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Book Section

Synopsis of Study of Montessori Application for Brain-Damaged Children

Book Title: Proceedings of the International Symposium [American Montessori Society (AMS)]

Pages: 26-30

Brain damage, Brain-damaged children, Children with disabilities, Conferences, Inclusive education

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Language: English

Published: New York: American Montessori Society, 1979

Book Section

Montessori Versus Orthodox: A Study to Determine the Relative Improvement of the Preschool Child with Brain Damage Trained by One of the Two Methods

Book Title: Montessori and the Special Child

Pages: 158-168

Brain-damaged children, Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc.

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Language: English

Published: New York: Putnam's sons, 1969

Article

Montessori Versus Orthodox: A Study to Determine the Relative Improvement of the Preschool Child with Brain Damage, Trained by One of the Two Methods

Publication: Communications (Association Montessori Internationale, 195?-2008), vol. 1966, no. 4

Pages: 38-39

Brain-damaged children, Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 0519-0959

Article

Montessori Versus Orthodox: A Study to Determine the Relative Improvement of the Preschool Child with Brain Damage, Trained by One of the Two Methods

Publication: Rehabilitation Literature, vol. 26, no. 10

Pages: 294-304

Brain-damaged children, Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc.

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Language: English

ISSN: 0034-3579

Article

Montessori Expands: Teaching of Brain Damaged Children

Publication: Science Newsletter, vol. 88

Pages: 375

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Language: English

Book

Montessori and Brain Research

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Abstract/Notes: Researchers in medicine, education, and related fields continue to make new discoveries about how the brain functions or malfunctions. The implications of studies of how young children learn compare favorably with those of educators such as Maria Montessori, Jerome Bruner, and Jean Piaget. These researchers saw growth and development as a series of stages related to inherited potential, maturation, and experiences. Brain research has concluded that (1) no single area of the brain can function alone, (2) individuals generate and associate different meanings to similar experiences, (3) the brain grows in spurts, (4) the brain responds to the environment surrounding it, (5) the brain can easily establish elaborate abstract coding and decoding systems, and (6) the brain deals with the world systematically. The role of the Montessori teacher--making the children the center of learning, encouraging children to use the freedom provided for them, observing children in order to prepare the best possible environment, recognizing sensitive periods, and diverting unacceptable behavior into meaningful tasks--supports the implications of this research.

Language: English

Published: Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania: Bloomsburg University, 1985

Article

Dr. Montessori and the Implications of Current Brain Research (The Child's Brain/the Child's Mind)

Publication: The Alcove: Newsletter of the Australian AMI Alumni Association, no. 13

Pages: 3–5

Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Neuroscience

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Language: English

Article

Hemispheres of the Brain [Part 3 of The Physiology of the Brain]

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 6, no. 2

Pages: 5, 7

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Language: English

Article

A New Life, A New Brain

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 26, no. 1

Pages: 45-70

Child development, Human development, Montessori method of education, Neuroscience, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Discusses the connection between brain development and human educational needs based on neuroscience research. Considers brain development from conception, including cell structure, myelination, and regional development of the brain, stressing the importance of a child's early environment and the prenatal vulnerability of the brain.

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Music, the Brain, and Education

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 17, no. 3

Pages: 40-45

Montessori method of education, Music - Instruction and study, Neuroscience

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Abstract/Notes: This article focuses on role of music education. If the society has changed how it values music, it is certainly worthwhile to reevaluate the role music should play in the education and development of a child. Children are not predisposed to be able to understand one style of music over another. Rather they learn traits of the style of their culture, just as they learn the grammar and syntax of their native tongue. In fact, the parallel with language, at least on this developmental level, is quite appropriate. Very early in their lives, infants are able to distinguish subtle differences in pitch and timbre (the qualities of a sound). At the same time, though, that a child's brain begins to focus on the sounds produced by what will become the primary language, his ears also become attuned to and accustomed to the content of the music of his society. Above all, it is important to remember that a child's brain learns how to process the sounds that meet his ear through repeated exposure. There are three models commonly used for bringing music into the classroom. The first is the most traditional, teaching music as a subject with the hope of turning out young people proficient in performing music. The second model is a more recent development, the result of much research into the neuroscience of learning that suggests that music can aid the brain in acquiring new information. The third model has traditionally been reserved only for younger children, and it involves music in the classroom as a kind of entertainment or diversion. Each of these models has value and deserves a place in the educational system, but each can be reevaluated in light of new perspectives on music. Any effects music can have on a developing brain are dependent on previous exposure, on a child's having begun to learn the syntax of the music he has heard. And any aesthetic and emotional power music can wield is dependent not only on the performers, but also on the listeners having a shared musicabulary. In short, music has beneficial effects only to the extent that music is shared: Active music making must be a part of daily lives if it is to have any long-term effects.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

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