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864 results

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Societal Values and Policies May Curtail Preschool Children’s Physical Activity in Child Care Centers

Available from: American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)

Publication: Pediatrics, vol. 129, no. 2

Pages: 265-274

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Abstract/Notes: BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Three-fourths of US preschool-age children are in child care centers. Children are primarily sedentary in these settings, and are not meeting recommended levels of physical activity. Our objective was to identify potential barriers to children’s physical activity in child care centers. METHODS: Nine focus groups with 49 child care providers (55% African American) were assembled from 34 centers (inner-city, suburban, Head Start, and Montessori) in Cincinnati, Ohio. Three coders independently analyzed verbatim transcripts for themes. Data analysis and interpretation of findings were verified through triangulation of methods. RESULTS: We identified 3 main barriers to children’s physical activity in child care: (1) injury concerns, (2) financial, and (3) a focus on “academics.” Stricter licensing codes intended to reduce children's injuries on playgrounds rendered playgrounds less physically challenging and interesting. In addition, some parents concerned about potential injury, requested staff to restrict playground participation for their children. Small operating margins of most child care centers limited their ability to install abundant playground equipment. Child care providers felt pressure from state mandates and parents to focus on academics at the expense of gross motor play. Because children spend long hours in care and many lack a safe place to play near their home, these barriers may limit children's only opportunity to engage in physical activity. CONCLUSIONS: Societal priorities for young children—safety and school readiness—may be hindering children’s physical development. In designing environments that optimally promote children’s health and development, child advocates should think holistically about potential unintended consequences of policies.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1542/peds.2011-2102

ISSN: 0031-4005, 1098-4275

Doctoral Dissertation (Ed.D.)

The Effect of Teaching Method on an Assemblage of the Binomial Cube by Preschool Children

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Language: English

Published: DeKalb, Illinois, 1981

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

IES Arrow-Dot Longitudinal Study of Personality Development in Preschool Children

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: Perceptual and Motor Skills, vol. 40, no. 1

Pages: 209-210

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Abstract/Notes: Preschool children were administered the IES Arrow-Dot at the beginning and end of the school year and scores compared with those based on a prior study in a Montessori preschool. Developmental trends of declining Impulsivity and rising Ego scores were corroborated. Superego development remained almost stable in contrast to a significant rise for the Montessori sample. Results support effective use of the test with preschoolers to assess baselines and developmental patterns of personality integration.

Language: English

DOI: 10.2466/pms.1975.40.1.209

ISSN: 1558-688X, 0031-5125

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Longitudinal Corroboration of a Cross-Sectional Study of Development of Preschool Children with the Arrow-dot Test

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: Perceptual and Motor Skills, vol. 30, no. 1

Pages: 269-270

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Abstract/Notes: Children in a Montessori preschool were administered a series of tests at the beginning of the school year and retested on the same battery 8 mo. later, at the end of the school year. The children exhibited a mean gain of about 11 points on the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test IQ. They also exhibited a decline in Impuisivity and an increase in Superego scores, on the average, as measured by the Arrow-Dot Test. These longitudinal results corroborate an earlier cross-sectional analysis; and, as these results follow a prediction from Freudian theory, give indication of construct validity for the test.

Language: English

DOI: 10.2466/pms.1970.30.1.269

ISSN: 1558-688X, 0031-5125

Conference Paper

Is There a Need for Handicraft in Preschool? Attitudes of Preschool Teachers and Parents on Including Handicraft Activities in the Regular Preschool Program

Available from: IATED Digital Library

INTED2020 14th International Technology, Education and Development Conference

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Abstract/Notes: Alternative educational concepts evolved in response to classical educational methods in which children are placed in a passive position and the transfer of knowledge is cultivated as a form of teaching. Models of alternative pedagogy (Montessori, Waldorf, Reggio, Agazzi) advocate developmentally appropriate practices which Bredekamp (1993) describes as a presence of different strategies, i.e., child-oriented behaviours of teachers and responding to the child's individual needs. In order to help each child to grow into a universal and competent individual from preschool age, it is necessary to encourage their imagination and creativity, as well as to acquire habits of cooperation and coexistence with other children. One of the activities which promote these desirable characteristics in children is handicraft. Many studies and findings in the area of neuroscience, multiple intelligences theories, and the aforementioned alternative pedagogical concepts emphasize the importance of handicraft and point out its benefits not only for children but for the entire community. However, such an approach to children's learning and activity is poorly represented in educational institutions. Therefore, the aim of the study was to examine the views of preschool teachers and parents on handicraft activities and its more frequent use in regular preschool programs. The survey was conducted by an anonymous questionnaire on a sample of 316 respondents, preschool teachers (N=141) and parents (N=175). The results of the study show that both preschool teachers and parents agree that certain elements of alternative concepts such as handicraft have a positive impact on the overall development of the child and that they are useful and practical life skills. They also agree that handicraft activities should be used in educational institutions to a greater extent. [Conference Name: 14th International Technology, Education and Development Conference; ISBN: 9788409179398; Place: Valencia, Spain]

Language: English

Published: Valencia, Spain: International Academy of Technology, Education and Development (IATED), 2020

Pages: 1511-1519

DOI: 10.21125/inted.2020.0499

ISBN: 978-84-09-17939-8

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Approaches Adopted by Preschools to Foster Literacy Skills Among Preschoolers

Available from: Language in India

Publication: Language in India, vol. 11, no. 10

Pages: 150-170

Asia, India, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Pre-school programs give children an edge in a competitive world and education climate. It teaches children the basic skills necessary to be successful in formal schooling. Pre-schools provide children a good foundation for continued learning, communication, higher self-esteem and enjoyment of the learning process. Pre-schools have the important task of giving children numerous and varied opportunities to promote children’s development during the formative years including physical development, social development and literary competence. Literary competences open the door to academic learning and help ensure later success in school. The present study was conducted to elicit information on the approaches adopted by pre-schools to foster literary skills among pre-schoolers in Bangalore city. A representative sample of 30 preschool centres were surveyed - 9 Montessori, 8 kindergarten, 8 play-way and 5 crèches. After an introductory session in the preschool centres, a self-developed questionnaire was distributed to the preschool teachers to elicit information on the approaches adopted by pre-schools to foster literary skills among pre-schoolers. Analysis of data obtained indicated that the preschools surveyed had no adequate approaches to foster literary skills in pre-schoolers. Also the preschools surveyed had no adequate library facilities.

Language: English

ISSN: 1930-2940

Article

Do Preschool Teaching in Preschools, Not in 6-9 Classes

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 4, no. 3

Pages: 6

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

Montessori Preschool Education: 유아교육에 관하여 [Montessori Preschool Education: About Early Childhood Education]

Available from: RISS

Publication: 人間理解 / Journal of Human Understanding and Counseling, vol. 3

Pages: 23-31

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Language: Korean

ISSN: 2005-0860, 2671-5821

Book

Preschools and Montessori Preschools: A Discussion

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Language: English

Published: Newtown, Australia: Nursery School Teacher's College, 1980

Master's Thesis

Vilka metoder väljer förskollärare och barnskötare för arbetet med förskolebarns skriv- och läsutveckling? [What methods do preschool teachers and childminders choose for the work with preschool children's writing and reading development?]

Available from: DiVA Portal

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Abstract/Notes: Syftet med studien var att få kunskap om de metoder som förskollärarna använder vid arbetet med skriv- och läsutveckling. I studien ingick sju förskolor där de ansvariga förskollärarna/barnskötarna ...

Language: Swedish

Published: Stockholm, Sweden, 2013

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