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Book

Integrating Technology in a Montessori Classroom

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: The importance of the prepared environment to the Montessori educational philosophy necessitates careful teacher training to successfully implement computer technology in the Montessori classroom. This paper explores the views and experiences of 11 Montessori teachers in integrating computers in their classroom. The paper maintains that Maria Montessori would likely embrace computer technology in the classroom and that the current question should be when, where, and how children should be introduced to computer experiences rather than whether they should be exposed to computers. The concerns of Montessorians with regard to educational technology are presented, including insecurity when encountering the unknown and concerns about diluting the purity of the Montessori philosophy and method. The paper also lists characteristics of computer software that should be considered in software selection. Benefits of appropriate computer software are described. Also detailed are the impressions of 11 Montessori public school educators who evaluated the use of iMac software specifically and educational technology generally. The teachers suggested that computer software may complement the Montessori curriculum and allow the child to move to a more abstract level after mastering the Montessori manipulatives. Teachers generally used the iMac software to support the program through research or extensions of lessons. Almost all the teachers agreed that technology reflects the Montessori philosophy because children need to adapt and be knowledgeable about technology. The paper concludes with a discussion of the use of the Internet.

Language: English

Published: Tuckahoe, New York: [s.n.], 2000

Book

A Demonstration of the Use of Film Strips in a Montessori Classroom

American Montessori Society (AMS), Lena L. Gitter - Writings, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools

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Language: English

Published: Chicago, Illinois: [s.n.], 1969

Book

Integrating Music into the Preprimary, Montessori Classroom

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Language: English

Published: [S.I.]: Golden Clef Publications, 1996

AudioRecording

Folk Tunes and Music of the Masters Adapted for the Classroom

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Abstract/Notes: SIDE A: Band I –– March (Old French Bugle Call) – Run (Russian Folk Tune) – March (Serbian Folk Tune) – Run (Puerto Rican Folk Tune) – March (Jewish Folk Tune) – Run (German Folk Tune) – March (Dutch Folk Tune) – Run (Lithuanian Folk Tune) – March (Soldier's March, Schumann) – Run (Danish Folk Tune) // Band II –– Gallop (Venezuelian Folk Tune) – March (Ukranian Folk Tune) – Run (Pillow Dance, J. Strauss Sr.) – March (from "Carmen", Bizet) – Gallop (Styrian Folk Tune) – March (Hungarian Folk Tune) – Run (from "Orpheus in the Underworld", Offenbach) // Band III –– Slow Walk (French Lullaby) – Gallop (Irish Folk Tune) – March (German Folk Tune, Theme in 4th Movement, Beethoven: Septet Op. 20) – Run (Czech Folk Tune) – Slow Walk (Italian Lullaby) – Gallop (Greek Folk Tune) – March (French Folk Tune, Theme for Variations Suite #5, Handel) – Skip (Swiss Folk Tune) // SIDE B: Band I –– Trot (Ecossaise: Schubert) – Slow Walk (American Lullaby) – Gallop (from: "Fidelio", Beethoven) – March (Polish March Song) – Trot (from: "Trio op. 14 #1", Mozart) – Slow Walk (Basque Folk Tune) – Run-March (English Folk Tune) – Skip (Norwegian Folk Tune) – Slow Walk (Neapolitan Folk Tune) // Band II –– Waltz Step (Portuguese Folk Tune) – Run March (Polish Folk Tune) – Trot (from: "The Masked Ball", Verdi) – Waltz Step (American Cowboy Song) – Gallop (from: Sonatina op. 100, Dvorak) – Slow Walk (The Little Boat: Mendelssohn) – Trot (Finnish Folk Tune) – Waltz Step (Catalonian Folk Tune) – March-Run-March (German Folk Tune) – Slow March (from "Iphigeni En Tauride", Gluck) // Band III –– Polka (American Folk Tune) – Waltz Step (Slovenian Folk Tune) – Skip (Scotch Folk Tune) – Slow March (from: "Caro Mio Ben", Giordani) – Polka (Danish Folk Tune) – March (French Folk Tune, arr. in L'Arlesienne Suite #2, Bizet) – Run (from: Quartet Op. 74 #2, Haydn) – Waltz Step (Czechosolovakian Folk Tune)

Language: English

Master's Thesis

Differentiation of instructional and curricular practices for gifted students in Montessori classrooms

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: The major purpose of this study was to determine if and how Montessori classrooms differentiate instructional and curricular practices for gifted and talented students. The Classroom Practices Record (Westberg, Dobyns, Archambault, 1990) was used to determine the degree of differentiation. Observations were made of gifted and average children in four private elementary AMS affiliated Montessori classrooms in Indiana. The collected data were analyzed descriptively. The results indicate that little differentiation occurred in verbal or curricular practices for gifted and talented students within the observed classrooms.

