

Abstract/Notes: This study explores how gardening affects students’ focus and attention in a primary Montessori classroom. Over the course of a four-week intervention, the teacher-researcher provided eleven students with mini-gardening lessons, followed by time to use purposeful movement in the garden. When students returned to the classroom to assume their Montessori work activities, the researcher collected data by recording the time it took the students to get on task, whether or not students were focused, and which unfocused behaviors were exhibited. A pre-and post-attitude scale was completed by the students to determine prior experiences and attitudes towards gardening. The study revealed that during the intervention, time to get on task decreased and ability to focus increased. Students who were habitually inattentive and not focused continued this pattern, but did show improvement over the life of the study. Further research is needed to support these findings; post-intervention data could be collected to determine long-term impacts, and a higher number of students should be involved in the intervention for generalization purposes.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2018

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of Record-Keeping on Teacher Self-Efficacy and Student Self-Regulation in the Primary Montessori Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

See More

Abstract/Notes: This paper examines the effects of teacher use of an online record-keeping system on teacher self-efficacy and student self-regulation behavior. Four teachers and thirty-four students between the ages of three and six years old participated in this seven-week study in one of the few Montessori schools in a Latin American capital city. Pre- and post-study data collection methods included a teacher self-efficacy questionnaire and small group discussion, as well as use of the Head-to-Toe Test, a means of measuring children’s self-regulation behavior. For seven weeks, teachers used the program Transparent Classroom to record lessons, inform their lesson presentations, and track overall student progress. Through weekly classroom observations, child behaviors hindering and encouraging normalization were tracked with a tally sheet. Data showed increases in both teacher self-efficacy and student self-regulation, especially in children with the lowest pre-study scores, who saw dramatic gains. These results show the use of a record-keeping system may be a means of increasing achievement and satisfaction in both students and teachers.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2018

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Impact of Grace and Courtesy Instruction and Modeling on the Normalization of a Montessori Primary Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

See More

Abstract/Notes: This action research studied the effect of instructing and modeling grace and courtesy lessons on the normalization of a primary Montessori classroom. The study was conducted at a private, in-home Montessori classroom serving children three to six years of age. Nine students received daily presentations of grace and courtesy lessons over four weeks totaling twenty lessons in all. Sources of data included student-teacher conferencing, tally sheets, behavioral self-assessments, and teacher journaling. Instructing and modeling grace and courtesy lessons resulted in an increase in desired behaviors, a more positive classroom environment, and additional knowledge gained on this subject. Throughout this study, students began showing signs of normalization and required less assistance from the teacher. The lessons of grace and courtesy can positively impact the learning environment and lead to the normalization of a Montessori primary classroom.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2018

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Anti-Bias Work on Self-Identity in a Primary Montessori Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

See More

Abstract/Notes: This research sought to determine the effect of implementing an anti-bias curriculum on the selfidentity of children in a private primary Montessori classroom. Twenty-two students aged three to six from a highly concentrated urban community in a northeastern coastal city participated in the study. Pre and post discussion questions, a running log of personal observations, visible child-produced artifacts, and an attribute checklists were the four tools used in this study. These tools determined the effect of the anti-bias work on each child’s ability to self-identify. The interactions and artifacts produced specific and traceable data on children’s thoughts and perceptions before and during the implementation of anti-bias work. Data analysis concluded that the study impacted the student’s ability to self-identify positively. To further investigate this work, I will continue to present anti-bias materials, engage in discussions, and provide diverse works for all children to explore in the inclusive environment.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2017

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

How Acts of Kindness Facilitate Prosocial Behaviors in an Early Childhood Montessori Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

See More

Abstract/Notes: This action research project examined how the implementation of Kindness Guidelines affected prosocial behavior among Early Childhood students. The setting was a private Montessori school, with 18 children ages two to five-years-old. Guidelines were developed using child-generated ideas on how to be kind to themselves, others, and the environment, along with teacher-made materials that illustrated acts of kindness and emotional awareness. Implementation of the intervention lasted six weeks with 20 days of data collected during two 15-20 minute observations per day. Positive and negative behaviors were recorded using tally sheets and an observation journal. Use of teacher-made materials was tracked using a materials log, and children expressed their ideas about kindness through drawings. Data analysis showed that positive behaviors increased and indicated the changes were related to the intervention. Ideas for further research include increasing emotional awareness in children and how the practice of observation affects children’s behavior.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2017

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Supporting Narrative Writing Proficiency and Engagement in a Montessori Upper Elementary Classroom through the Writing Workshop Model and 6+1 Traits of Writing

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Upper elementary

See More

Abstract/Notes: This action research project set out to determine the effects of daily writing workshop lessons, including the 6+1 Traits of Writing vocabulary, on student writing proficiency and engagement. An upper elementary classroom of 17 students, consisting of nine fourth graders and eight fifth graders, in an independent, suburban Montessori school participated in this study. Students completed a five-week narrative writing unit from Calkins, Ochs, & Luick’s (2017) Up the Ladder curriculum. The teacher-researcher collected data through observation, writing prompts scored using a 6+1 Traits of Writing rubric, student feedback forms, Bottomley, Henk, & Melnick’s (1997/1998) Writer Self-Perception Scale, and small group feedback sessions. The data suggested that students, particularly weaker writers, made gains in writing proficiency. Further research is necessary to determine if students would be more engaged in writing than other subjects and if classrooms with a full three-year age span would make similar gains in writing proficiency.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2017

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of Loose Parts and Nature-Based Play on Creativity in the Montessori Early Childhood (3-6 year old) Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

See More

Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this research was to determine if the addition of natural loose parts, or manipulatives, to the outdoor play yard would increase creativity in the classroom. This study took place in a private Montessori school with 14 children ages 3 to 6 years old over a five-week period. Various methods were used to gather information to determine any change in creativity. Observations of creative behaviors, concentration (state of flow), and spontaneous collaboration were collected as well as drawing tests for creative thinking, and samples of creative writing and artwork. The results of the study found that the loose parts did not increase creativity in the classroom. However, the addition of the loose parts did correlate with an increase in collaboration, imaginative play and a possible increase in concentration. Suggestions for further research include extending the amount of time the study took place, and focusing on one age rather than a mixed aged grouping.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2016

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Using Mindfulness to Self-Regulate in the Upper Elementary Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Upper elementary

See More

Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this research was to determine the effects on students’ ability to self regulate while learning about daily mindfulness lessons. The study took place over the course of six weeks in an upper elementary class of 20 students, including four fourth graders, nine fifth graders, and seven sixth graders. The study was conducted in a rural public Montessori school in the Midwest. Students participated in a six-week mindfulness unit from The Mind Up Curriculum (The Hawn Foundation, 2011). The researcher collected data through a pre-and postassessment, students’ self reflections and graphs, researcher’s observation, and researcher’s daily journal. The data suggested students, when given mindfulness lessons, could become more selfregulated. From pre and post assessment, there was a 170% growth in the number of students who would like to use mindfulness techniques in their future. Although the numbers increased, further research could demonstrate effects of mindfulness lessons for on-task behavior and selfregulation over a longer period of time.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2017

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of Mindfulness Practices and Activities on Student Attention and Work Engagement in a Multi-age 4th to 6th grade Montessori Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

See More

Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this research was to test whether the implementation of mindfulness exercises would increase focus and work engagement of students. This study incorporated breathing and visualization exercises three times a week. The 5-week study involved 44 children between the ages of 9 and 12 years in a private Montessori school in Northern Michigan. Data collection included daily tallies of on and off task behavior, daily observations of work engagement, pre and post questionnaires about mindfulness completed by each child, and oneon- one discussions with each participant. Results showed an increase in the number of students on task and more students engaged in work over time. The pre and post questionnaire showed an increase in the number of students who liked mindfulness exercises and thought they were helpful, but expressed mixed opinions related to statements regarding focus and distraction. Eighty-two percent of students responded that they found mindfulness exercises helpful. Thirtysix percent mentioned the words “focus” or “concentrate” in their descriptions of how the mindfulness exercises were helpful. Eighty percent responded that they would use the mindfulness techniques independently. The data showed a positive correlation between the implementation of mindfulness exercises and focus in children ages 9 to 12. Suggestions for further research include increasing conversations about ways students can practice mindfulness exercises independently and an extended research period.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2016

Advanced Search