Language: English

Published: Waco, Texas, 2000

Book Section

Montessori in Public Schools: Interdependence of the Culture of the School, the Context of the Classroom, and the Content of the Curriculum

Available from: Books to Borrow @ Internet Archive

Book Title: Montessori in Contemporary American Culture

Pages: 229-237

Americas, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, Public Montessori, United States of America

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Language: English

Published: Portsmouth, New Hampshire: Heinemann, 1992

ISBN: 0-435-08709-6 978-0-435-08709-8

Presentation

Liberty, Discipline and Pedagogy: Mapping Pathways Towards Social and Cultural Independence Through the Regulation of Activity and Attention in a Montessori Classroom

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Abstract/Notes: The term discipline weaves together, through its etymology and use, both learning and regulation, suggesting that one cannot be achieved without the other. It is in this sense, that Dr Maria Montessori applied the term as she designed her distinctive pedagogy during the first half of the twentieth century. Her aim was for children to regulate their activity and their attention through interaction with meticulously designed objects combined with precise language, including the language of educational disciplines. What distinguishes Montessori pedagogy is that children’s liberty is identified as both the means and the end of this regulation. Liberty and discipline were considered by Dr Montessori (1998 [1939], p. 41) to be ‘two faces of the same coin, two faces of the same action’. Montessori’s emphasis on liberty locates her pedagogy in the Enlightenment tradition, but her simultaneous emphasis on discipline, in both senses, reveals an orientation out of step with the tradition of Rousseau, the tradition which remains in the foreground whenever pedagogy is linked with the legacy of the Enlightenment. This paper presents Montessori’s pedagogy of liberty and discipline as one realisation of another, less visible, Enlightenment tradition. This tradition comes into clearer view when human development is perceived as socially, and therefore, semiotically, mediated (Vygotsky 1986 [1934]) and pedagogy is perceived as discipline knowledge embedded in a regulating social order (Bernstein 2000).

Language: English

Presented: University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia: Disciplinarity, Knowledge and Language (Symposium), Dec 2008

Book

A Classroom Made of Dirt

Montessori method of education

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Language: English

Published: Rochester, New York: AMI/USA, 2011

Series: Parenting for a New World: A Collection of Essays

Article

The Outdoor Classroom

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 31, no. 4

Pages: 17

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Master's Thesis

Inclusive Pedagogical Practices Found in a Montessori Primary Classroom: A Case Study in Gauteng [Johannesburg]

Available from: University of Witwatersrand - Institutional Repository

Africa, Inclusive education, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, South Africa, Southern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa

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Abstract/Notes: In order to explore the way in which pedagogical practices are identified as being inclusive and might appear as they are used by teachers in Montessori settings, this instrumental case study is focused on finding nine inclusive pedagogical practices. The identified practices were clustered according to the themes of promoting collaboration, access to the curriculum and the recognition and acceptance of learners. Using direct observation in classrooms and individual teacher interviews as data collection methods, four teachers in Montessori primary classrooms were the main participants in this study. A combination of deductive and inductive methods was used to analyse the data. This study is set within a theoretical framework that includes Florian and Black-Hawkins’ rights-based interpretation of inclusive education in the management of a variety of learning needs among learners. The study also examines the relationship between the Montessori Method and inclusive pedagogical practices found in order to understand the extent to which the Montessori Method had an influence on the practices. The findings of this study indicate that elements such as the classroom setup, multi-age groupings and a strong focus on the individual learner had some influence on the inclusivity of the pedagogical practices observed.

Language: English

Published: Johannesburg, South Africa, 2015

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